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Your last letter come to hand was of May 23. Consequently it is now two months old. Petit arrived here three or four days ago, and accosted me with an assurance that he was come pour rester toujours avec moi. The principal small news he brings is that Panthemont is one of the convents to be kept up for education, that the old Abbess is living, but Madame de Taubenheim dead, that some of the...
Maria’s letter of July 16. informs me you were all well then. However great my confidence is in the healthy air of Monticello, I am always happy to have my hopes confirmed by letter. The day of my departure is not yet fixed. I hope it will be earlier or later in the first week of September. I know not as yet how I am to get along, as one of my horses is in such a condition as to leave little...
Maria and myself are waiting with impatience to hear that Mr. Randolph and yourself and dear little Anne are well. We now write alternately, once a week, so that the correspondence is become more equal. I now inclose to Mr. Randolph Freneau’s paper instead of Bache’s on account of the bulk of the latter which, being a daily paper, was too much for the post. And Freneau’s two papers contain...
We are well here, tho’ still without news from Mr. Randolph or yourself, tho’ we have been eight weeks from Monticello. Maria was to have written to you to-day, but she has been so closely engaged in pasting paper together in the form of a pocket book that she has not been able. She has been constantly getting colds since she came here. I have put on board Capt Stratton a box with the...
Your’s of Nov. 29. and Mr. Randolph’s of Nov. 28. came to hand five days ago. They brought us the first news we had received from Monticello since we left it. A day or two after, Mr. Millar of Charlottesville arrived here and gave us information of a little later date, and particularly of Colo. Lewis and Mrs. Gilmer’s illness. His account of Mrs. Gilmer was alarming, and I am anxious to hear...
Having no particular subject for a letter, I find none more soothing to my mind than to indulge itself in expressions of the love I bear you, and the delight with which I recall the various scenes thro which we have passed together, in our wanderings over the world. These reveries alleviate the toils and inquietudes of my present situation, and leave me always impressed with the desire of...
I was prevented writing to you last week by a bad cold attended with fever: and this week I have nothing to say but that I find myself nearly well, and to repeat the assurances of my love to you. Maria is well, and has come to a resolution to write to you no more. Whether this arises most from resentment or laziness I do not know. Mr. Randolph’s last letter received was of Dec. 29, yours of...
We are in daily expectation of hearing of your safe return to Monticello, and all in good health. The season is now coming on when I shall envy your occupations in the feilds and garden, while I am shut up drudging within four walls. Maria is well and lazy, therefore does not write. Your friends Mrs. Trist and Mrs. Waters are well also, and often enquire after you. We have nothing new or...
Yours of Feb. 20. came to me with that welcome which every thing brings from you. It is a relief to be withdrawn from the torment of the scenes amidst which we are. Spectators of the heats and tumults of conflicting parties, we cannot help participating of their feelings. I should envy you the tranquil occupations of your situation were it not that I value your happiness more than my own. But...
Mr. Randolph’s letter of the 18th. has been received since my last. The one it covered for Great Britain is sent by the packet now about to sail from New York. His commission to Doctor Barton shall be fulfilled to-day. Maria is with me keeping her Easter holidays. She is well. She allows herself to write but one letter a week, and having written to some acquaintance already she has nothing but...
I received yesterday your’s and Mr. Randolph’s of the 9th. which shews that the post somehow or other slips a week. Congress have determined to rise on the 5th. of May. Colo. Monroe and Mrs. Monroe will set out on the 7th. and making a short stay at Fredericksburg pass on to Albemarle. I have reason to expect that my visit to Virginia this year, instead of September as heretofore, will be...
Excess of business prevented my writing to you the last week or even having time to inclose the papers to Mr. Randolph. Since my last I have received yours of Feb. 28. and Mr. Randolph’s of Apr. 9. 16. and May 4. Congress rose three days ago. Colo. Monroe sets out three days hence, and by him I shall send your watch, and the 2d. part of Payne’s Rights of man for Mr. Randolph. Also, for...
I was too much occupied to write by Friday’s post and fear it will occasion your recieving my letter a week later. Yours of the 7th. Inst. has come duly to hand. Colo. and Mrs. Monroe will probably be with you by the time you recieve this. Mr. Madison left us last Wednesday. I have promised, during his stay in Orange, to inclose to him Fenno’s paper for his perusal, to be forwarded on to Mr....
The last news we have from Monticello is by your letter of May 7. I am in hopes tomorrow’s post will bring us something, for some how or other your letters (if you write by post to Richmond) miss a post and are sometimes a week longer coming than they ought to be.—The news from the French West India islands is more and more discouraging. Swarms of the inhabitants are quitting them and coming...
Yours of May 27. came to hand on the very day of my last to you, but after it was gone off. That of June 11. was received yesterday. Both made us happy in informing us you were all well. The rebuke to Maria produced the inclosed letter. The time of my departure for Monticello is not yet known. I shall within a week from this time send off my stores as usual that they may arrive before me. So...
I now inclose you Petit’s statement of the stores sent round to Richmond to the care of Mr. Brown. They sailed from hence yesterday morning, and the winds have been and are so favorable that I dare say they will be in Chesapeak bay tomorrow, ready for the first Southernly breeze to carry them up the river. So that they will probably be at Richmond some days before you receive this. I wrote to...
Yours of the 2d came yesterday. I wrote to Mr. Randolph two days ago, but by a bungle of the servant it did not get to the post office in time, so I suppose that and this will get to hand together, and both probably only the evening before I shall reach Monticello. Still should my former one desiring horses, have missed, this will be in time for them to meet me on the road, and relieve mine in...
Having not received a letter by yesterday’s post, and that of the former week from Mr. Randolph having announced dear Anne’s indisposition, I am under much anxiety. In my last letter to Mr. Randolph I barely mentioned your being recovered, when somewhat younger than she is, by recurrence to a good breast of milk. Perhaps this might be worthy of proposing to the Doctor. In a case where weakness...
The last post day for Monticello, which was the 9th. slipt by me without my recollecting it. However as you are perhaps in Cumberland, a letter of this day may get to you only three days the later. I have nothing indeed to tell you but that I love you dearly, and your dear connections, that I am well, as is Maria. I hope your little one has felt no inconvenience from the journey, that Anne is...
The last letter received from Mr. Randolph or yourself is of Oct. 7. which is near seven weeks ago. I ascribe this to your supposed absence from Monticello, but it makes me uneasy when I recollect the frail state of your two little ones. I hope some letter is on the way to me. I have no news for you except the marriage of your friend Lady Elizabeth Tufton, to some very rich person, but whose...
I have this day received yours of the 18th. November and sincerely sympathize with you on the state of dear Anne, if that can be called sympathy which proceeds from affection at first hand, for my affections had fastened on her for her own sake and not merely for yours. Still however experience (and that in your own case) has taught me that an infant is never desperate, let me beseech you not...
By capt. Swaile, who sailed yesterday for Richmond I sent addressed to Mr. Randolph to the care of Mr. Brown a box containing the following articles for your three house maids. 2. peices of linen. 52. yards 9. pair cotton stockings (3 of them small) 13. yds. cotton in three patterns 36. yards Calimanco. 9. yards muslin. Bob is to have a share of the linen. I had promised to send him a new suit...
I received three days ago Mr. Randolph’s letter of the 14th. from Richmond, and received it with great joy as it informed me of the reestablishment of dear Anne’s health. I apprehend from an expression in his letter that some of mine may have miscarried. I have never failed to write every Thursday or Friday. Percieving by the Richmond paper that the Western post now leaves that place on...
Mr. Randolph’s letter of Dec. 20. from Richmond is the only one come to hand from him or you since your’s from Bizarre of two months ago. Tho’ his letter informed me of the re-establishment of Anne, yet I wish to learn that time confirms our hopes. We were entertained here lately with the ascent of Mr. Blanchard in a baloon . The security of the thing appeared so great that every body is...
I received two days ago your’s of the 16th. You were never more mistaken than in supposing you were too long on the prattle &c. of little Anne. I read it with quite as much pleasure as you write it. I sincerely wish I could hear of her perfect reestablishment.—I have for some time past been under an agitation of mind which I scarcely ever experienced before, produced by a check on my purpose...
The hour of post is come and a throng of business allows me only to inform you we are well, and to acknolege the receipt of Mr. Randolph’s letter of Jan. 24. With hopes that you are all so accept assurances of constant love to you all from your’s my dear most affectionately RC ( NNP ); at foot of text: “Mrs. Randolph”; endorsed by Mrs. Randolph. PrC ( CSmH ). Tr ( ViU : Edgehill-Randolph...
We have no letter from Monticello since Mr. Randolph’s of Jan. 30. to Maria. However we hope you are all well and that there are letters on the road which will tell us so. Maria writes to-day. Congress will rise on Saturday next, a term which is joyous to all as it affords some relaxation of business to all. We have had the mildest winter ever known, having had only two snows to cover the...
Your letters of the 20th. and 27th. Feb. as well as Mr. Randolph’s of the same dates, came to hand only yesterday. By this I percieve that your post must be under bad regulation indeed. I am sorry to learn that your garden is dismantled, and yourself thereby discoraged from attention to it. I beg that Mr. Randolph will employ the whole force, he has been so kind as to direct, in repairing the...
I have nothing interesting to tell you from hence but that we are well, and how much we love you. From Monticello you have every thing to write about which I have any care. How do my young chesnut trees? How comes on your garden? How fare the fruit blossoms &c. I sent to Mr. Randolph, I think, some seed of the Bent-grass which is much extolled. I now inclose you some seed which Mr. Hawkins...
Since my letter of the last week, Maria has received one from Mr. Randolph which lets us know you were all well. I wish I could say the same. Maria has for these three or four weeks been indisposed with little fevers, nausea, want of appetite, and is become weak. The Doctor thinks it proceeds from a weakness of the stomach, and that it will soon be removed.—I learn from the head of Elk that a...
I am now very long without a letter from Monticello, which is always a circumstance of anxiety to me. I wish I could say that Maria was quite well. I think her better for this week past, having for that time been free from the little fevers which had harrassed her nightly.—A paper which I some time ago saw in the Richmond gazette under the signature of R.R. proved to me the existence of a...
I have at length found time to copy Petit’s list of the packages sent to Richmond. Tho’ I have not heard of their arrival there, I take for granted they must be arrived. I inclose you the list wherein I have marked with an * the boxes which must remain at Richmond till they can be carried up by water, as to put them into a waggon would be a certain sacrifice of them. They are the Nos. 2. 5....
PrC of Tr ( ViU : McGregor Library); undated; consists of two pages entirely in TJ’s hand, with asterisks and two words added in ink; badly faded in part and torn at folds and edges, resulting in the partial loss of several lines; brackets editorially supplied except for French words describing package No. 3 and English words throughout; printed literally. Preceding three words interlined....
Your and Mr. Randolph’s welcome favors of the 16th. came to hand yesterday, by which I perceive that your post-day for writing is the Thursday. Maria is here and, tho not in flourishing health, is well. I will endeavour to prevail on her to write, and perhaps may succeed, as the day is too wet to admit her saunters on the banks of the Schuylkill, where she passes every Sunday with me. We are...
I wrote you last on the 26th. of the last month. On the 3d. of the present I received Mr. Randolph’s favor of May 22. I sincerely congratulate you on the arrival of the Mocking bird. Learn all the children to venerate it as a superior being in the form of a bird, or as a being which will haunt them if any harm is done to itself or it’s eggs. I shall hope that the multiplication of the cedar in...
My head has been so full of farming since I have found it necessary to prepare a plan for my manager, that I could not resist the addressing my last weekly letters to Mr. Randolph and boring him with my plans.—Maria writes to you to-day. She is getting into tolerable health, tho’ not good. She passes two or three days in the week with me, under the trees, for I never go into the house but at...
We had peaches and Indian corn the 12th. instant. When do they begin with you this year?—Can you lay up a good stock of seed-peas for the ensuing summer? We will try this winter to cover our garden with a heavy coat of manure. When earth is rich it bids defiance to droughts, yeilds in abundance and of the best quality. I suspect that the insects which have harassed you have been encouraged by...
I inclose you two of Petit’s receipts. The orthography will amuse you, while the matter of them may be useful. The last of the two is really valuable, as the beans preserved in that manner, are as firm, fresh, and green, as when gathered.—Mr. D. Randolph is at Philadelphia, and well. He delivered me your watch, which I will have ready to send by him. He proposes to set out for Monticello in 8....
Pour faire des peches à l’eau-de-vie. Il faut essuyer les peches pour oter le duvet. Ensuite les piquer avec une fourchette dans 5. à 6. endroits. Vous faites bouiller de l’eau. Quand elle bout, vous jettez vos peches pour les blanchir, seulement. Laissez faire un bouillon. Ensuite vous les retirez, et mettez tout-de suite à l’eau froid. Vous les retirez de l’eau pour les egoutter. Vous faites...
Maria and I are scoring off the weeks which separate us from you. They wear off slowly, but time is sure tho’ slow. Mr. D. Randolph left us three days ago. He went by the way of Presquisle and consequently will not enrapture Mrs. Randolph till the latter end of the month. I wrote to Mr. Randolph sometime ago to desire he would send off Tom Shackleford or Jupiter or any body else on the 1st. of...
I received this day Mr. Randolph’s letter of Aug. 31. with the horse, rather thin, having performed his journey in 7. days. However I shall hope to recruit him before I set out. The servant gives a very good account of him. The President sets out the day after tomorrow for Mount Vernon, and will be back about the last of the month. Within 4 or 5. days or a week after his return I can set out....
I wrote, my dear Martha, by last week’s post to Mr. Randolph. Yesterday I received his of Oct. 31. The fever in Philadelphia has almost entirely disappeared. The Physicians say they have no new infections since the great rains which have fallen. Some previous ones are still to die or recover, and so close this tragedy. I think however the Executive will remain here till the meeting of...
This place being entirely clear of all infection, the members of Congress are coming into it without fear. The President moved in yesterday, as did I also. I have got comfortably lodged at the corner of 7th. and Market street.—Dr. Waters is returned; not well, but better. Still always Hectic. He and Mrs. Waters are just gone to housekeeping for the first time. Mrs. Trist is also returned to...
In my letter of this day fortnight to Mr. Randolph, and that of this day week to Maria, I mentioned my wish that my horses might meet me at Fredericksburg on the 12th. of January. I now repeat it, lest those letters should miscarry. The President made yesterday, what I hope will be the last set at me to continue; but in this I am now immoveable, by any considerations whatever. My books and...
I received yesterday yours and Mr. Randolph’s letters from Varina of the 15th. and 16th. inst. I had been in hopes that you would have come up from the Dover sale, but am sorry to find that the affairs of Varina will claim Mr. Randolph’s presence longer. In my last to him I asked the favor of him to remit the balance of Stras’s money (after taking out Mr. Lyle’s and Taylor’s) to Mr. Mussi in...
We are all well, and especially the children, who will forget you if you do not return soon. Jefferson is under daily discipline with our puppy. He mends a little of his fears, but very slowly. We have been all kept much within doors by a spell of very cold weather which has now lasted about 4. weeks. During this no ploughing done. The men Mr. Randolph hired for me arrived last Saturday with...
We have had no letter from you since your arrival at the Warmsprings, but are told you are gone on to the sweet springs. Not knowing how to write to you by post, I take the opportunity of sending this by Dr. Currie.—He has mentioned to me the home-less situation of Nancy Randolph . She is now with Mrs. Carrington. I do not know whether she is on such a footing with Mr. Randolph and yourself as...
After the departure of my last letter to Mr. Randolph I found the details I had given him respecting the waggon were erroneous. The rise of the river had cut off our communications for several days. I presume it arrived at Varina as soon as my letter. We are all well here. Jefferson particularly so. He is become the finest boy possible. Always in good humor, always amusing himself, and very...
We are all well here, my dear daughter, and Jefferson particularly so. He often repeats that you told a story, ‘that you did,’ when you got into the carriage and said you would come back for him. His cheeks swell with emphasis as he asseverates this. We are just beginning our demolitions, and find they will be very troublesome. It was high time to do it, from the rotten state in which we found...
Our neighborhood my dear daughter furnishes us with not one word of news to you, and I am so fatigued with writing for this post that I can only inform you we are all well, Jefferson robust as a beef, and all our desires alive to see you. My kisses to dear Anne, and best affection’s to Mr. Randolph and yourself. Adieu my dear and love me as I do you. RC ( NNPM ); addressed: “Mrs. Martha...