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Letter not found. 3 May 1790. Offered for sale in the Parke-Bernet Catalogue No. 468, May 1943.
I have recd. with great Pleasure your Letters of 22d. April and 19. March. These important Letters I have not yet had time to answer, but the subjects of them shall be well weighed. I write this to introduce a Neighbour of mine, in Braintree, Captn. Benjamin Beal who is desirous of seeing Philadelphia for the first time. He was born and bred my Neighbour, has followed the sea many years and...
No! You and I will not cease to discuss political questions: but We will agree to disagree , whenever We please, or rather whenever either of Us thinks he has reason for it.—I really know not what you mean by apeing the Corruptions of the British Court. I wish Congress had been called to meet at Philadelphia: but as it is now here, I can conceive of no Way to get it transported hither, without...
I cannot give up my dear Latin and Greek although Fortune has never permitted me to enjoy so much of them as I wished. I don’t love you the less however for your Indifference or even opposition to them. Pray do you carry your Theory so far as to wish to exclude French, Italian, Spanish, and Tudesque? I begun to fear that your multiplied phisical and other engagements had made you forget me....
Th: Jefferson being engaged in packing his books will thank Dr. Rush for the volumes lent him if he had done with them. He presents him his best compliments. Douignan de la vie humaine. 2. vols. Compendium of Physic. RC ( DLC : Rush Papers); addressed: “Dr. Rush”; endorsed by Rush. Not recorded in SJL . The first book TJ requested was Guillaume Daignan, Tableau des Variétés de la Vie humaine...
26 June 1794. Encloses Heinrich Matthias Marcard’s letter to GW of 5 Aug. 1793, which GW gave to Randolph "with a request that I should answer it." As Marcard’s letter takes "distinguished notice" of Rush and "opens the way for some other pen, than an official one," to respond, Randolph asks Rush to reply to the letter. LB , DNA : RG 59, Domestic Letters. Rush wrote Randolph on 27 June that he...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to Dr. Rush and will be happy if he can take a dinner with him in the country with a small party of friends on Friday at three aclock.—He presumes Dr. Rush knows that his house is on this side the river 3, or 400 yds. below Grey’s ferry. RC (J. William Middendorf, Jr., Baltimore, 1949); addressed: “Dr. Rush.” Not recorded in SJL .
I have persecuted you, too much with my letters.—I beg you would give yourself no trouble to answer them, but when you are quite at leisure, from more important Business or more agreable amusements. I deny, that there is or ever was in Europe a more free Republic than England, or that any Liberty on Earth ever equalled English liberty, notwithstanding the defects in their Constitution. The...
I recd. your favor of the 10th. instant some days ago. Altho’ I feel the force of many of your remarks, I can not embrace the idea to which they lead. It would not be consistent with the view I have taken of the subject; nor indeed promise any chance of success agst. the present politics of the House. The Petitions on the subject of Slavery have employed more than a week, and are still before...
I had heard before I recd your Letter of the 12th, of your new Engagements in the Colledge added to your extensive Practice and other virtuous Pursuits: and therefore was at no loss to account for your long Silence. I have no Pretensions to the Merit of your manly and successful opposition to the Constitution of Pensilvania: but I am very willing to be responsible, for any Consequences of its...
… Your hint as to addresses from the H. of Rep. to the National Assembly was perfectly new. I am far from thinking that such a measure might not be formed as [to] do credit to this Country and good to both…. Printed extract (Parke-Bernet Catalogue No. 468, “The Alexander Biddle Papers” [1943], pt. 1, item 151). See PJM Robert J. Brugger et al., eds., The Papers of James Madison: Secretary of...
I have read Dr Rush, de moribus Germanorum, with pleasure. As I am a great lover of paradoxes, when defended with ingenuity, I have read also the Phillippic against Latin and Greek, with some amusement: but my reverence for those Languages, and the inestimable treasures hoarded up in them is not abated. Jean Jaques Rousseau’s phillippic against the arts and sciences amused informed and charmed...
I recieved yesterday your kind favor of the 4th. inst. and the eulogium it covered on the subject of our late invaluable friend Rittenhouse, and I perused it with the avidity and approbation which the matter and manner of every thing from your pen has long taught me to feel. I thank you too for your congratulations on the public call on me to undertake the 2d. office in the US. but still more...
3 May 1790, New York. “Your hint as to addresses from the H. of Rep. to the National Assembly was perfectly new. I am far from thinking that such a measure might not be formed as do credit to this Country and good to both.” Printed extract (Parke-Bernet Catalogue No. 468, “The Alexander Biddle Papers” [1943], pt. 1, item 151). See Rush to JM, 24 Apr. 1790 , PJM William T. Hutchinson et al.,...
The Tories, are not only more united and attached to each other as you observe in your Letter of the 24th, but they are more skilful Politicians than the Whigs. They understand better how to influence the public opinion.—The Whigs never during the War, or at the Peace made the most of their own Actions as the Tories always do. it is really ridiculous to observe the Simplicity of our good...
Altho’ your last favour of the 27 Ult: does not require any particular answer, I can not let this occasional correspondence drop, without thanking you for so interesting a supplement to your former remarks on the subject lately decided in the House of Representatives. It not only gives me pleasure, but strengthens my conviction, to find my sentiments ratified by those of enlightened and...
The Tories as you observe in your friendly Letter of 24 Feb. are more attached to each other; they are also, We must candidly confess, more of real Politicians. They make to themselves more merit with the People, for the smallest services, than the Whigs are able to do for the greatest. The Arts the Tr umpetts the Puffs, are their old Instruments and they know how to employ them. The History...
I am just favored with your Eulogium on Docr. Cullen which from the taste of a page or two promises me an elegant treat. I am glad of the opportunity of repaying it with the inclosed Report of Mr. Jefferson on a Standard of weights &c. which can not fail to please all those who set a due value on public reformations, and see the aids to be derived to them from a regard to philosophic...
I thank you my dear Sir for the obliging communications in your letter of the 10th Sepr. which I have but just recd; and am pleased to find your hopes so much re-animated by the aspect of our affairs. Much if not all may depend on the choice of an independent and virtuous representation for Penna. The enemies of republicanism seem aware of this, and to be exhausting their artifices to mislead...
Without waiting for an answer to my last, I will take a little more notice of a Sentiment in one your letters. You say you "abhor all Titles." I will take the familiar freedom of Friendship to say I don’t believe you.—Let me explain my self.—I doubt not your veracity, but I believe you deceive yourself, and have not yet examined your own heart, and recollected the feelings of every day and...
Your single principle, in your letter of the 15th. must fail you you say "that Republican Systems have never had a fair Tryal” what do you mean by a fair tryal? and what by republican systems—Every Government that has more than one man in its soverignty is a republican system. Tryals inumerable have been Made as many as there have existed Nations. There is not and never was, I believe on Earth...
Your Letter of April 13, Soars above the visible diurnal sphere.—I own to you that Avarice Ambition the Love of Fame &c are all mysterious Passions. They are the greatest absurdities, Delusions and Follies that can be imagined, if in this Life only We had hope. In the Boat on our Return from Point no Point, the principal Topick of Conversation was Independence —An intercepted Letter early in...
Permit me to introduce to you the Bearer Count Andreani a young nobleman from Milan, who after traversing Europe with a philosophical curiosity, is prompted by the same motive to visit America. You will find him well informed on many subjects, particularly on mineralogy and chemistry, and not more recommended to your esteem by his science, than he is by his agreeable manners to your...
Your favor of March 19th deserves a particular consideration and answer which I have not til now been able from a multitude of avocations some frivolous, others indispensable, been others of more Consequence, to give it—the Influence which you Suppose I may have as President of the Senate will be found to be very little if any at all—You say the Eastern States must not be suspected: But you...
“The Characters I so much admire among the ancients.” were not “formed wholly by Republican forms of government."—I admire, Phillip and Alexander, as much as I do Themistocles and Pericles, nay as much as Demosthenes—I admire Pisistratus, almost as much as Solon: and think that the Arts, Elegance, Literature and Science of Athens, was his work, and that of his sons, more than of any or all the...
[ Treasury Department, August 13, 1792. The dealer’s catalogue description of this letter reads: “Respecting proposed method for obtaining fresh water from salt water.” Letter not found. ] ALS , sold at Parke-Bernet Galleries, Inc., May 24, 1943, Lot 117. Rush, who had been a member of the Pennsylvania Ratifying Convention, was a prominent Philadelphia physician and philanthropist. He was...