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Will you be so good as to read the inclosed Letter from Dr. Belknap and tell me, from your Recollection of what passed in Congress in 1779 1780 & 1781, whether there is any Colour for the Imputation cast on our Country by Dr Kippis. I cannot say as Dr Belknap has been informed that Dr Kippis is my Correspondent. I never wrote a Letter to him or received a Letter from him that I recollect.—I...
I thank you My Dear Sir for the line you was so obliging as to leave for me and for the loan of the book accompanying it; in which I have not yet made sufficient progress to judge of its merit. I dont know how it was but I took it for granted that you had left town much earlier than you did; else I should have found an opportunity after your adjournment to converse with you on the subjects...
You will oblige me by taking the trouble to peruse the Report which accompanies this; and if the weather permit, I will call upon you sometime tomorrow or next day to converse on the subject of it. I remain with great esteem and regard   D Sir Yr Obed ser It will not be disagreeable to me if after perusal you hand it over to Mr. Jefferson. ALS , University of Virginia. Presumably this is a...
Notwithstanding the conviction I am under of the labour which is imposed upon you by Public Individuals as well as public bodies—yet, as you have begun, so I could wish you to finish, the good work in a short reply to the Address of the House of Representatives (which I now enclose) that there may be an accordance in this business. Thursday 12 Oclock, I have appointed to receive the Address....
The enclosed were communicated to me, as you will perceive, to make a confidential use of—upon receipt of the first letter, I expressed a desire to be informed (if there was nothing improper in it) through what channel the report came, and what reliance could be placed in the authenticity of it—This gave rise to the second letter —As you are upon business which requires every information of...
To draw such a line for the conduct of the President as will please every body, I know is impossible; but to mark out and follow one (which by being consonant with reason) will meet general approbation, may be as practicable as it is desireable. The true medium I conceive must lye in pursuing such a course as will allow him time for all the official duties of his station—This should be the...
Mr Madison having been so obliging as to draw the answer to the address of the House of Representatives—G.W. would thank him for doing the same to that of the Senate. If he receives it any time this day or tomorrow morning it will be sufficient. AL , DLC : Madison Papers. The date of this document is conjectural. Madison docketed the letter—apparently some years after the fact—“G. Washington...
As far as a momentary consideration has enabled me to judge, I see nothing exceptionable in the proposed amendments. Some of them, in my opinion, are importantly necessary; others, though of themselves (in my conception) not very essential, are necessary to quiet the fears of some respectable characters and well meaning men. Upon the whole, therefore, not foreseeing any evil consequences that...
As the Communications herewith enclosed will not take much time to read; As there are matters related which to me are new; and as the information respecting land transactions, and other things in the Western Country will require to be noticed & acted upon in some way or another, I send them to you together with a Gazette with a marked paragraph containing some suggestions that have not, I...
I want to communicate two matters to Congress; the substance of which is contained in the enclosed Paper —The first requires to be decided upon before the proposed adjournment shall take place—but my motive for communicating the other, at this time, is only to fix the attention, & to promote enquiry against the next meeting. Whether would an oral or written communication be best? If the first...
Consequent of the enclosed resolution, I had a conference with the Commee therein named yesterday, when I expressed the Sentiments which you also have enclosed. I was assured by the Committee, that the only object the Senate had in view was to be informed of the mode of communication which would be most agreeable to the President, and that a perfect acquiescence would be yielded thereto. But I...
Confidential The points which at present occur to me, and on which I wish your aid, are brought to view in the enclosed statement—I give you the trouble of receiving this evening that you may (if other matter do not interfere) suffer them to run through your Mind between this and tomorrow afternoon when I shall expect to see you at the appointed time. Besides the enclosed Would it do now that...
My solicitude for drawing the first characters of the Union into the Judiciary, is such that, my cogitations on this subject last night (after I parted with you) have almost determined me (as well for the reason just mentioned, as to silence the clamours, or more properly, soften the disappointment of smaller characters[)]—to nominate Mr Blair and Colo. Pendleton as Associate & District...
In obedience to the command of the President of the United States, I have the honor to enclose you a Letter from Peyton Short Esquire resigning his Commission of Collecter of the Port of Louisville in Kentucky, & to request that you will be so good as to consult with Mr Brown, and any other Gentlemen from Virginia who are acquainted with characters in that part of the Country, upon a suitable...
I return Mr Jefferson’s letter with thanks for the perusal of it. I am glad he has resolved to accept the appointment of Secretary of State, but sorry it is so repugnant to his own inclinations that it is done. Sincerely & Affectly I am—Yrs ALS , NjP : Straus Autograph Collection. Madison had undoubtedly shown GW the letter Jefferson had written to him from Monticello on 14 Feb. 1790. The...
If the weather will permit, & Mr Madison’s health suffer him to go out to day, the Presdt would be glad if he would give him a call before he goes to the House. Transcript, MH : Jared Sparks Collection. Madison was ill with influenza during the last week or so of April but was well enough to consult with GW on 27 April about the Foreign Intercourse Act ( Diaries Donald Jackson and Dorothy...
If Mr Madison is at leisure the P. would be glad to see him. AL , NjP : George Washington Collection. GW’s purpose in requesting this meeting is not known. It may have been to discuss his upcoming address to Congress (see GW to the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives, 8 Dec. 1790 ).
Let me entreat you to finish the good Offices you have begun for me, by giving short answers (as can be with propriety) to the enclosed addresses—I must have them ready by Monday. AL , PWacD . The enclosures, which have not been found, were undoubtedly advance copies of the formal replies of the House and the Senate to GW’s address of 8 Dec. 1790 . For the text of these replies and GW’s brief...
Enclosed are the last dispatches I have rec’d from Mr Gouvr Morris. As they unfold, pretty evidently I think, the disposition of the British Ministry, I wish you to see them—Pray return them to me in the course of this day. Sincerely & Affectly, I am Yrs ALS , anonymous donor. The enclosures almost certainly included Gouverneur Morris’s letters of 18 and 21 Sept. 1790 reporting the failure of...
Letter not found: to James Madison, 10 Oct. 1791. Sold by Stan V. Henkels, 1892, catalog 694, item 63.
Enclosed I return you the list of Sales in the Federal City. You will oblige me, by drafting a short answer to the address, to be presented tomorrow, and sending it to me this Evening or in the Morning early. If you want the address let me know it & it shall be sent to you. Yours—Sincerely & Affectly ALS , H-Ar : Cartwright Collection. James Madison erroneously docketed the cover 22 Oct. 1791....
At as early an hour this evening as you can make it convenient, I should be glad to see you. yrs sincerely & affecly Sparks transcript , MH . The only year of GW’s presidency in which 13 Dec. fell on a Tuesday was 1791.
If Mr Madison could make it convenient to spare half an hour from other matters, G. W. would be glad to see him at 11 oclock to day. AL (photocopy), NjP : Armstrong Photostats; AL , sold by Christie, Manson & Woods, International, Inc, 1993. No evidence has been found confirming the subject of this meeting.
If Mr Madison can make it convenient to call upon the P——between eight and nine this forenoon and spend half an hour it would oblige him. If inconvenient, then at Six in the Afternoon. AL , PWacD .
As there is a possibility if not a probability, that I shall not see you on your return home; or, if I should see you, that it may be on the Road and under circumstances which will prevent my speaking to you on the subject we last conversed upon; I take the liberty of committing to paper the following thoughts, & requests. I have not been unmindful of the sentiments expressed by you in the...
The calamitous situation of Philadelphia and the little prospect from present appearances of its eligibility to receive Congress by the first monday in Decembr involves a serious difficulty. It has been intimated by some, that the President ought, by Proclamation, to convene Congress a few days before the above period, at some other place—and by others, (although in extraordinary cases he has...
Herewith you will receive Sundry Pamphlets &ca under the patronage of Sir John Sinclair. I send you his letters to me also, that the design may be better understood. From all these, you will be able to decide, whether a plan of enquiry similar to the one set on foot in G. Britn, would be likely to meet legislative or other encouragement, and of what kind, in this Country. These, or any other...
The Agricultural Society of Philadelphia, are preparing the “out lines of a Plan for establishing a state Society of Agriculture in Pennsylvania” to be laid before the Legislature. Mr Peters—to whom sometime ago I mentioned the Pamphlets &ca which had been sent me by Sir John Sinclair; & who is appointed to prepare the business for the Legislature—wishes to have the perusal of those...
The papers, of which I was speaking to you on friday evening, are herewith sent. In looking over Sir John Sinclair’s letter (since I spoke to you on this subject) I perceive it is to a Committee I am at liberty to communicate the extracts. This, however, I consider as sufficient authority to give you the perusal of them; as the project, if it can be accomplished, in this country, must be put...
The enclosed letters, with the additional explanation that follows, will bring the case of young Fayette fully to your view. From the receipt of Mr Cabots letter until the latter end of Octr, I had not heard from, or of the young Gentleman. Then, a letter from Colo. Hamilton, to whom as you will see by Mr Cabots letter he had been introduced, informed me that he and his Tutor were in a retired...
I thank you for forwarding Mr Campbells letter; & whenever I shall have the pleasure of seeing you (for I would not put you to the trouble of calling for that purpose only) I will converse with you upon the subject of it. I confess, in the meantime, that I do not see upon what ground the application is made, to me. I can hardly suppose, Congress will disband the Troops now in Service, and...
As you are knowing to the situation of young Mr Fayette; to the measures I have adopted in his behalf; to my wishes towards him; and to the restraints under which those wishes have been placed, from considerations of a public nature. And as I am unacquainted with the ground work, or the tendency of the motion made by Mr Livingston, relative to this young gentleman; I flatter myself, that in...
The President of the United States requests, the Pleasure of Mr Madison’s Company to Dine, on Thursday next, at 4 o’Clock. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
The President of the United States, requests the Pleasure of Mr Madison’s Company to Dine, on Thursday next, at 4 o’Clock. An answer is requested. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
Letter not found. 3 May 1789. Acknowledged in JM to Pendleton, 17 May 1789 . The list probably kept by Peter Force (DLC: Madison Miscellany) notes that Pendleton wrote a two-page letter to JM from Virginia on this day. The summary reads: “Organization of the new government. Mr. Madison’s proposition for making provision for revenue. Virginia’s disqualifying act. Anti-federal State Elections....
Mr. Peter Carr will deliver this. He has taken the opportunity of the Spring Vacation, to visit New York, but is apprehensive you may not immedy. recollect him, & has therefore desired me to notify him to you. I am greatly obliged for your Favour of the 19h. Apl., and am happy to find, you have not only entered upon the arduous Task of legislating for this extended Continent, but that there...
Notwithstanding the conviction I am under of the labour which is imposed upon you by Public Individuals as well as public bodies—Yet, as you have began, so I would wish you to finish, the good work in a short reply to the Address of the House of Representatives (which I now enclose) that there may be an accordance in this business. Thursday 12 O’clock, I have appointed to receive the Address....
It was with great pleasure that I received the accounts of your election; this satisfaction has been made compleat by finding so great a majority of friends to the new Government in the list of members. Do not its enemies acknowledge this to be a sufficient evidence of the disposition and sentiments of the people at large? I am more fully satisfied every day that the opposition proceeded in a...
No safe opportunity offering, the letter for Mr. Nelson has not been forwarded, and I shall now reserve it for him untill the chancery term commences which will be in a day or two —those from Mr. Jefferson have been attended to, the one to Dr. Currie I have delivered, that for Mr. Lewis met a ready conveyance by Mr. Bob Nelson who was here, when it came to hand, on his way to Charlottesville,...
My last to you was of the 15th. of March. I am now in hourly expectation of recieving my leave of absence. The delay of it a little longer will endanger the throwing my return into the winter, the very idea of which is horror itself to me. I am in hopes this is the last letter I shall have the pleasure of writing you before my departure. The madness of the king of England has gone off, but...
The enclosed were communicated to me (as you will perceive) to make a Confidential use of. Upon receipt of the first letter I expressed a desire to be informed (if there was nothing improper in it) through what channel the report came, and what reliance could be placed in the authenticity of it. This produced the sec’d letter. As you are upon business which requires every information of the...
I had the pleasure to receive your favor of the 8th. Ult. inclosing the application of William Mason. I did transmit to Colo. Merewether certain papers of this Man and long ago informed him that they were insufficient to establish his claim which recd. no aid from the Muster Rolls of the Army. I do not now recollect signing the Rect. of which he sends a Copy, but it is highly probable I did,...
To draw such a line for the conduct of the President as will please every body, I know is impossible; but to mark out and follow one (which by being consonant with reason) will meet general approbation, may be as practicable as it is desireable. The true medium I conceive must lye in pursuing such a course as will allow him time for all the official duties of his station. This should be the...
Letter not found. 15 May 1789. Acknowledged in JM to Eliza House Trist, 21 May 1789 . Reports illness of her son, Hore Browse Trist.
Letter not found. 16 May 1789. Calendared in the lists probably kept by Peter Force (DLC: Madison Miscellany). The three-page letter was offered for sale in the Stan. V. Henkels Catalogue No. 694 (1892), which listed items from the McGuire collection of JM’s papers.
Mr. Madison having been so obliging as to draw the answer to the Address of the House of Representatives—GW. would thank him for doing the same to that of the Senate. If he receives it any time this day or tomorrow morning it will be sufficient. RC ( DLC ); Tr ( MH ). Late in life JM docketed the RC : “G. Washington without date—(perhaps 1789,) 90 or 91.” Fitzpatrick ( Writings of Washington ,...
While I acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 10th. instant, I must assign as my apology for forgetting to answer the legal question, that a variety of family sickness has taken away a cool attention to business. The deed, to which the inclosed memorandum relates was executed in France. The following extract from a law of the revised code, intituled an act for regulating conveyances,...
At Baltimore & Norfolk and wherever I touched since I left New York I have heard Complaints that Molasses was to be taxed six Cents. This is what I did not expect in southern States, but they say that Molasses is a necessary Part of food for the Poor. In Virginia the Complaints I have heard are very loud that the Vessels of Foreigners not treating are only taxed 50 Cents. This trifling Tax...
I am just informed by Govr Johnston that a Treaty is to be held on the 24th Inst at french Broad by the Indian Agent for the southern Departmt & the three Commissioners from the States of Georgia South Carolina & North Carolina. That Sevier lately called Governor of an insurgented State has submitted to the Govt of North Carolina and taken the accustomed Oaths. There is an End to the new, so...
Mr. Carroll presents his complits to Mr. Madison returns him the inclosed estimate, & is much obliged to Mr. Madison for the perusal of it. Quere how the deficiency on this branch of revenue is to be made good? Would not an excise on ardent spirits, foreign & domestic be adviseable? Stamp duties I hope may be collected to defray the expence of the federal Judiciary. RC ( DLC ). Addressed by...