You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Washington, George
  • Recipient

    • Jefferson, Thomas
  • Period

    • Washington Presidency

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
Results 1-50 of 331 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Information from our Bankers in Holland that they had money in hand sufft to answer the demands for the Foreign Officers & Captives: and moreover that the residue of the Bonds of the last loan were engaged. The Sum necessary for the first is 60,393 ⅌ —17s.—10d. a year—and 26,000 ⅌ was sent him to complete the business of the Medals. The officers was paid up to the first of the year 1789....
In the selection of characters to fill the important offices of Government in the United States I was naturally led to contemplate the talents and disposition which I knew you to possess and entertain for the Service of your Country. And without being able to consult your inclination, or to derive any knowledge of your intentions from your letters either to myself or to any other of your...
In the selection of Characters to fill the important offices of Government in the United States I was naturally led to contemplate the talents and disposition which I knew you to possess and entertain for the Service of your Country.—And without being able to consult your inclination, or to derive any knowledge of your intentions from your letters either to myself or to any other of your...
You will perceive by the enclosed letter (which was left for you at the Office of Foreign Affairs when I made a journey to the Eastern States) the motives on which I acted with regard to yourself, and the occasion of my explaining them at that early period. Having now reason to hope—from Mr Trumbulls report—that you will be arrived at Norfolk before this time (on which event I would most...
You will perceive by the enclosed letter (which was left for you at the Office of Foreign Affairs when I made a journey to the Eastern States) the motives on which I acted with regard to yourself, and the occasion of my explaining them at that early period. Having now reason to hope from Mr. Trumbulls report that you will be arrived at Norfolk before this time (on which event I would most...
I had the pleasure to receive duly your letter dated the 15th of Decr last; but I thought proper to delay answering or mentioning the contents of it, until after the arrival of Mr Madison, who I understood had been with you. He arrived yesterday, and I now take the earliest opportunity of mentioning to you the result of my reflections; and the expediency of your deciding, at as early a period...
I had the pleasure to receive duly your letter dated the 15th. of Decr. last; but I thought proper to delay answering or mentioning the contents of it, until after the arrival of Mr. Madison, who I understood had been with you.—He arrived yesterday, and I now take the earliest opportunity of mentioning to you the result of my reflections; and the expediency of your deciding, at as early a...
The enclosed Letters & documents from Mr Gouvr Morris are sent for the perusal of the Secretary of State. The private letters from the Marquis de la Fayette and Mr Payne he also gives Mr Jefferson a sight of; because there are some ideas in the latter which are new—and in the former, geneneral information respecting the affairs of France, which, by being compar’d with other accts may (though...
The enclosed Letters and documents from Mr. Gouvr. Morris are sent for the perusal of the Secretary of State. The private letters from the Marquis de la Fayette and Mr. Payne he also gives Mr. Jefferson a sight of; because there are some ideas in the latter which are new, and in the former, general information respecting the Affairs of France, which, by being compar’d with other Accounts may...
Have you formed an opinion on the subject I submitted to you on Tuesday?—Have you heard whether the Bill was disputed in both or either House of Congress on the ground of the Constitution, or whe[ther] this objection (in its full force) was held in petto for the last move, in the present stage of the business?—If it was debated, as above, whether the Arguments adduced by the Author of the...
The President of the United States transmits to the Secretary of State, to report thereon, a memorial of Monsr deletombe, Consul of France, to the Legislature of Massachusetts, respecting certain parts of the Consular Convention agreed upon by and between his most Christian Majesty and the President of the United States—together with a Resolution of that Legislature upon said memorial; and a...
The President of the United States transmits to the Secretary of State, to report thereon, a memorial of Monsr. de le tombe, Consul of France, to the Legislature of Massachusetts, respecting certain parts of the Consular Convention agreed upon by and between his most Christian Majesty and the President of the United States, together with a Resolution of that Legislature upon said memorial; and...
Enclosed is the report (I mentioned to you on our Passage to Rhode-Island) of the Officer who was directed to explore the Navigation of Big Beaver &ca —When you have read, & taken such extracts from it as you may be inclined to do, please to return to the papers to me, as they will have a place with some other Papers I mean to take with me to Virginia. The short and rough Extracts also...
Enclosed is the report (I mentioned to you on our Passage to Rhode-Island) of the Officer who was directed to explore the Navigation of Big Beaver &c.—When you have read, and taken such extracts from it as you may be inclined to do, please to return the papers to me, as they will have a place with some other Papers I mean to take with me to Virginia. The short and rough Extracts also enclosed,...
The P. requests that Mr J. would give the letter & statement herewith sent from the S. of War a perusal, & return it to him in the course of the day with his opinion as to the propriety of the manner of ⟨making⟩ the communication to Congress; and whether it ought not, at any rate, to be introduced in some such way, as this (if it is to pass thro him to Congress) “Pursuant to direction” “I...
The P———requests that Mr. J———would give the letter and statement herewith sent from the S. of War a perusal, and return it to him in the course of the day with his opinion as to the propriety of the manner of making the communication to Congress; and whether it ought not, at any rate, to be introduced in some such way as this (if it is to pass thro him to Congress) “Pursuant to directions I...
Herewith you will receive the Powers & Instructions with which Gouvr Morris Esqr. is invested and his communications consequent thereof. You will give them the consideration their importance merit, and refer your opinion of the measures proper to be taken thereupon. The following extract from one of my private letters to Mr Morris contains all the notice I have yet taken of his public...
Herewith you will receive the Powers and Instructions with which Gouvr. Morris Esqr. is invested and his Communications consequent thereof.—You will give them the consideration their importance merit, and report your opinion of the measures proper to be taken thereupon. The following extract from one of my private letters to Mr. Morris contains all the notice I have yet taken of his public...
The enclosed Notes are sufficiently descriptive to comprehend the two objects fully; but it is necessary to remark, that if the first line begins at a point on Hunting Creek, the fourth line cannot, in any part touch (Though it will include) the Town of Alexandria; because Huntg Creek is below the boundaries of the Town. And, if it could be so ordered as for the first line to avoid touching...
The enclosed Notes are sufficiently descriptive to comprehend the two objects fully; but it is necessary to remark, that if the first line begins at a point on Hunting Creek, the fourth line cannot, in any part, touch (Though it will include ) the Town of Alexandria; because Huntg. Creek is below the boundaries of the Town.—And, if it could be so ordered as for the first line to avoid touching...
The P. begs to see Mr Jefferson before he proceeds further in the Proclamation. From a more attentive examination of some Papers, in his possession, he finds that it is in his power to ascertain the course & distance from the Court House in Alexandria to the upper & lower end of the Canal at the little Falls with as much accuracy as can be known from Common Surveying if not to mathematical...
The P. begs to see Mr. Jefferson before he proceeds further in the Proclamation.—From a more attentive examination of some Papers, in his possession, he finds that it is in his power to ascertain the course and distance from the Court House in Alexandria to the upper and lower end of the Canal at the little Falls with as much accuracy as can be known from Common Surveying if not to...
Nothing in the enclosed letter superceding the necessity of Mr Ellicots proceeding to the work in hand—I would thank you, for requesting him, to set out on thursday; or as soon after as he can make it convenient: also for preparing such instructions as you may conceive it necessary for me to give him for ascertaining the points we wish to know; first, for the general view of things—& next for...
Nothing in the enclosed letter superceding the necessity of Mr. Ellicot, proceeding to the work in hand, I would thank you, for requesting him, to set out on thursday; or as soon after as he can make it convenient; also for preparing such instructions as you may conceive it necessary for me to give him for ascertaining the points we wish to know; first , for the general view of things, and...
The messages to the two Houses, as altered are quite agreeable to. Whether, as it is equally known to both houses, that we have no person in a public character at the Ct of London it is best that the word “informal” should remain in the message to the Ho. of Representatives, or not, Mr J. may decide by the fair copy he shall send to ALS , DLC : Jefferson Papers. For the background to this...
The messages to the two Houses, as altered, are quite agreeable to Whether, as it is equally known to both houses, that we have no person in a public character at the Court of London it is best that the word “informal” should remain in the message to the Ho: of Representatives, or not, Mr. J. may decide by the fair copy he shall send to RC ( DLC ); addressed by Washington: “Mr. Jefferson Secy...
The P. would thank Mr Jefferson for placing all, or such of the enclosed Papers (after he has perused them) in the hands of the Attorney General, as he shall deem necessary for the purpose of drawing the several conveyances of the ceded Lands, or, the form of one. For the former, it is conceived farther information than the enclosures contain, is wanting. For the latter, the agreement, and...
The P. would thank Mr. Jefferson for placing all, or such of the enclosed Papers (after he has perused them) in the hands of the Attorney General as he shall deem necessary for the purpose of drawing the several conveyances of the ceded Lands, or the form of one. For the former, it is conceived farther information than the enclosures contain, is wanting.—For the latter, the agreement, and...
The P. has given the enclosed letters an attentive reading & consideration, and has found nothing in them but what is just, and in the hands of a prudent user proper; but at the end of the words of the letter to Mr C. “this wrong” 2d page 10th line may it not be well to add—“yet with that prudence & circumspection which will not commit the Government to the necessity of proceeding to...
Letter not found: to Thomas Jefferson, 10 Mar. 1791. In his Summary Journal of Public Letters ( DLC : Jefferson Papers) of 10 Mar. 1791, Jefferson recorded that GW returned Jefferson’s draft instructions to Thomas Barclay regarding his mission to Morocco and Jefferson’s draft letter to the new emperor of Morocco with a covering note, which has not been found.
The P. has given the enclosed letters an attentive reading and consideration, and has found nothing in them but what is just , and in the hands of a prudent user proper ; but at the end of the words of the letter to Mr. C “this wrong” 2d. page 10th. line may it not be well to add—“yet with that prudence and circumspection which will not commit the Government to the necessity of proceeding to...
Enclosed is the last letter I have received from Messrs Deakins & Stoddart. What step had I best take to bring matters to a close with Burn’s, and by declaring at once the Site of the public buildings, prevent some inconvenience which I see may arise from the opinions promulgated by Mr L’Enfont? as much probably from complaisance as judgment. Yrs ALS , DLC : Thomas Jefferson Papers. The...
Enclosed is the last letter I have received from Messrs. Deakins and Stoddart.—What step had I best take to bring matters to a close with Burn’s, and by declaring at once the site of the public buildings, prevent some inconvenience which I see may arise from the opinions promulgated by Mr. L’Enfont? as much probably from complaisance as judgment.—Yrs, RC ( DLC ); addressed: “Mr. Jefferson”:...
The P. has just recd the enclosed. He prays Mr Jefferson to write by tomorrows Post to Majr L’Enfant agreeably to what was mentioned this morning. AL , DLC : Thomas Jefferson Papers. For the background to this letter, see GW to Jefferson, 16 Mar. 1791 . The enclosure has not been found. GW and Jefferson conferred about the Federal City on the morning of 17 Mar. 1791, discussing the appropriate...
The P. has just received the enclosed.—He prays Mr. Jefferson to write by tomorrows Post to Majr. L’Enfont agreeably to what was mentioned this morning. RC ( DLC ); addressed: “Mr. Jefferson”; endorsed by TJ as received 17 Mch. 1791. Entry in SJPL reads: “[1791. Mar.] 17. G. W. to Th: J. concerning Lenfant.” Enclosure not identified.
The President concurs with the Secretary of State in opinion that, circumstances make it advisable to commit Mr. Short and the Marqs. de la Fayette to press in a discreet manner our Settlement with the Court of Spain on a broader bottom than merely that of the case of Ste. Marie, and authorises him to take measures accordingly. RC ( DLC ); addressed: “The Secretary of State”; endorsed by TJ as...
Having been so fortunate as to reconcile the contending interests of Georgetown and Carrollsburg, and to unite them in such an agreement as permits the public purposes to be carried into effect on an extensive and proper scale, I have the pleasure to transmit to you the enclosed proclamation, which after annexing your counter signature and the seal of the United States, you will cause to be...
Having been so fortunate as to reconcile the contending interests of Georgetown and Carrollsburg, and to unite them in such an agreement as permits the public purposes to be carried into effect on an extensive and proper scale, I have the pleasure to transmit to you the enclosed proclamation, which, after annexing your counter signature and the seal of the United States, you will cause to be...
I have had the pleasure to receive your letter of the 27th ult. with the papers which accompanied it. Referring to your Judgment whether a commission, similar to that intended for Mr Barclay, may be given without the agency of the Senate, I return both papers to you signed, in order that the one you deem most proper may be used. Your opinions respecting the acts of force which have already...
I have had the pleasure to receive your letter of the 27th. ult. with the papers which accompanied it. Referring to your judgment whether a commission, similar to that intended for Mr. Barclay, may be given without the agency of the Senate, I return both papers to you signed, in order that the one you deem most proper may be used. Your opinions respecting the acts of force which have already...
As the public service may require that communications should be made to me, during my absence from the seat of government, by the most direct conveyances and as, in the event of any very extraordinary occurrence, it will be necessary to know at what time I may be found in any particular place, I have to inform you that unless the progress of my journey to Savannah is retarded by unforeseen...
As the public service may require that communications should be made to me, during my absence from the seat of government, by the most direct conveyances—and as, in the event of any very extraordinary occurrence, it will be necessary to know at what time I may be found in any particular place, I have to inform you that unless the progress of my journey to Savannah is retarded by unforeseen...
You will readily agree with me that the best interests of the United States require such an intimation to be made to the Governor of Canada, either directly or indirectly, as may produce instructions to prevent the Indians receiving military aid or supplies from the british posts or garrisons—The notoriety of this assistance has already been such as renders enquiry into particulars...
As the public service may require that communications should be made to me, during my absence from the seat of government, by the most direct conveyances, and as, in the event of any very extraordinary occurrence, it will be necessary to know at what time I may be found in any particular place, I have to inform you that unless the progress of my journey to Savannah is retarded by unforeseen...
You will readily agree with me that the best interests of the United States require such an intimation to be made to the Governor of Canada, either directly or indirectly, as may produce instructions to prevent the Indians receiving military aid or supplies from the british posts or garrisons.—The notoriety of this assistance has already been such as renders enquiry into particulars...
Your letter of the 2d came to my hands at this place. Part of it did as you supposed, & might well suppose, astonished me exceedingly. I think it not only right that Mr Carmichael should be furnished with a copy of the genuine letters to Mr G. Morris, but that Mr [Morris] should also know the result of his conferences with the Duke of Leeds at the Court of Madrid. The contents of my official...
Your letter of the 2d. came to my hands at this place.—Part of it did as you supposed, and might well suppose, astonished me exceedingly. I think it not only right that Mr. Carmichael should be furnished with a copy of the genuine letters to Mr. G. Morris, but that Mr. Morris should also know the result of his conferences with the Duke of Leeds at the Court of Madrid.—The contents of my...
The round of business and of ceremony, which now engages my attention, only allows me leisure to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 10th of last month, which will receive a more particular consideration. I am, with great esteem Sir, Your most obedient Servant LS , DLC : Thomas Jefferson Papers. Jefferson sent his letter to GW at Wilmington, N.C., which the president reached on 24...
The round of business and of ceremony, which now engages my attention, only allows me leisure to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 10th. of last month, which will receive a more particular consideration.—I am, with great esteem, Sir, Your most obedient Servant, RC ( DLC ); in hand of William Jackson except for signature; endorsed by TJ as received at Albany 25 May 1791 and so...
I acknowledged the receipt of your letter of the 2nd of April from Richmond—since which I have only received two letters from you of the 10th of April and 15th of May. Concluding that some of your dispatches may have been forwarded to Taylor’s ferry (by which route I did not return) I have to request, if that should have been the case, and the communications were of a particular or pressing...