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Mr. Silvester presents his most respectful compliments to the Vice President and acknowledges the receipt of his kind Invitation to dine with him on Fryday next But begs he would be so kind as to excuse him as Silvester is holding himself ready to return home as soon as he can consistantly after Thursday next— MHi : Adams-Hull Collection.
Mr. Burke presents his Compliments to the Vice=President and is sorry he cannot do himself the honor of dining with him, having been previously engaged— MHi : Adams-Hull Collection.
Mr. Clymer’s respectful compliments to the Vice president is sorry he cannot have the honor of dining with him on Thursday being engaged on that day— MHi : Adams-Hull Collection.
the early Friendship of our Youth, (which I am convinced will in your Mind apologize for the freedom I now presume to take), has induced me to address you on a Subject very interesting to the Prosperity & future Weal of the Country in which I reside—the Death of Judge Varnum, renders another Appointment necessary, many Candidates will doubtless present themselves, and it would be deemed...
Such Gentlemen of the Honl. Senate as would wish to be present at the exhibition of Fireworks to be displayed this evening, will find room within the railing of the Bowling Green, for their reception by / their most obedient / Humble Servant MHi : Adams Papers.
We had the pleasure of waiting on you in May & in Octr. As Pr: informing you by the latter of your good luck of your number 995. of the Obligato. of 4 per Ct. whch. had a price drawn of ƒ1000: —one thousand Guilds. among those drawn Last Year conform the agreemt. whch Should be at your disposal by Sending us a Receipt for the Same. tho’ we Continue Without any of your esteemed favors, we...
At the time you embark’d from America for Europe, on board the Boston Frigate Samuel Tucker Esquire Commander; I had the honour to be A Naval Lieutenant. Advanced in Life—steady in the public service—together with my Children, at present I find myself Embarrased with a large Family, and if my Conduct during your Excellencys observation of it, Was such as to induce Approbation, earnestly desire...
I received your kind favours of the 19 & 22 of April. the printers were very obliging in taking particular care to supply me daily with the paper’s by which I learnt the arrival and Reception of the Pressident, & vice Pressident. if I thought I could compliment in so courtly and masterly a stile, I would say that the address to the Senate was exactly what it ought to be, neither giving too...
A Stranger presumes most Respectfully to submit, the inclosed, to your Excellencies perusal and Patronage; they contain Facts, and he can for Information Concerning his Charactor, Exclusive of the Honorable Certificate, Appeal to Colonel Smith; (with whom he had the Honor to serve) for his early integrity in the American Cause. When divesting himself of all Views and Prospects which he might...
I am commanded by the House of Representatives to bring to the Senate the proceedings of the House on a resolution of the Senate of the 27th of April: Also, to communicate to the Senate the appointment of the Reverend William Lynn, D. D. to be one of the Chaplains to Congress, agreeably to the resolves of the 15th of April. Printed Source--Senate Journal.
The Memorial of Charles F. Weissenfels most respectfully Sheweth, that your Memorialist has very early initiated into the Military Service of the United States; and bore a Commission of Lieutt. and from the year One Thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy Six till end of the War, and has since been honoured with a Majority in the Militia of this City, which early initiation and the Series of Years...
Mr Dawes sent me word that he was going to Newyork this week. I would not omit any opportunity of writing to you, tho I know I must sometimes perplex you with domestick matters I would not do it, but that I wish your advise and direction. I wrote you in my last that the wall was compleated between mr Bass & you, and Barley has been sown. the Hill before the window, your Brother has had cleard...
The patriotism of the bearer, Capt. Gustavus Fellowes I believe has never been suspected, by long experience have found him a gentleman of strict probity, towards the close of the late war in his endeavours to annoy the common enemy he lost considerable property. He wishes to Serve his Country & himself by filling some Office under the general goverment, should thair be aney vacancy, & you...
With heartfelt pleasure I congratulate your Excellency on the auspicious Event of the Votes of the Electorrs of the United States. Permit me, Sir, to recommend the Bearer of this, my esteemed, Neighbour & Friend, Capt. Gustavus Fellowes, as a Gentleman of the best establish’d Character; whose merit, as it has, in times past, secured him universal Esteem & Confidence, render him now very worthy...
Brisler arrived last Evening and brought yours of May the 1 st I have not time to notice all I want to in it, I wish to know whether you would like that I should engage Daniel as coachman who drove you to Newyork when you get to House keeping, and what are the wages given. Tom we can never keep if we wish fer peace— would not the House out of Town be most agreeable to you and most for your...
our parson has been praying for you to day that you may be enabled to discharge the high and important Trust committed to you with equal integrity and abilitis as you have heretofore excercised in Negotiations at Foreign courts & embassies abroad, and with equal Benifit & satisfaction to your Country. I have been reading with attention the various addresses to the Pressident & his replies....
Presuming on the confidential and unremitting friendship that has long subsided between us,--grounded on the close connexion commenced with Mr Warren in the early part of your life,—I again address you, without waiting an answer to my last. According to you usual punctuality, I doubt not that will be done, as soon as the peculiar engagements which have lately occupied your attention, (the...
Since mine of Jan. 14. yours of Jan. 2. and Mar. 1. have been handed to me; the former by mr Jones, whom I am glad to know on your recommendation and to make him the channel of evidencing to you how much I esteem whatever comes from you. the internal agitations of this country & the inactivity to which England is reduced by the state of imbecility in which the madness of the king has...
The President of the United States wishes to avail himself of your sentiments on the following points. 1st Whether a line of conduct, equally distant from an association with all kinds of company on the one hand and from a total seclusion from Society on the other, ought to be adopted by him? and, in that case, how is it to be done? 2d What will be the least exceptionable method of bringing...
Since mine of Jan. 14. yours of Jan. 2. and Mar. 1. have been handed to me; the former by Mr. Jones, whom I am glad to know on your recommendation and to make him the channel of evidencing to you how much I esteem whatever comes from you.—The internal agitations of this country and the inactivity to which England is reduced by the state of imbecillity in which the madness of the king has...
You will pardon me for a few observations upon some apprehended arrangements by a Committee of Conference now in being— When Mr. Thomson was my competitor, it was a doctrine, that the Secretary of the Senate and the Secretary of State were inseparably blended by the Constitution and to elect other than Mr. Thomson Secretary of the Senate, would be an exclusion of him. The doctrine was admitted...
I persuade myself that even surrounded as you are with the Plaudits of a gratefull & Sensible Country, you will not be displeased to receive the heartfelt expressions of respect and esteem of an old friend, of one who has never ceased to love and admire you from the time he first saw you in Europe in the Service of his Country. I am my dear Sir now happily settled in business in this City in...
I have just received a letter from Dr Price, enclosing one to your Excellency, which he desires me to convey to you, and I now transmit it. Your Excellency may remember the application to you, respecting Dr Minto.—So many and weighty are the national affairs, in which you are engaged, that the Corporation can hardly expect that you should have opportunity to attend to the matter yourself; but...
The Memorial of Charles: F: Weissenfels Most Respectfully Sheweth: That he did presume to profer a Memorial to your Excellency, dated May 2d: wherein he discovered his wish to be appointed in a Military Command, for which Employ he professes a Superiour Inclination, but conceiving it at a distance for reasons that are Suggested to be best Calculated to Coincide with the Public good, he...
Permit me join in the United voice of America. Accept my sincere Congratulation on the Nomination to the High Office Confer’d on you by the Choice of a free People an Honor superior to any in the gift of Europe I hope in a few days to receive the Journals of the Opening and proceedings of Congress much more interesting than the Mock scheens of present Assembled States General of many of the...
Major Leonard Blecker Informs me that he has applyed for the office of Serjeant-at-Arms to the Senate of the United States and signified a desire that I would certify his services as they came within my knowledge—In one of the first Continental Regiments raised in the State of New York in 1775 Mr Blecker was appointed second Lieutenant in a Company of which I was Captain—In the Close of the...
Having been flatter’d by your Excellency’s good opinion and Obliging Offers of Service, Candour requires that I should be equally attentive to your views & wishes however contrary to my private Interest besides which I am sensible of the justice of Mr Storer’s pretentions and consequently averse to opposing his objects—As the Revenue system is yet incompleat it is impossible to ascertain what...
I yesterday received yours of May the 3 d by Captain Beal’s in which you request that I would come on imediatly Yours of May the first mentions several articles which you suppose it will be necessary for me to send forward, but add all is as yet uncertain, so that I am in doubt what to do, particularly as I have laid before you Since, a state of my difficulties to which I could have wish’t...
The President of the United States wishes to avail himself of your sentiments on the following points— 1st Whether a line of Conduct, equally distant from an association with all kinds of Company on the one hand, and from a total seclusion from Society on the other ought to be adopted by him?—and in that case how it is to be done? 2d: What will be the least exceptionable Method of bringing any...
Assurd of your Goodness of heart Emboldens me to Address your honour— Hearing that your Good Lady is to Come On from providence to york by Water & Conscious of haveing the best accomedated packet in That Line Induces me to Solicit the honour of Bringing Mrs Addams on & be Assured Good Sir that It Shall be my Whole Study to Accomedate her Ladyship if Mrs Addams Will Please to inform me by Line...
I have just been honored by the receipt of your favor of the 8th. instant—I have not time, as I must soon leave town to observe now on that part of it which is in answer to a sentiment of mind on which we seem I am to differ. There is no proposition, to which I can more fully accede than to the one which affirms how important it is to people that the President, the vice President, the Senate...
Your very obliging & confidential letters of the 3d. and 9th. of May I received on the 15. I mention their coming to my Hands together only to mark the difference between the Dispatch of the Post & the Punctuality of Individuals. I am rejoiced to find you, Sir, pronouncing the upper House of Congress a wise, mild and noble Body of Men. From such a Body we must find dignified, firm & national...
On the 6th. of this Month was held our General Election for Officers for the Ensuing Year; they are nearly the same as the East, saving a few more Federal Characters in the Lower-house. Their was Instructions from the Towns of Newport & Providence to their Deputies to use their Influence for the State Convention The Business was taken up, but we soon found their was no probability of...
As the Revenue Act has past the House & it is probable may now be before the Senate, I will take the freedom to hint to you the uneasiness that prevails here respecting the duty of 5 Cents fixed on Molasses, without permitting a drawback on the Rum exported to foreign Markets. 6 to 7000 Hhds. of Rum are exported from this State annually to foreign ports & the quantity is encreasing, as New...
Mr Duncan the Bearer will be easily recollected by you as the Gentleman at whose House we boarded in Philada. upon our Return from Baltimore. He has experienced various Fortune since that Time, and far from favorable in the last year. He is advised and influenced by some of his Friends to seek some Sort of Employment under Congress. Although I could not join in such Advice, yet I cannot...
I hope Barnard has arrived with the things which I sent by him. if there is any person in the House they had better be sent immediatly to it there to lie untill I arrive on the Recept of your Letter May 3’d I sent directly to Town and finding Barnard almost ready to sail I got him to take as many things as I could get ready, they are carpets linnen &c. after I had done this I sat out to visit...
Yesterday I took a post Chaise to pay my Respects to Mrs. Adams at Braintree, but She was gone on a Visit to Haverhill and expected back tomorrow, I left your letter and word if Mrs A wished to send to Capt Brown of the packet, I would forward it any letter or Write him myself—I find from the few that I have Conversed with, since my Return, that the General fear is, that the present Botes of...
I take the liberty favored by Dr. Bancroft to send you my book, as a small acknowledgment of the pleasure I have had in reading yours on Governmt, wch I think has advanced the subject more than any thing that has appeared since Montesquiu.—I wish it could be a little methodised & abridged, in some such way as mentioned in the monthly review, & some additions made for Spain & Portugal , where I...
I do myself the honour to represent to you, that having attended in this city many weeks in order to know what regulations might be established by the Impost Law, and finding that a considerable time must still elapse before the passing of that Act, I am induced, by the advice of my Freinds here, to return to my family, and, without incurring any farther expence, wait at home the issue of that...
I take the liberty of laying before you a memorial epistle, I have presented to the President Stating my right to presume upon the publick attention—As I have availed myself of an opportunity of mentioning your name, I think it my duty in appraising you of it, to solicit your patronage in support of those pretensions which you, sir in a great measure have put it in my power to claim. My long...
I hope you will pardon me for the freedom I took in addressing your Excellency by Colo. Ward.—I rejoice to hear by thereturne of that Gentleman that your Excellency is as well.—I meant to have had the honor of paying your my respects to you Sir at New York, but from the information received of the high price of living there, find I must relucktantly postpone that wishd for happiness at...
Until I met with your Letter to Day I could not conceive I had been so remiss as not before this Time to have acknowledged the Favour of it. It lay in Town for some Days & I was mortified at not receiving it soon enough to pay the wished for Attention to Mr Bond who left the Letter at a Friend’s House in the City tho’ I made every Enquiry after that Gentleman. I had not the Pleasure of finding...
I should not have thought of troubling you with the inclosed sermon, if it had not been suggested to me by a friend who heard it that it seemed to be formed on the principles which were advanced in your defence of the American Constitutions and to recommend such Checks and Balances in Ecclesiastical as you had thought necessary in civil Government. If in this view of it, or any other it may be...
I am fully in sentiment with you respecting the danger of an established aristocracy and had I fully explained my self when I mentioned the subject in my letter of the 22 Ulto. there would not I suppose have been even a "seeming" difference in opinion thereon. The words slavery and aristocracy have been used here for political purposes as synonymous—They have been equally terrifying to many of...
Knowing your great candor and Rectitude I cannot forbear writing a line least through the important concerns, of your Excellency’s most honrable Station I should not be in your mind, When the Revenue Officer’s are appointed, With all due submission, I beg leave to suggest that it is highly probable, the Collectorship for the District of Portland, may be much easer obtaind, than a less...
I received yesterday your Letter of May the 24 th and shall begin tomorrow to get such things in readiness as will enable us to keep House. I feel a reluctance at striping this wholy at present, because I am well persuaded that we shall in some future period if our lives are prolonged return to it, and even supposing a summer recess, we might wish to come & spend a few months here. an other...
On the advice of my very excellent Friend the Honbl. Mr. Bowdoin I enclose you Copies of my Letters to Major General Knox & his Answer, with a rough draught of a letter to his Excellency the President of the United States; requesting you to peruse them & to give me your opinion, as to the best mode of Conducting my intended Application, & if you approve of the mode & see any Prospect of...
I am directed to inform the Senate that the President has affixed his signature to a bill, entitled “An act to regulate the time and manner of administering certain oaths,” and has returned it to the House of Representatives, from whence it originated. Printed Source--Senate Journal.
Without previous apology or introduction to your Excellency, I haven taken the liberty to request for a few moments your attention to a subject which nearly concerns the future welfare and happiness of myself & family—Whether such a step in any situation can for me be proper I am at a loss to determine, but both my duty and my feelings towards them (especially as I have heard that application...
I find you, & I must agree , not to disagree , or we must cease to discuss political questions. I could as soon believe that the British parliament had once a right to tax America, as believe that the a fourth major part of the citizens of New York were federal , or that many of the federal minority were so, from proper motives. I know from good authority that some of the leading federalists...