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To insure a safe conveyance to the advertisements of the proposed alterations of the conditions of improvements, & to save expense; we have enclosed them to you. to be franked, which we the more readily do, as the alteration is the Act of the President, and not of the board. We are, sir &c. DNA : RG 42--Records of the Commissioners for the District of Columbia, Letters Sent.
The enclosed was left behind by the Captain of Ship, who promised to take it along with the papers & Magazines, which I had the Honor to send you last February. This goes by my Worthy Friend Mr Noble, who says he will have the Honor to deliver it personaly to you; he is a Neighbour of mine, & of a most respectable Character. God forbid that there should be a War between your Country & this; it...
a letter is received from Mr Dumas, begun Dec. 4 & ending Jan. 26. the only interesting passage is the following “I have the satisfaction to be able to testify that the American funds are in great favor with the monied men of this country. I have seen them sell from one to another the obligations of the Congress of the first loan at 100.¾ per cent; those of the last of 1788. at 99 to 100....
I have the honor to enclose you a statement of the expenditure of the monies appropriated to our intercourse with foreign nations to be laid before the legislature according to the requisitions of the law . The account of the Secretary of state commences July 1. 1792. where that rendered at the last session ended; and is brought down to this time. In the two preceding years of this...
Your note of the 5th. instant accompanying the information given to you by G.—— M.—— on the 4th. of March, came safe on friday. The letter he refers to, as having been written to me, is not yet received; but others from Mr. Monroe of similar complexion, and almost of as imperious a tone from that government, have got to hand. That justice & policy should dictate the measures with which we are...
The Barer, Capt: John Whitney, is a Gentleman who Served in the late Continental Army with Good Reputation; is now out of Business, and wishes to be imploy’d in Some Service under your Excellency Control—He is a Gentleman with Whom I have an Acquantence, and is a Person of Good Sence; the utmost Confidence may with Safety be Placed in his Conduct and engagements. I am with the highest...
Your favor from Fredericksburg came safe to hand. I inclose you the extract of a letter I recieved from Mr. R. now in Richmond. Tho you will have been informed of the facts before this reaches you, yet you will see more of the subject by having different views of it presented to you. Though Marshall will be able to embarras the Republican party in the assembly a good deal, yet upon the whole,...
My last letters to you have been of the 13th. and 20th. of Nov. since which I have recieved yours of Sep. 19. We are anxious to hear that the person substituted in the place of the one deceased is gone on that business.—You do not mention your prospect of finding for the mint the officers we were desirous of procuring. On this subject I will add to what was before mentioned to you, that if you...
I have collected and reviewed the Papers relating to Mr. Prioleaus Petition. If you persist in your request, those which came from you will be returned to you; but as I shall certainly report on the case at the next session of Congress, which is the course the business must have—I wish to retain them ’till that is done. The claim appears to be of a nature, that I should reluctantly feel myself...
Since my Letter of April 26th. yours have been received of March 12. 12. 13. 13. and 19. Before the receipt of these, one of which covered the form of your passports , it had been determined here that passports should be issued in our own ports only, as well to secure us against those collusions which would be fraudulent towards our Friends, and would introduce a competition injurious to our...
The letters to Mr. Hammond & Mr. Pinckney appear to me proper, according to the facts stated in them. The object of that to Mr. Genet also appears to me desireable; but I am not wholly without scruple as to the proposition going from the UStates. ALS , Thomas Jefferson Papers, Library of Congress. For background to this letter, see Jefferson to H and Henry Knox, June 25, 1793 . H’s reply was...
Your letter of the 4th of March remains yet to be answered. The question there stated is in substance, whether a Citizen residing out of your state, coming to Boston, and there purchasing a Vessel, must necessarily take and subscribe the oath or affirmation required by law, before the Collector of the District where such Citizen usually resides , in order to obtain a certificate of Registry...
The importation into this District, made by Mr. Cutts of Ports-mouth, was on the 28th Day of May last, in the Ship Lark, Jno. Munro Master from Bordeaux. I do not recollect whether the Invoice specified the difference between Assignats and Specie; but the Duties (secured by Messrs. Clark & Nightingale, owners of the Lark) were calculated on the latter amount, being 1,487 Dollars and 35½ Cents,...
I could not omit so favorable an opportunity, as the departure of Mr Strickland affords me, of presenting my best respects to you; and my sincere thanks for the views of Agriculture in the different counties of Great Britain, which you have had the goodness to send me. and for the Diploma (received by the hands of Mr Jay) admitting me a foreign honorary member of the board of Agriculture. For...
The knowledge of the benevolence of your heart has prompted me to trespass a little on your time; for which I can plead no other excuse than my hope that your Excellencys indulgence will extend to the Gratification of not only my wish but the wish of many who justly entertain a great veneration for your virtues. Could your Excellency be prevail’d on to honor the Theatre with your presence on...
Letter not found. 18 June 1789. Calendared in the lists probably kept by Peter Force (DLC: Madison Miscellany). The two-page letter was offered for sale in the Stan. V. Henkels Catalogue No. 694 (1892), which listed items from the McGuire collection of JM’s papers.
You are appointed by the President of the United States to go to the Court of Morocco for the purpose of obtaining from the new Emperor a recognition of our Treaty with his father. As it is thought best that you should go in some definite character, that of Consul has been adopted, and you consequently receive a Commission as Consul for the United States in the dominions of the Emperor of...
With sincere pleasure I acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 26th Ulto—learning by it that you may be so soon expected with your lady in Phila. to proceed on the Mission to Fr. If this letter should find you in Charleston, it is intended to express A regret that my original letters had not been received by you; and to ask, if there has been any miscarriage of a Mail in the Southern...
AD : Library of Congress On January 29 Chatham left with Franklin the conciliatory plan that he introduced as a bill in the House of Lords three days later, and the American studied and copied it. At the end of his copy is the following memorandum on the rejection of the bill. The above Plan was offered by the Earl of Chatham to the House of Lords, on Wednesday Feb. 1. 1775, under the Title of...
I am extremely obliged to you for your letter of the 8th and received the exposition of your motives as a fresh mark of that confidence with which you have so often favored me. I should indeed, if I know myself, be the last person in the United States, who on a public account would wish you to feel any other; and as it respects your personal fame, I beleive the first to regret their being...
I have duly recieved your [… ] with the extracts of Mr. Short’s letter[s] [. . . .] might be advantageous to transfer his pap[er] […] impossible to ask the opinion of a perso[n] [. . . .] However, after having consulted with thos[e] […] made up an opinion on the subject. Th[…] [advan]tageous to have been an original subscriber to […] the commerce in that stock has now brought […] real value,...
Th: Jefferson is sorry to present a long letter to the President to be read at so busy a moment: but the view which it presents of our commercial matters in France is too interesting to be unknown to the President.—The circumstances presented to view in the 2d. page of the letter induce Th: J. to think it may be well to commit to Mr. Short and the M. de la Fayette to press our settlement with...
The House of Representatives have passed the bill sent from the Senate for concurrence, entitled “An act concerning consuls and vice-consuls,” with amendments, in which amendments they desire the concurrence of the Senate. They have passed the bill, entitled “An act in addition to an act, entitled ’An act for establishing the salaries of the executive officers of government, with their...
I have the honor to inform you, that a letter, of which a copy is enclosed, has come to my hands from the Loan officer of North Carolina, since the date of my last letter. On considering minutely the course of the business of the new Loans and the future operations of the Treasury, as they will affect the public stocks, it appeared necessary to the prevention of frauds by Counterfeiters and...
I recieved your letter of the 21st ulmo a few days ago, but deferred answering it, ‘till I could again see Mr Bayly, & Mr [Daniel] Carroll of Duddington, my informants respecting Coll Mercer’s speech —Inclosed, I send you Mr Bayly’s certificate of what passed—Mr Carroll tho’ he agrees with Mr Bayly, that Coll Mercer expressed himself as stated, has I know not for what reasons declined sending...
Boston, 20 Jan. 1793 . In accordance with the Consular Act, he submits the names of John Coffin Jones and Christopher Gore, Esqrs., Joseph Russell, Jr., merchant, and John Joy, Jr., gentleman, all of Boston, as sureties for his bond, and asks for instructions relating to the care of shipwrecked, sick, or captive mariners, as well as on any other matters TJ may deem fit. The daily allowance...
I have this moment received your letter af the 29th Ulo. relative to the transfer back to your office of the business under the 5th Section of the act of the 8th day of May 1792 making alterations in the Treasury & War Departments. I have verbally apprized Mr. Francis of the part of the letter which relates to him and shall write to him also. I shall likewise apprize the agents throughout the...
The Comptroller of the Treasury has reported to me that “On examining the subsisting contracts between the United States and the Government of France and the Farmers General and a comparison thereof with the foreign accounts and documents transmitted to the Treasury the following facts appear. That, previous to the Treaty of February 1778, the sum of Three millions of livres had been advanced...
Letter not found: from Anthony Whitting, 25 Jan. 1793. GW wrote Whitting on 3 Feb. , acknowledging that “Your letter of the 25th of Jany came duly to hand.”
I sent you last week some of Fenno’s papers in which you will have seen it asserted impudently & boldly that the suggestions against members of Congress were mere falshoods. I now inclose his Wednesday’s paper. I send you also a copy of Hamilton’s notes. Finding that the letter would not be ready to be delivered before the Pr’s return, I made notes corresponding with his, shewing where I...