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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Johnson, Thomas" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
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I am ashamed, so much after the date of it, to have the receipt of your letter of the 15th of Decr to acknowledge; but truth being the best apology I can make for the omission, you will receive it as follow. Immediately upon the receipt of that letter, I sent it where all other letters relative to the same subject were referred, to the Secretary of War, who was in the act of investigating...
I discovered, after my letter of the 24 with its enclosure, was sent to the Post Office, that it would have to remain in Baltimore until friday, before it would be taken up by the cross-post for Frederick Town. This will occasion a delay on which I had not calculated: and as the return Post from the last mentioned place may not be immediate, the intention of this letter is to request the favor...
The Office of Secretary of State is vacant—occasioned by the resignation of Mr Randolph. Will you accept it? You know my wishes of old, to bring you into the Administration —Where then is the necessity of repeating them? No time more than the present, ever required the aid of your abilities—nor of the old and proved patriots of this Country. To have yours would be pleasing to me, and I verily...
Your favor of the 15th Ulto, came to my hands at a time when my attention was much occupied on some matters of importance. To this circumstance, and to my knowledge (as you will perceive by the enclosed extract of a letter from the Secretary of State to the Commissioners of the federal city) that one of your requests had been anticipated; and to the expression of your apprehension, that...
About the 20th of last month I received a letter from you dated at George Town the 12th of Jany—but which, I presume, ought to have been dated the 12th of February. It came to hand at a time when the Session of Congress was drawing to a close, and of course when the business of it pressed upon me. I therefore laid it aside to be acknowledged by Mr Potts, but missing that opportunity, I was...
I regret not having met you at the Federal City, on my way home; and was concerned for the cause of the disappointment. I have made no choice yet of persons to supply the places of yourself & Doctr Stuart, as Commissioners; nor, in truth, do I know on whom to fix for this purpose, at this stage of the business, & under present circumstances. Mr Greenleaf gave me some reasons to believe that...
Your letter of the 6th instant came Safe, but not until after it had lain many days in the Post Office in Frederick Town, by the mark thereon. Your consenting to remain longer in the Commission of the Federal District gave me much pleasure; for although I have no doubt with respect to the accomplishment of the law (establishing the permanent residence of Congress), nor of the execution of the...
Your letter of the 23d Ulto came duly to hand. With regret I perceive your determination to with draw from the Commission under which you have acted—for executing the plan of the federal City. My wish was, and still is, if it could be made to comport with your convenience and inclination, that it should be changed; or at least suspended: for I should be sorry to see others (coming in at the...
While I acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 16th of January, I cannot but express the regret with which I received the resignation of your office of Associate Justice of the supreme Court, and sincerely lament the causes that produced it. It is unnecessary for me to say how much I should have been pleased, had your health & other circumstances permitted you to continue in office;...
I received your favor of Feb. 29. the day after I had written a public letter to the Commissioners, which touched on some of the subjects of yours. I may say in this private letter what could not be so well said in a public one, that there never was a moment’s doubt about parting with Major Lenfant rather than with a single commissioner.—I must correct an error in my public letter. I said...