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I do myself the honor to enclose you a letter received from Mr Fitzsimons by the days mail. The house to which he alludes is situated about a mile from the State house on or near the continuation of Second & Front Streets. It is about a quarter of a mile from the Delaware, South of the city and due West of the old battery, which was falling to decay when you were last in Philadelphia. The lot...
Mr T. Coxe has the honor respectfully to enclose to the V. President of the United States a return of the licensed fishing vessels for one year, in which are included above 5000 Tons, which were not reported from the Custom houses, when the Registers abstract was furnished— MHi : Adams Papers.
I have the honor avail myself of the opportunity preceeded by the honorable R. Morris Esquire of transmitting you a Draught at Sight on the collector of Boston for 500 Drs agreably to the your instructions. I had to you.— The remainder will be paid , as you will pleased to direct, on applications of your Steward. No occurrence worthy of being communicated to you has taken place since you left...
I have the honor to inform you that on a second application of your Steward, I this day paid a second Sum of one hundred Dollars— A letter from the Supervisor of Virginia to a gentleman in this City mentions that the plan of the Bank does not appear to create any uneasiness there, and that he considers the excise or revenue law as likely to be popular on the South side of James River, where it...
I have had the honor to inform you of the payment of several sums of money to your Steward. You will find enclosed an acknowledgment from him, that he has received from me the whole five hundred dollars, which you were pleased to leave in my hands. I shall be much obliged, Sir, by your covering to me the receipt I gave you for this money. I had great pleasure in meeting my friend Colonel Smith...
I have the honor to enclose you a continued bill of the Treasurer’s set of exchange, No. 1351, for five hundred dollars in your favour bearing date the 4th day of May 1791 and drawn on Benjamin Lincoln Eq. Collector of Boston. I beg leave respectfully to observe, that the Secretary of the Treasury relies upon your readiness to indemnify the United States for any injury that might arise to them...
I am honored this day with your letter enclosing one for Mr. W. Hamilton, and one for your Steward, both of which I have put into the way of being delivered to them. It will give me very great & sincere pleasure to be instrumental to the accommodation of Mrs. Adams & yourself, for which purpose I shall take all the pains in my power to procure a house, that will be suitable. Rents are much...
I have the honor to inform you that I have after many efforts procured you a house at the corner of 4th & Arch streets now in the Tenure of Judge Bradford late Attorney Genl. of Pennsa. The rent is very extravagant and we have to procure a stable and coach house in the neighbourhood unless you chuse for the six months of the Session to have your horses at livery. General Knox agreed with me...
I have to acknowledge the honor of your letter of the 13th. instant—and am very happy to find that what has been done in regard to a house is satisfactory to Mrs. Adams and yourself. It gives me great pleasure to inform you that I have a message this moment from Mrs. Keppele (the owner) from which I learn that Mr. Bradford will certainly move out on the 4th of October; so that I hope to have...
I hope this letter will find you and Mrs. Adams comfortably set down at Braintree, where your mind will have time to recover from the fatigues of a very discordant Session—There has been done however a good deal of important & useful business, which will conduce towards the great Desideratum of public order. The provision for the Election of the President & Vice President & for the contingent...
I have the honor of your letter from the Town of Quincy, of the erection of which I was not before informed: nor did I ever hear you distinguished by the title of “ Braintree ” unless the tree of knowledge may be so called. Mr Pinckney is still here. I do not know precisely when he will depart. No ship, which he likes, is to be found in Phila. or N. York destined for England. The Sidney, of...
I had the honor to receive your letter relative to the house, and have since confer’d with Mrs. Koppell on the Subject. She does not incline to take the lease off your hands, but is willing to let the house, if a satisfactory tenant shall offer, for a year after your time. If this can be effected the rent in the interum may be saved. I have therefore advised your Son by a note yesterday to put...
I am sorry to inform you that since I had the honor to write you last no offer, within my Knowlege, has been made for Mrs. Keppele’s house, tho a bill was set up on it at an early day. I presume your Son has duly communicated this to you before. You will see by our public prints that Pennsylvania has commenced openly its electioneering movements. Two meetings have been held in the Hall,...
I have the honor to inclose you the concluding Number of the Reflexions on the State of the Union: also a gazette of this Evening with some late accounts from France. The Situation of that Nation and of Poland have become extremely critical, and as there was a long season of operation before the allied crowns and before the Russians, it appears highly probable, that the ensuing Campaign will...
I have the honor to enclose you with the most sincere pleasure the proceedings of our Lancaster Conference. The Ticket contains more firm friends to a complete execution of the powers of the General Government than any we have yet had, tho it comprehends a representation of the Citizens of an opposite sentiment. There are few or no malignant Characters among them. It has a great share of my...
As I learn from your son, who was good enough to call on me on Friday Evening, that you do not expect to leave Massachusetts, ‘till the middle of November I do myself the Honor of writing to you on present appearances here. The exertions of the enemies of the government in Pennsa. and the weight of a public character & his friends which, in my opinion, has been industriously thrown into that...
I have the honor to inclose you a list of the Votes in the city and county of Philadelphia from which it appears that the antifederal people are not as much animated upon this occasion as their leaders, and that we have more than our real proportion of votes in the city, and much more in the County. The Boroughs are generally enlightened and federal, and vote largely in proportion in all...
Tho I suppose that some recent arrivals in the ports at S.E. of Philadelphia will give you the conformation of the report of war between G Britain & France I do myself the honor to mention to you the foundation on which it rests here. A Philada. ship arrived yesterday from Lisbon, when the Captn. Saw in the hands of Mr John Balkely, our principal American house, a letter from Mr. Fenwick the...
I had lately the honor to write you a letter on a point, which continues to be interesting. We are now certainly to expect the Arrival of the new french Minister in a very short time, and it is a matter of consequence to our peace , that we should get through the business which he may bring up in consequence of the present State of things in Europe without differences. It would oblige me very...
I have this moment the honor of your letter of the 25th. Ultimo the Subject of which shall be treated as you direct . It is however very satisfactory to me to know your sentiments. My Judgment is that we may honorably avoid the evil of engaging. My hopes are that we shall. Yet I am not without fears of the reverse, from feelings, accident & ingenuity all of which offord chances against us—No...
I had the honor to write to you very hastily by the post following the receipt of your letter. I was entirely unacquainted with the degree in which the present state of things might have been formerly brought before you, but having heard the point mentioned (on which I took the liberty to ask your recollection) it appeared to be of so much consequence, that I was very anxious to know whether...
As the time fixed by the constitution for the meeting of Congress is approaching, I presume it will be interesting to you to know the Situation of things here. I therefore do myself the honor to write to you— I have the authority of three Physicians of the city for assuring you that for several days prior to last Night (the date of my information) no person has died in Philada. of the Yellow...
Although my information concerning the state of the Disease, as I had the honor to communicate it in my last, was founded on answers to Enquiries made of three Physicians, it appears that a few persons, who remained in the Disease, have died since. We have had several days of rain, which is followed this morning by a bright cool day—The most favorable to the city. My house not being perfectly...
Since I had the honor to address you last my house and offices having been thoroughly cleaned, I have the pleasure of being again at home & address you from my office table. My family will be in Town this week as I have written for them. Of the seven gentlemen in my office, and the Messenger none have died, tho it was kept open by one of them & the messenger thro the whole time. Five of them...
I have the honor to assure you of my perfect health after eight days residence in Philada. The Town has filled much since my last. Messrs. Willing, Bingham, Shippen, Burd, Dallas, Delany, Macpherson, Butler, Tilghman, and very many others whom I do not remember, have returned to Town. I expect my family every Moment—I have not heard of any person, even the cleaners of houses, who have been...
I have the honor to inform you that I have been engaged thro this week in attempts to provide for you an house fit for the reception of your family but have not yet succeeded. Genl. Knox is also payeing attention to the matter & we shall certainly accommodate you, if in our power. He is of opinion that it will not be proper to refuse £300 per annum for Mrs. Keppelis house at the corner of Arch...
I have the honor to inclose to you a translation of a letter lately received by me from General Rochambeau the younger.—During his late residence in Philadelphia he often manifested to me a concern for the preservation of Harmony between the two countries; and just before his departure he expressed some apprehensions of the reverse, at least so far as feelings were concerned, on the side of...
It The Reasons which induced me to the freedom of my communication concerning our Affairs with France have prompted me to that which I have now the honor respectfully to submit to your consideration in the same guarded and confidential manner, it has It appeared to me in the month of Feby last that some persons of weight and even in the Government itself had adopted the Opinion, that France...
It was my wish to have forwarded to you sooner, the enclosed paper, No. 6, by way of answer to the queries I had the honour to receive from you, the 26th of last month, but I could not revise the facts with sufficient care, till this time. You will observe, I have pursued a mode different from that which the form of the queries pointed out, thinking that “ a present state of the navigation of...
A few days ago I forwarded to you, per post, a “state of our navigation,” which I presume you have received. I have the honour to transmit you in this inclosure some notes upon two subjects, one of them of great importance, that may be useful when arranging our affairs with France and Spain. The rough draughts of these papers were made a few weeks before I received your letter, and I then...
I observe that your report upon the public debt contains some intimations of an intention of establishing a national Bank, and I learn from other gentlemen at New York that something of the kind is proposed. I do not know any of the outlines of the plan but think it may be useful to lay before you the enclosed paper which was published here during the contest concerning our Bank. It was my...
[ Philadelphia, April 6, 1790. On May 1, 1790, Hamilton wrote to Coxe : “Yours of the 6th of the same month also came to hand.” Letter not found. ]
[ Philadelphia, April 27, 1790 . On May 1, 1790, Hamilton wrote to Coxe : “I have just received your letter of the 27th of April.” Letter not found. ]
I find by several letters from New York that the bill relative to the residence has hitherto stood its ground, which affords a further hope that this agitating business will be settled by the present Attempt. It has really become necessary for the Government has been exceedingly depreciated by it even here. Many who consider it as a great Object, still think it not worth the expence of time,...
I am now at my father’s on my way to Jersey to spend a day or two with my two eldest Children before I finish the time proposed for my Absence. The public Creditors had a small meeting last Night, and appointed a new standing Committee. They appeared moderate & prudent, but solicitous for a good funding System. They did not attempt any business or resolutions, but left every thing in the...
I send you two books & five papers found in the files relative to Mint & coinage —also the weights of the principal coins of the Nations you mentioned taken from the Bank information. Tomorrow afternoon the Assays are to be made. I have not yet got the copper cost & charges. I find the old dollar (the best) in Sir I. N.s tables, which is 17.12 gr. valued at 4/6 would make the Dutch Ducatoon of...
You will find enclosed a very rough copy of Leslies improvement of the proposition of Hatton and Whitehurst —for an invariable Standard of length, capacity & weight. This is his original corrected &ca. by me of wch. Mr Jefferson has the fair copy. Genl. S. will be able to make it out. The printed roll contains a plan of state finance proposed by Mr. R Morris, which having relation to the Bank...
The account of the Chinese trade is in many respects similar to information and conformable to experience I have had. I do not observe any thing contrary to what I have heard from authority. The accot. of the East India trade is minute so far as it goes, and gives some useful information. The increase of the consumption of the finer kinds of Teas deserves notice. The quantity of Specie (at 2...
The Secretary of the Treasury, in obedience to the order of the house of Representatives of the fifteenth day of January last, has applied his attention, at as early a period as his other duties would permit, to the subject of manufactures, and particularly to the means of promoting such as will tend to render the United States independent on foreign Nations for military and other essential...
The bill relative to the debt having passed thro the House I hope an handsome conclusion will be made to the business of the Departments. I should not have troubled you again upon [it], but that I am well informed that a Member of the Senate, who opposed the bill in its present Shape said a week ago that “the whole of the Treasury clauses except the Compensations would be struck out in the...
I understand from Mrs. Hamilton that you do not expect to return from Newark for several days from which I conclude that you mean to make a complete arrangement of the Business of the Manufacturing Society. I am heartily glad of this tho I could have wished you were returned as I have gone thro the preparation of all the instructions, forms &ca. which are rendered necessary by the Alterations...
Treasury Department, Revenue Office, May 28, 1792. Encloses contract “for the digging and building of a well for the Use” of the Delaware lighthouse. Discusses “the causes of the extraordinary expence.” LC , RG 58, Letters of Commissioner of Revenue, 1792–1793, National Archives.
Treasury Department, Revenue Office, May 31, 1792. “Prior to the recommencement of the building of the Light House on Bald Head, I found it necessary to make an examination of that part of the work which has been executed under the direction of the Commissioners appointed by the Legislature of North Carolina: and I do myself the Honor to state to you some ideas that have occured, together with...
Treasury Department, Revenue Office, June 20, 1792. Transmits “for the purpose of submission to the President a contract entered into between the Superintendent of the Delaware light House, piers &c. and Thomas Davis and Thomas Connaroe junior, for the replacing of one of the piers which formed the harbour near Mud Island, which pier was carried away by the Ice at the Breaking up of the River...
Among the Cases, which have been brought before the Auditor of the Treasury and myself in consequence of the 7th. Section of “the Act making Alterations in the Treasury and War Department” is one in which the Secretary at War is the Claimant. In a conference with the Auditor it appeared to Us a matter of doubt whether the Case is within the meaning of the law, and I do myself the honor to make...
Treasury Department, Revenue Office, June 27, 1792. Encloses “a contract between the Superintendant of the Delaware light House and Benjamin Price for two mooring Chains for two of the Beacon boats stationed in the bay of Delaware.” LC , RG 58, Letters of Commissioner of Revenue, 1792–1793, National Archives. William Allibone.
Treasury Department, Revenue Office, June 28, 1792. Discusses the advantages and disadvantages of “three contracts for Stakeage in the rivers and Bays of North Carolina from the port of Beaufort inclusively to the northern part of Albemarle sound.” LC , RG 58, Letters of Commissioner of Revenue, 1792–1793, National Archives.
Among the papers which I had the honor to present to You, several suggestions in regard to the compensations to the Inspectors of the Revenue for ports will be observed. When the directions of the Legislature in regard to foreign distilled Spirits, wines and teas are considered it will be perceived, that the duties of the port Inspectors of the Revenue, and those of the Inspectors of the...
Agreeably to your desire I have the honor to in-close to you a draught of a supplementary arrangement of the Business of the Revenue, and of the compensations to the Officers employed in the supervision, inspection and collection thereof, grounded upon the plan delineated in the act of the President of the 15th. day of March 1791. In transmitting this draught for your modification and for...
In pursuance of the powers and authorities vested in me by the Acts of Congress (of the 3d. of March 1791. and the Eighth of May 1792.) relative to the duties on distilled spirits and to the collection thereof, the following alterations and additions to the arrangement of Officers and distribution of compensations made on the 15. day of March 1791. are hereby adopted and established. 1st. The...