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Abstract. 15 October 1792. John Taliaferro Brooke, having purchased lot 127 in Fredericksburg, Virginia, from James Monroe and Eliza his wife, conveys that lot to Robert Mercer for £435. Witnessed by JM, John Minor, Jr., and Joseph Jones. Recorded 8 Nov. 1792. Printed extract (Crozier, Virginia County Records: Spotsylvania County , p. 456).
I have yours inclosing a paper of the 20th. inst. which rather weakens than strengthens the report of the good fortune of the French in vanquishing and capturing the D. York & his army, and of the retaking Toulon—events if they shall be verified that cannot fail to make a deep impression on the British nation and increase the number of opponents to the prosecution of the War. The vote agt....
The day after my return I wrote you a few lines to let you know I was at home I shall in a few days be obliged to set out on the eastern circuit and shall not return untill between the 20th. and last of may. I shall reach Williamsburg the 28th. of April if not a day or two before where I shall remain abt. twelve days I shall be glad to hear from you at that place any material occurrence that...
Being longer detained in Albemarle than I expected I did not arrive here untill the last evening, when I received your letters of the 2d. & 5th. and of the 13th. I will attend to what you recommend respecting the republication of observations under the signature Citizen two Nos. have only appeared that have come to my knowledge and these in papers of the first week of the month. The lapse of...
I have been absent a fortnight on a visit to Albemarle—while there I went over all the papers and could find nothing among them answering the expectation of Mr. Knox and yet I think Monroe had some communications from the old Gent. himself or one of his Daughters to the purport of what Mr. Knox supposes he possessed. There were many papers and some statemts of Monroes respecting this business...
It is with real pleasure I learn there is a probability of a favourable issue to the consultations in Boston on the commercial propositions. If, before Mr. Pinkneys communications are promulgated, the People of that City in general felt a degree of resentment to the unjust and unprecedented conduct of the British nation towards us, the knowledge that we have nothing to hope or expect from them...
As soon as I returned from Loudoun I wrote you a letter which I supposed wod. be in time for you to answer about the time I shod. leave Fredericksburg for this place, that is that I might receive the answer by that time—yours of the 3d. inst. I have this moment recd. and can only inform you that I had requested information respecting the Rock Castle land as well as other things—and informed a...
I have been delayed in seting out for Loudoun longer than I expected. I move on Tomorow but not the rout I intended as the person I wished to see has left home and not yet returned—the cause of his departure is matter of conjecture. Mr Patton lately from Philaa. and Picket of Richmond say it is generally beleived that the Pres: approves of what has been done by the Senate respecting the Treaty...
Since my last to you I have recd. a letter from Monroe dated the 4th & 6th Septr. It came by the last post and cost me 5/9—from whence or how it came I cannot discover by the marks on the letter. He informs me they were all well, and that he expected to write to Yourself and Mr. Jefferson by the same opportunity—that he had before written to the Secretary of State. The news it contains we have...
I have recd. your letter of the 21st. last month and thank you for the communications it contains. Unquestionably the Secretary of State would have been a preferable arrangemt. to the one provided for by the act in case of a vacancy in the Executive office—whatever may be said in favor of the pro. tem. president of the Senate or Speaker of the H. R. as Officers (and it will be difficult to...
We have heard much of the di[s]agreement between the two Houses respecting titles and the rules to be established for their correspondence—if report speaks truth they have manifested a strong desire for titles and pre-eminence—how comes it that the doors where the Senate sit in their legislative capacity are shut and those of the representatives open—it appears to be equally proper and...
I understand Capt. Wm Lewis has undertaken the management of the Light-house on our Cape, whereby the Surveyors place is vacant and of course a new appointment necessary to supply the vacancy. Mr Moffat formerly a merchant of this Town who intermarried with Dr Chs Mortimer’s daughter, and has been resident here ever since, is I am told desirous of being appointed to the office, and is I think...
I last week informed you I had packed up the china and sent it on board a vessell commanded by Capt. Lambert (his name is Lambeth) who expected to sail the next day. He goes to the house of Lloyd and Sparks of Philadelphia. A spell of rainy weather that commenced while he was loading has detained him untill to day, so that you may expect him soon after the receipt of this letter. I inclose the...
I have a letter from Mr. Randolph authorising me to draw on him for £200 on Monroes account which I presume is all he can admit of but is short of the sum I had proposed and he from your communication intended to advance—whatever sum Monroe has requested him to furnish me, I wish him to supply, if he thinks he can with propriety do it, otherwise not by any means. I do not wish any direct...
Mr. Jefferson left this yesterday morning before the arrival of the Stage so that your letter to him by the mail is returned—he meant to take one of the Stages at Alexa. leaving his horses there untill his return. Dr Shipen who came in the stage met him about 3 miles above Falmouth. After the receipt of your letter finding the examination continued I went up Town and missed of Green who was...
Mr. Green and Mullin will republish the Citizen and I observe the 1st. Number in Greens last paper. I have to number four and wish you to have the following numbers inserted in Baches’s paper as from them I can have them republished withot. your inclosing them and being subjected to postage. I understand you will be voted for to represent the County of Orange and will be elected unless you...
I lately returned from my trip to Loudoun and Albemarle—what was doing in the Assembly I mentd. in my letter to you before I set out and you have seen the subsequent proceedings in the papers which is all I have seen or heard myself respecting the business I left them engaged in. In my way to Albemarle I called at Col. Madisons but he and his Lady were on a visit to Mr. Hites. The commencemt....
No safe opportunity offering, the letter for Mr. Nelson has not been forwarded, and I shall now reserve it for him untill the chancery term commences which will be in a day or two —those from Mr. Jefferson have been attended to, the one to Dr. Currie I have delivered, that for Mr. Lewis met a ready conveyance by Mr. Bob Nelson who was here, when it came to hand, on his way to Charlottesville,...
After a conflict in my breast for two weeks past, whch I should transgress a rule from which I have in no instance departed, al[t]ho’ honoured with several respectable appointments by my Country, I have determined to inform you of my wish to come into the office of district Judge—the emoluments of the appointment with the profitts I could make from my fortune though small would enable me to...
The receipt of your letter of the 29th. ult. gave me a sensible pleasure as it recommences a correspondence too long intermitted between friends in which predicament I am very certain we very sincerely hold each other and between whom a more frequent intercourse should if practicable prevail than has lately done—for it I chiefly blame myself, and you only for availing yourself in too great a...
On my return a few days past I wrote you a letter and requested you wod. take the trouble to obtain from Mr. Beache and transmit me his acct. that I might inclose the amount to you or him in bank paper. I wish also to know whether he or myself according to his terms are liable for the postage. I was apprehensive from the vote of the House changing their Speaker the majority of that Body wod....
In expectation this will find you in Philaa: where the best information can be obtained respecting the returns of Electors for the several States, and from whence a well grounded conclusion may be formed—I wish to hear what hopes you have of the ultimate decision. From the last acct. we have of the Pensylvania elections (Fayette Green and Westmoreland returns not in) I think the Republican...
We have nothing in this quarter worth mentioning or I should more frequently make communications. I conclude you receive our papers regularly or would inclose them weekly. Although the proceedings of the House of representatives on the impost bill produced some remarks and altercation respecting its equality and policy yet I think the disputes appr. to have somewhat more of warmth respecting...
I am to thank you for your several favors since the commencement of the session of Congress and also for a present of potatoes delivered by Col. Madisons Waggoner by your desire as he informed me—they are excellent for the year and appear to be of superior quality from the common red potatoe. As yet I do not discover that any thing has taken place in your house to shew or determine the...
It has turned out much as I expected—there are few men who possess sufficient public spirit to relinquish or hazard individual int. for general good. British credit still maintains its influence and will continue to do so especially when aided by the monied int of this country, wch. will generally be in concert to prevent any measure that may eventually affect either. I fear the longer we...
I thank you for the papers and your late favor explaining the business of Monroe with Mr. Randolph. Be pleased to attend to transmitting the inclosed. Mr. Brent is not I presume the Author of the Pamphlet you sent, from him it was expected something would appear in answer to Lees address to the people of the district which savored not a little of selfimportance and exaltation of himself above...
After my return from Loudoun I came to this place, where I last post received your several favors to the 13th. I shall continue here untill the 10th. or 12th. next month when I shall return to Fredericksburg. It seems to be now well ascertaine⟨d⟩ that A. will be the p. & J. the Vice p. I have for a length of time considered Mr. A. as a friend to the British Nation and Government whr. he still...
I expected to have been with you before now but have been unwell a few days past wch. has delayed me. Anty. goes up with a few things to Monroes wch. I suppose will be wanting there while I am up. He brings all the Coffee that came here in the Matt package—package and Coffee weighed 38 lb whe. it was the whole that should have come I am uninformd. I have sent you a pine apple cheese which I...
I have your favors of the 12th. and 14th. of the month with the Papers inclosed. It is somewhat strange we have no letters public or private from Monroe when so many opportunities have offered since his arrival and in particular the Corvette arrived at Baltimore with despatches for the Minister of France. The Republic appears to pursue her victories in all quarters and to bid fair to vanquish...
I thank you for your letters with the papers inclosed. It appears from the accounts I have seen that Mr. A. will be reelected and I think and have heretofore expressed that opinion to Monroe that the investigation of his opinions and their tendency was not commenced in time to make the impression on the Public mind that was necessary to effect a change—nor do I think his conduct in office (if...
I returned last evening from Loudoun where I had been two weeks geting the land surveyed and fixing some hands on a small part of it or your favors of the 2d. & 4th. should have been sooner noticed. My absence prevented my attending to your letter to J. Willis but no inconvenience has resulted from it. The story you mention had been circulated and some had asked me if I thought it true or had...
We have long expected you and was apprehensive something disastrous had happened to prevent your coming up. I am sorry for poor Antoine’s situation wch. certainly demands your attention and is a satisfactory apology for your declining to leave home untill he is apparently free from danger. I delivered the pamphlets to Mr. Jefferson who was a few days past very well and to whom I shall...
I have avoided opening my usual correspondence with you from a conviction in my own mind that any communications I could make would be uninteresting to you and occasion a waste of your time that might be otherwise more usefully employed in prosecuting your labours in the public service, more especially as I take it for granted Mr. Fenno gives us a pretty authentic detail of the proceedings in...
I came up in the stage from Richmond on Thursday having the evening before traveled to the oaks to avoid geting up in the night. I left the house at two on wednesday when they were debating a proposition calculated to approve the conduct of their Senators in opposing the Treaty. The motion was made on Tuesday by Mr. Page and supported by Egglestone. Marshall objected in a long speech tending...
Mr. Christopher Roane, who is a searcher at City Point, requests to be introduced to you. He would wish to continue in office . He is a man of great integrity, and has conducted himself well as a Searcher. He was an officer during the late war. Your assistance, in continuing him in office, will, I think, be of service to him, & of advantage to our country, if appointed; he appears to me, to be...
By the last mail from this place I acknowledged the rect. of your favors to the 16th. last month among them the first part of T. P’s letter to the president which had been somewhere delayed as I recd. the other part sometime before. This weeks mail altho’ it arrived on Friday evening (the usual time) has yet furnished neither letters or papers as the Young man who keeps the P. Office went from...
My excursions during the sickly season deprived me of the pleasure of continuing our correspondence which should have been sooner resumed on my part after my return had I not expected on the adjournment of congress you wod. have left N. York—but hearing you were not returned to Virginia I take occasion by Mr. Griffin to drop you a few lines. The Assembly are as usual moving slowly in the...
I was not only astonished but concerned to see in what manner the resolutions of the Virginia Ass: was treated by the Mass. Legislature as well as some others but by others with more decency —these are strange and unaccountable things to me but I suppose are well warranted in the opinion of others better informed. I had supposed there was nothing unconstitutional in a state legislature...
Having a few days to spare between the courts of K. & Q. and Williamsburg I have (by way of a short cut) taken Fredg. in the way—on my arrival here I recd. your letters of the 28. & 30th. March with the papers inclosed. I was satisfied the p. meant not to comply with the request of the House by his answer to the Com:tee. I had supposed untill then he wod. not refuse the papers. Altho’ when he...
Mr. Brent has lately published a small Pamphlet in answer to Mr. Lees address to the people of the District. This as well as the one you sent me are ample expositions of Lees conduct in Congress and will prove satisfactory to those who will be at the trouble to read and are capable of judging of them—the bulk of the people are not so and will not examine them. Had Mr. Brent in his letter to...
On my arrival here on the 28th. I recd. your favors of the 18th. & 22d. and last evening that of the 25th. ult. and thank you very kindly for the communications they contain. I wish you may take the question on the app: for the British treaty as soon as you expect, as I am apprehensive the delay will prove dangerous, and greatly diminish the respectable number of the former majority if not...
… We are here much at a loss to account for Hamilton’s letter giving notice of his intention to resign…. It will make an opening which, if filled by a proper person, of staunch republican principles, will prove an important acquisition…. Is there any reason to expect Mr. Jay’s mission will produce compensation for the plundered merchants and the execution of the treaty of peace? … Printed...
I have received your letters with the papers inclosed and have delivered to Mr. Blair those intended for your brother to be forwarded by the first conveyance. The good fortune of the Frenchmen seems to be joyfully entertained by the Republicans in Boston and the public display of their joy will I hope produce a good effect on the minds of many of the people in that quarter and revive their...
I have your favor from Philadelphia and very sincerely rejoice with you on your late change of condition and safe arrival in the City. Present my congratulations to your Lady. The tea china you mention is here and shall be packed up carefully and sent by Capt. Lambert who informs me he shall leave this place Tomorow evening or next day for Philadelphia. Monroe must certainly be safe in France...
I thank you for the copy of the amendments proposed to the constitution which you lately inclosed to me —they are calculated to secure the personal rights of the people so far as declarations on paper can effect the purpose, leaving unimpaired the great Powers of the government—they are of such a nature as to be generally acceptable and of course more likely to obtain the assent of Congress...
I conclude Mr. Jefferson has gone forward the upper road as he has not yet passed through this Town which ere now he wod. have done unless something prevented his seting out as early as he intended. By the last Mail I recd. A letter from Monroe. He recd. between the 27th. Octr. and the 3d. Nov. his letter of recall dated 22d. Augt. last and says he shall not take his departure till april. He...
I have your favor of the 13th. and thank you for the communications it contains. However necessary the present armament may be for a vigorous prosecution of the war agt. the Indians it will I think be difficult to shew a good pretence for continuing the present number of regulars beyond the period of accommodation. So long as the British remain in possession of the Posts, or perhaps were they...
After my return from the General Court where I shall go next Monday I shall take the circuit from Dumfries Alexandria & through Loudoun onwards to Charlotte [s]ville by which means I shall effectuelly I think dissipate the effluvia which may have attached to me from those in the smallpox —indeed I do not think anything I shall take with me can endanger any one as I have none of it in the house...
On my return from Loudoun the evening before last I received yours of the 14th. Nothing final has I presume been yet effected by Mr. Jay or it wod. be laid before the legislature and if any thing beneficial to this country is ultimately obtained from G. Britain we may ascribe it altogether to her distressed situation in consequence of the successes of the French republic. Altho’ it is...
I have your favor of the 25th. ult. and in consequence of the information given respecting Monroes land on Rock castle I inclose the Survey and a memdum. of his respecting it. The patent may be taken out for any thing I know as Mr. Fowler (who owed Monroe money) was to do it and contrive it to you, but it is probable that Monroe being absent Fowler may have neglected to perform his promise in...