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Your letter of the 2. instant has reached my hands and in consequence thereof I have applied to Mr Scott for fifty pounds as you desired, who informs me that he did not expect a draught to exceed £15. or £20. and therefore had not made his arrangements for 50. however he says he will pay it if he can make it convenient. As the rents of my lands under your care were to be paid in wheat, and the...
I have upon the great Kanawa and Ohio river, between the two Kanawas several large and valuable tracts of land, which I have been long endeavoring to settle, but without effect. Some three or four years ago I wrote to Colonel Thomas Lewis, who lives in that neighbourhood, requesting his assistance or agency in this business, transmitting to him at the same time instructions expressive of my...
When I returned to your hands the instructions and papers respecting my lands in your neighbourhood, I thought I had sufficiently obviated the reasons which first induced you to decline any agency in that business, by putting it on a footing which might render it perfectly compatible with your own interest and convenience, and I was in a measure confirmed in the opinion that you had accepted...
According to promise, you ought to have received the enclosed at an earlier period; but no inconvenience, I apprehend, will arise from my omitting to do it before now. Our best wishes attend you all and I am—Dear Sir Your Affecte Hble Servt ALS , ViHi . The enclosures were probably documents related to the suit brought by Robert Alexander against the estate of John Parke Custis that Stuart had...
605[Diary entry: 26 June 1790] (Washington Papers)
Saturday 26th. Exercised in the Coach with Mrs. Washington & the Children in the forenoon & by walking in the Afternoon.
606[Diary entry: 27 June 1790] (Washington Papers)
Sunday 27th. Went to Trinity Church in the forenoon and employed myself in writing business in the afternoon.
607[Diary entry: 28 June 1790] (Washington Papers)
Monday 28th. Exercised between 5 & 7 Oclock in the Morning & drank Tea with Mrs. Clinton (the Governors Lady) in the Afternoon. Gov. George Clinton’s residence was at 10 Queen Street, near the end of Cedar Street. The house, for which Clinton paid £300 a year rent, had been confiscated from Loyalist Henry White and was “a two-story and attic house, five windows wide, with a sloping tiled roof,...
608[Diary entry: 29 June 1790] (Washington Papers)
Tuesday 29th. Exercised between 5 & 7 Oclock in the Morning on horse back. A good deal of Company, amongst which several Strangers and some foreigners at the Levee to day. On a consultation with the Secretary of State to day, it was thought advisable to direct him to provide two Medals one for the Marqs. de la Luzerne, formerly Minister Plenipo. from France to the U. States of America, & the...
609[Diary entry: 30 June 1790] (Washington Papers)
Wednesday 30th. Recd. from the Committee of Enrollment the following Acts. viz. “An act providing the means of intercourse between the United States and foreign Nations” By which the President of the United States is authorised to draw from the Treasury 40,000 dollars annually, for the suppt. of such persons as he shall Commission to serve the U. States in foreign pts. and for the expence...
I received a few days ago, the letter which your Lordship did me the honour to write to me on the 27th of March last; accompanied with a view of Dr Anderson’s proposed periodical publication. Dr Anderson’s plan appears judicious, and if the execution shall equal the design in goodness (as from your account of the Author we have reason to expect) there can be no doubt but his Journal will be of...
This late acknowledgement of the receipt of your letter of the 6th of November 1789, and the little box which accompanied it, might require some particular apology had I only my own private concerns to attend to; but when important public duties require my constant attention every allowance must be made for the want of punctuality in those things which regard me individually. I beg, Sir, that...
In replying to your several letters of the 15th of June and 4th of December 1789, and the 10th of January 1790, I must request you to accept my acknowledgements for the very polite terms in which you express your attachment to me—and my best thanks for the several enclosures which accompanied your letters. The unremitting attention which my public duties require, will, I am persuaded,...
An Act of the Legislature of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations for ratifying certain articles as amendments to the Constitution of the United States, was yesterday put into my hands; and I have directed my Secretary to lay a copy of the same before you. LS , DNA : RG 46, First Congress, 1789–91, Records of Legislative Proceedings, President’s Messages; LB , DLC:GW ; copy,...
614[July 1790] (Washington Papers)
Thursday July 1st. Exercised between 5 and 7 Oclock on Horseback. Announced to the House of Representatives (where the Bills originated) that my signature had been given to the Acts above mentioned. Having put into the hands of the Vice President of the U: States the communications of Mr. Gouvr. Morris, who had been empowerd to make informal enquiries how well disposed the British Ministry...
615[Diary entry: 1 July 1790] (Washington Papers)
Thursday July 1st. Exercised between 5 and 7 Oclock on Horseback. Announced to the House of Representatives (where the Bills originated) that my signature had been given to the Acts above mentioned. Having put into the hands of the Vice President of the U: States the communications of Mr. Gouvr. Morris, who had been empowerd to make informal enquiries how well disposed the British Ministry...
I have had the pleasure to receive the two letters which you wrote to me on the 21st of December last from Bilboa, giving information of your safe arrival at that place after a passage rendered peculiarly tedious by the weather & your indisposition. As impressions made by bad weather at sea seldom continue long after we get on shore—and your indisposition was almost removed at the time of your...
I have had the honor to receive your Excellency’s letter of the 24th of August last; and I beg you will be persuaded that I have a grateful heart for the congratulations which you offer upon the organization of our new government, as well as for the warm expressions of personal attachment & good wishes for my happiness which your letter contained. It is with singular pleasure I can inform your...
618[Diary entry: 2 July 1790] (Washington Papers)
Friday 2d. Exercised between 5 & 7 on horse back. About one oclock, official accounts of the safety of Major Doughty (who was sent on important business to the Chiccasaw and Choctaw Nations of Indians) were received; together with the detail of his proceedings to the Country of the former, and the misfortune that attended him in ascending the River Tenessee to the intended place of meeting the...
I nominate Henry Marchant to be Judge, William Channing to be Attorney, and William Peck to be Marshall of the Judicial Court of the United States within the District of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. I likewise nominate the following persons to fill offices in the Revenue Department of the United States, within the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations—viz. Ebenezer...
620[Diary entry: 3 July 1790] (Washington Papers)
Saturday 3d. Exercised between 9 and 11 in the Coach with Mrs. Washington and the Children. The policy of treating Colo. McGillivray, & the Chiefs of the Creek Nation who were coming with him, with attention as they passed through the States to this City induced me to desire the Secretary at War to write to the Governors of Virginia, Maryland & Pensylvania requesting that they might be...
621[Diary entry: 4 July 1790] (Washington Papers)
Sunday 4th. Went to Trinity Church in the forenoon. This day being the Anniversary of the declaration of Independency the celebration of it was put of until to morrow.
Letter not found: to George Augustine Washington, 4 July 1790. On 16 July 1790 George Augustine Washington wrote to GW : “Your favor of the 4th Inst, gave me much satisfaction as it contained information of your health being well restored.”
623[Diary entry: 5 July 1790] (Washington Papers)
Monday 5th. The Members of Senate, House of Representatives, Public Officers, Foreign Characters &ca. The Members of the Cincinnati, Officers of the Militia, &ca., came with the compliments of the day to me. About One Oclk. a sensible Oration was delivered in St. Pauls Chapel by Mr. Brockholst Levingston on the occasion of the day—the tendency of which was, to shew the different situation we...
The congratulatory address of the People of the State of South-Carolina on my election to the office of President of the United States, expressed in such forcible and endearing terms affects me with the liveliest emotions of satisfaction, and induces me to request their acceptance of my sincerest acknowledgements. Flattering as it may be to find the extraordinary unanimity of the People of the...
625[Diary entry: 6 July 1790] (Washington Papers)
Tuesday 6th. Exercised on Horse-back betwn. 5 & 7 Oclock in the Morning. At 9 Oclock I sat for Mr. Trumbull to finish my pictures in some of his historical pieces. Anounced to the House of Representatives (where the Bills originated) my Assent to the Acts which were presented to me on Friday last—One of which Authorises the President to purchase the whole, or such part of that tract of Land...
626[Diary entry: 7 July 1790] (Washington Papers)
Wednesday 7th. Exercised between 5 & 7 this Morning on Horse-back.
This letter will be short—The intention of it being little more than to acknowledge the receipt of your several favors from London, dated the 7 and 13 of April and 1 and 2 of May, on the business which had been entrusted to you of a public nature; and of your other letters of the 12. of April and 3 of May, which more immediately related to my private concerns. Permit me to thank you, my good...
628[Diary entry: 8 July 1790] (Washington Papers)
Thursday 8th. Sat from 9 o’clock till after 10 for Mr. Jno. Trumbull, who was drawing a Portrait of me at full length which he intended to present to Mrs. Washington. About Noon the Secretaries of State, and of the Treasury called upon me—the last of whom reported a communication made to him by Majr. Beckwith Aid de Camp to Lord Dorchester—Governor of Canada wch. he reduced to writing, and is...
I have had the pleasure to receive your letter of the 14th of June and a few days after a duplicate of the same each in closing a copy of the Constitution lately formed for your State. The address of the Convention, which you mentioned in your letter, has been presented by the Gentlemen in Congress from South Carolina; and I have endeavoured to express, in my answer thereto, the grateful sense...
630[Diary entry: 9 July 1790] (Washington Papers)
Friday 9th. Exercised on Horse-back between 5 and 7 in the morning. A letter from Genl. Harmer, enclosing copies of former letters; and Sundry other papers, were put into my hands by the Secretary at War. By these it appears that the frequent hostilities of some Vagabond Indians, who it was supposed had a mind to establish themselves on the Scioto for the purpose of Robbing the Boats, and...
631[Diary entry: 10 July 1790] (Washington Papers)
Saturday 10th. Having formed a Party, consisting of the Vice-President, his lady, Son & Miss Smith; the Secretaries of State, Treasury & War, and the ladies of the two latter; with all the Gentlemen of my family, Mrs. Lear & the two Children we visited the old position of Fort Washington and afterwards dined on a dinner provided by Mr. Mariner at the House lately Colo. Roger Morris but...
632[Diary entry: 11 July 1790] (Washington Papers)
Sunday 11th. At home all day dispatching some business relative to my own private concerns.
633Planting Plans, 11 July 1790 (Washington Papers)
New York, 11 July 1790. Charts a proposed eight-year cycle of crop rotations involving clover, corn, wheat, buckwheat, and rye on fourteen fields of GW’s French’s and Ferry farms. AD , DLC:GW . GW recorded that he spent 11 July, a Sunday, “At home all day dispatching some business relative to my own private concerns” ( Diaries Donald Jackson and Dorothy Twohig, eds. The Diaries of George...
634[Diary entry: 12 July 1790] (Washington Papers)
Monday 12th. Exercised on Horse back between 5 & 6 in the Morning. Sat for Mr. Trumbull from 9 until half after ten. And about Noon had two Bills presented to me by the joint Committee of Congress—The one “An Act for Establishing the Temporary & permanent Seat of the Government of the United States”—The other “An Act further to provide for the payment of the Invalid Pensioners of the United...
635[Diary entry: 13 July 1790] (Washington Papers)
Tuesday 13th. Again sat for Mr. Trumbull from 9 until half past 10 Oclock. A good deal of Company at the Levee to day.
636[Diary entry: 14 July 1790] (Washington Papers)
Wednesday 14th. Exercised on horseback from 5 until near 7 Oclock. Had some further conversation to day with the Chief Justice and Secretary of the Treasury with respect to the business on which Majr. Beckwith was come on. The result—To treat his communications very civilly—to intimate, delicately, that they carried no marks, official or authentic; nor, in speaking of Alliance, did they convey...
Have you formed an opinion on the subject I submitted to you on Tuesday?—Have you heard whether the Bill was disputed in both or either House of Congress on the ground of the Constitution, or whe[ther] this objection (in its full force) was held in petto for the last move, in the present stage of the business?—If it was debated, as above, whether the Arguments adduced by the Author of the...
The President of the United States has, on this day, approved of, and affixed his signature to, the “Act for establishing the temporary and permanent seat of the government of the United States.” Printed Source--Senate Journal.
The first request of this letter is that you would burn it as soon as you have read it and keep the contents to yourself; at least for the present. Some months ago farms lately in the tenure of Mr Abel James were advertised for sale by you and Mr Henry Drinker —These farms I have seen; but not, it is to be acknowledged with the eyes of a Purchaser—The ⟨one⟩ near Frankfort you inform the public...
[New York?] 22 July 1790. GW and George Clinton lease for one year 234 acres on the south side of the Mohawk River in White’s Town, Montgomery County, N.Y., to Jedediah Sanger of that place, for £118.10, as witnessed by Tobias Lear and DeWitt Clinton. DS (partially printed), NUtHi , notarized by DeWitt Clinton before James McHughes, master of chancery, on 30 Jan. 1792, and recorded by Herkimer...
The President of the United States transmits to the Secretary of State, to report thereon, a memorial of Monsr deletombe, Consul of France, to the Legislature of Massachusetts, respecting certain parts of the Consular Convention agreed upon by and between his most Christian Majesty and the President of the United States—together with a Resolution of that Legislature upon said memorial; and a...
The President of the United States transmits to the Secretary of State, to report thereon, a memorial of Monsr. de le tombe, Consul of France, to the Legislature of Massachusetts, respecting certain parts of the Consular Convention agreed upon by and between his most Christian Majesty and the President of the United States, together with a Resolution of that Legislature upon said memorial; and...
I nominate the following persons to fill the Offices affixed to their names. viz. In the Judicial Department. William Peery, of the State of Delaware, to be one of the Judges in the Territory of the United States south of the River Ohio. John Stokes to be Judge of the North Carolina District, in place of William R. Davie who has declined his appointment. In the Revenue Department. Samuel...
In consequence of the general principles agreed to by the Senate in August 1789, the adjustment of the terms of a treaty is far advanced between the United States and the Chiefs of the Creek Indians now in this city, in behalf of themselves and the whole Creek Nation. In preparing the Articles of this Treaty, the present arrangements of the trade with the Creeks have caused much embarrassment....
The President of the United States states the following question for the consideration and advice of the Senate. If it should be found essential to a treaty, for the firm establishment of peace with the Creek Nation of Indians, that an article to the following effect should be inserted therein, will such an article be proper? vizt Secret Article. The commerce necessary for the Creek nation...
Considering the circumstances which prevented the late Commissioners from concluding a Peace with the Creek Nation of Indians, it appeared to me most prudent that all subsequent measures for disposing them to a Treaty should in the first Instance be informal. I informed you on the 4th Inst: that the adjustment of the Terms of a Treaty with their Chiefs now here, was far advanced —such further...
I nominate the following persons to be Commissioners of Loans in the States to which their names are respectively affixed, viz. In the State of New Hampshire Nathaniel Gilman Massachusetts Nathaniel Appleton Rhode Island — Connecticut William Imlay New York John Cochran New Jersey James Ewing Pennsylvania Thomas Smith Delaware James Tilton Maryland Thomas Harwood
I have directed my Secretary to lay before you a Copy of an exemplified Copy of a Law, to ratify, on the part of the State of New Jersey, certain Amendments to the Constitution of the United States; together with the Copy of a letter which accompanied said ratification, from The Honorable Elisha Lawrence Esquire Vice President of the State of New Jersey to the President of the United States....
I nominate Jabez Bowen to be Commissioner of Loans in the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. and Daniel Benezet Junior to be Collector of the Port of Great Egg Harbour in the State of New Jersey. LS , DNA : RG 46, First Congress, 1789–91, Records of Executive Proceedings, President’s Messages—Executive Nominations; LB , DLC:GW . A “c” was written in a different hand after each...
I lay before you a Treaty between the United States and the Chiefs of the Creek-Nation, now in this city, in behalf of themselves and the whole creek-nation, subject to the ratification of the President of the United States, with the advice and consent of the Senate. While I flatter myself that this Treaty will be productive of present peace and prosperity to our southern frontier, it is to be...