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The H. of R. have not yet determined— The Question is to be calld up on Monday— But the opposition who now call themselves the virtuous Majority, will endeavour Still to postpone it. It is now avowed by M r Bond, the British Chargé D’affaires that the Surrender of the Posts is suspended upon the determination of the H. of R. and who could expect it would be otherwise? I have read “The...
The Senate is to meet at Ten, this morning and I hope will finish: but it is still uncertain. I shall Sett out this Afternoon, provided the senate rises— But I shall not be able to reach New York by tomorrow night— if I am not restrained from riding on sunday I may arrive on that day: But on Sunday or Monday I think, barring accidents, you may expect me. I have been detained so long, the hot...
I must now most Seriously request you to come on to me as soon as conveniently you can. never did I want your assistance more than at present, as my Physician and my Nurse. my disorder of Eight years standing has encreased to such a degree as to be very troublesome and not a little alarming.— I have agreed to take Col Smith and his Family and Furniture into the House with us and they will be...
Our good Friend General Lincoln gave me this morning your favour of the 7 th which compensated in Part of my Disappointment by Mondays Post. I sett my heart on one Letter a Week and as many more as you please. I cannot say that my desire of Fame increases. It has been Strong in some Parts of my Life but never so strong as my Love of honesty. I never in my Life that I know of sacrificed my...
Last Week I received through M r Izard a kind Invitation to dine with M rs Powell, whom I had not before seen Since her Loss of M r Powell. Yesterday I had the Pleasure of dining with her and her Brother & sister Francis with their Children and M r & M rs Harrison among the rest—M r & M rs Morris & M r Izard— M rs Powell sends many Compliments to you and regrets that she cannot enjoy your...
I hope you will not communicate to any body the hints I give you about our Prospects: but they appear every day worse and worse. House Rent at 2700 dollars a Year 1500 dollars for a Carriage 1000 for one Pair of Horses— All the Glasses ornaments kitchen furniture—the best Chairs settees, Plateaus &c all to purchase—All the China Delph or Wedgwood Glass & Crockery of every sort to purchase—and...
Entre nous M r sheerjashub Bourne called upon me the other Morning to ask me some Questions about M r Blacks farm and Capt n. Beale’s farm. He says both are to be sold— Beale asks ten thousand Dollars for his New House and farm—and the same for Squantm— M r Blacks asks Eighteen thousand but it is Supposed would take fifteen. I hope in mercy Bourn will not buy— Our present Neighbours are I...
This day I rec d yours of the 2 d. — I have rec d all the Votes from all the States. it is known that Georgia voted with N.C. V. and N.Y. and Kentucky voted for Jefferson. There is no other Newspaper circulated in the back Country of the Southern States than Freneau’s National Gazette, which is employed with great Industry to poison the Minds of the People. The Fœderal Court has again had a...
The Travelling I Suppose has retarded the Post of this Week, till to Day, when I received your two Letters of the 4 th. and 8 th. I am happy to Day in the Company of our Charles, who arrived at my Invitation from New York as fat as a Squab or Duck. M r Burr Says he is a Steady Man of Business. He is gone to the Drawing Room and Play. A Debate in Senate disappointed me of the female...
I shall inclose with this, some Letters between Randolph and Hammond which will shew you how quarelsome they are. Poor Fellows! They both desire Peace, but think themselves obliged to wrangle for their Countries. It is fashionable to charge Wars upon Kings: but I think Le Peuple souvereign is as inflamable, and as proud and at the Same time less systematick, uniform & united: so that it is not...
This is one of my red Letter Days. It is the Anniversary of the Signature of the Declaration of an Armistice between The U.S. and G. Britain, in 1783.— There are Several of these Days in my Calandar, which I recollect as they pass in review, but which nobody else remembers. And indeed it is no otherwise worth my while to remember them than to render an Ejaculation of Gratitude to Providence...
I have nothing to write you at this moment but Scandal, and that about one of our Connections and Acquaintances, in whose Character and Fortunes Several of our near Relations and kind Friends are deeply interested for which Reason I write in Confidence and pray that Calumny if it is such may not be propagated from me nor in my name. It is reported here in Company of senators and others of...
I am now Settled.— The first night I went to a M r Alders, opposite to M r Binghams, but not liking the circumstance of living in an English Family an Upholsterer lately emigrated and not admiring the Rooms, I removed last night to Francis’s Hotel in 4 th. Street, between Market and Chesnut Streets. Here I Shall be at School with a Society of Patriotic Members of Congress who are all, virtuous...
By the Post of Yesterday I received your kind Letter of the 4 th. of this month, and, by it, was relieved from a great Anxiety on Account of your health and that of Louisa. The News from the orchard is also very pleasant, I wish I could hear as good News from Hancocks Meadow. A Covering would keep it warm But I leave all to your better Judgment. No senate Yet.— M rs Morris by her son has...
I have, this minute rec d your favour of the 22 d. The Report of the Presidents Resignation is probably designed to prevent the Rise of the Stocks: but the Insolence which appears every day in Baches and Freneaus Papers, proceeding from the Same Persons who are tired of abusing me, may be carried to a point that he will not bear. He has not been used to such threshing and his skin is thinner...
On Saturday I Saw our sons Letter to the Secretary of State. M r Randolph expressed his intire Satisfaction in it. Said “it was a justification of the Propriety of his appointment, a Presage of his future Usefulness: and well digested, well arranged and well connected.” a handsome Compliment. In this Letter he says M r Jay had shewn him the whole Negotiation with Britain— He Speaks very...
I thank you for presenting a Barrell of Flour to my Mother, and wish you to do every Thing for her Comfort, that lies in your Power. My Duty to her.— Ames is not here nor is any other Vessell bound to Boston. We shall send more Flour as soon as there is Opportunity. I am glad to hear that at length after 5 or 6 Years meditation you have made your Visit to M rs Miller and M rs Vezey. I am...
I am lodged at M r Otis’s and am personally well accommodated: but I am So little pleased with living alone at any Lodgings, that this shall be the last time. You must come to me another Year or I will come to you. I am convinced if you were now here you would again be sick for the damp and chill is very penetrating. Next fall, I hope your health will be better. How the Election is gone I know...
I wrote you last Week and inclosed an order for 600. Let me know when you receive it. Although the Weather is the most beautiful I ever knew in December, the Time Seems longer to me, than ever any time did in America— The Business of Congress this session is Dulness Flatness and Insipidity itself. M r Cranch went off, on Fryday for Washington as he intended to go to Anapolis, I gave him a...
I rec d. Yesterday your kind favour of the 11 th. I have not been able lately to write you so much as I wished. The President has appointed M r Jay to go to England as Envoy Extraordinary, in hopes that Satisfaction may be obtained for the Injuries done us in the Capture of our Vessells. I have no very Sanguine hopes of his Success, but if any Man can Succeed I presume he is as likely as any....
I had Yesterday the Pleasure of yours of January 5. I will Send, to M r Adams a Check upon the Branch Bank for two hundred Dollars as soon as I can get Thomas to transact the Business for me. I am glad to find that you have had Applications for the Farms— I wish you to hear them all and enquire their Characters and Circumstances We are all of Us here, very much concerned for Cheesman. he has...
I wish the new Year may be the happiest of your Life. Last Night I had a Visit from D r Rush, whose Tongue ran for an hour.— So many Compliments, so many old Anecdotes. To be Sure, My Election he Said, he had vast pleasure in assuring me Since it had been made certain had given vast Satisfaction in this City and State. Even those who had voted for another had a great Affection for me. M r...
Yesterday I came to Senate as usual on a monday morning pleasing my Imagination and my heart with the hope and Expectation of a Letter from—my dearest Friend. No Letter for The Vice President Says Mathers! All Day in bad humour—dirty Weather—wet walking—nothing good—nothing right. The poor Post Offices did not escape—it was some blunder—some carlessness of theirs—in Philadelphia—New York or...
I received to day, together, your Favours of the 31 st December 1796 and 1. Jan. 1797 Our H. of R. boasts that We are the most enlightened People in the World: but We behave like the most ignorant Babies, in a thousand Instances. We have been destroying all Terror of Crimes and are becoming the Victims of them. We have been destroying all Attachment and Obligation to Country and are Sold in...
Since the Certainty has arrived of the very honourable Reelection of our Friend M r Smith of S. Carolina, the wiser Part of the Community have been the more anxious for that of M r Ames. The Orrery from Boston, which arrived Yesterday has excited great Expectations, that the District in which Boston is placed, will not disgrace itself by disgracing Sound Principles and independent Conduct in...
Yesterday I attended the Dedication of a Temple. The Presbyterian Congregation in Market Street, have taken down their old Meeting House, and erected a new one, in the Same Place, much larger higher, more light, airy and elegant. They assembled in it for the first time, Yesterday, when D r Ewing preached in the Morning and D r Blair in the Afternoon. I recollected with Pleasure upon this...
General Lincoln setts out Tomorrow, and I should not dare to let him go without a Love Letter to you. After a November December and January the fairest softest and finest that ever were known in this Place, The Month of February has been ushered in by a considerable Snow: but the Weather is again so fine that the sun will soon restore Us the naked ground: I should like it better in its White...
I rec d your favour of the 9 th. Yesterday. The Weather is now extream Cold. The River is frozen and a snow covers the Ground. If the Season is as sharp and at the Same time so fine with you, it will present a good Opportunity to cross the Mill Pond. It was judicious Advice and a prudent determination to cutt your Wood this Winter from the Mountain: and I hope you will pursue your Plan of...
Yesterday I had your favour of 16. M r Osgoods sermon has been printed here. I have heard M r Gardiner, hinted at as the Writer of the Jacobiniad— some think M r Paine himself writes it. I am sorry for M r Cleverlys Mortification and think the Cause of it might have been avoided. I am Still afraid I shall not be able to get away, so soon as I once hoped.— I will Spend as much time as I can...
The Die is cast, and you must prepare yourself for honourable Tryals. I must wait to know whether Congress will do any Thing or not to furnish my House— if they do not I will have no House before next Fall. and then a very moderate one, with very moderate Furniture. The Prisoners from Algiers arrived Yesterday in this City, in good health and looking very well. Capt n. stevens is among them....
D r Blair has resigned and D r Green is our Chaplain, but Miss Blair is married to M r Roberdeau the Bearer of this Letter, son of my old Friend the General. There is an universal and respectful Inquiry after you and your health, and as general a respect and Attention shewn to me. The Savages who shoot from the Swamps and thickets, from the Brakes and Briars from the Mud and Dirt, are all...
I have made the necessary Inquiry concerning Seeds And have found the Price so extravagant that I have concluded it imprudent to purchase any for Capt n Beal, D r Welsh M r Dexter D r Tufts or myself. And I desire you to purchase or request D r Tufts to purchase for me one hundred and twenty Pounds of Clover Seed. The Second Crop of Clover, from which alone they thresh the Seeds in...
I am weary of this Scæne of Dulness. We have done nothing and Shall do nothing this Session, which ought to be done, unless We Should appropriate a Sufficient Sum of Money, for treating with the Algerines. We are afraid to go to War, though our Inclinations and Dispositions are Strong enough to join the French Republicans. It is happy that our Fears are a Check to our Resentments: and our...
I promised you in my last an Account of the Commencement in the Methodists Meetinghouse north fourth st. near Vine street. But as a Bill which had some Allusion to the late Rebellion, and consequently interested the feelings of Parties, came on in Senate I could not get out of my Chair till three O Clock, and was therefore disappointed. I sent at once and bought the Books: but as I have made a...
M rs Swan and her Daughters, conducted by M rs Otis came into the Senate Chamber this morning to see the Room and Pictures. There I had Opportunities to see for the first time the fair young Ladies. I send you Guillotina, the most wanton Muse of the whole ten.— dreadful Truths are told in jest— Dallas tho, innocent , Dallas is much injured. I have now rec d Votes from Kentucky the last state:...
We have had Such falls of Snow and rain that I Suppose the Mail has been retarded and I have no Letters; and you may be in the same Case. I have written however as regularly as usual. I have no Letters nor Message from our dear Family at N. York Since their arrival excepting a Line from Charles the next morning announcing it. another fort night and I shall sett out on my return home I shall...
The public Prints, announce the Death of my old esteemed Friend General Roberdeau, whose Virtues in heart Searching Times endeared him to Philadelphia and to his Country. His friendly Attention to me, when Congress held their Sessions at York Town, I can never forget, and excites a more lively Interest in his Loss than that of some others who have lately gone before him. M r King is re-elected...
After Spending a Day and a Night at East Chester with our Children there and another at Newyork with our Children there I came to this City on Fryday night after a cold ride of 80 miles from Elizabeth Town. There are great Complaints of Want of Water for grinding, for Cattle and for Families through the whole Country. Yesterday I dined with the President in Company with John Watts the King of...
We may ever remember The Thirtieth of November because it was the Day on which We were absolved from Infamy; in 1782 and because it was the Day on which I entered this City in 1793. Finding by all accounts that the Pestilence was no more to be heard of, and that M r Otis had returned to his House, I drove directly to Market Street and took Poss n. of my old Chamber and bed. The principal...
This Day having been devoted to Thanksgiving by the Governor of Pensilvania, Congress have adjourned to Fryday. We have had a great Snow and afterwards a great Rain but not enough to carry off all the Snow. The Weather therefore is still cool, tho fair and pleasant. All Apprehension of the Fever Seems entirely departed, a Circumstance the more comfortable to me, as, having been among a few of...
Your delicious Letter of the 5 th. came to my hand Yesterday. Your beautiful and pathetic Reflections on the Match in our Presidential Family are such as I expected. It is to me, one of the most delightful Ideas that is treasured in my Mind, that my Children have no Brothers nor sisters of the half or quarter Blood. one such Consciousness would poison all the Happiness of my Life.— “Remembered...
I Send you, at present the Negotiations with M r Hammond as I sent you before those with M r Genet. I wish I could send you “The Example of France a Warning to Britain” a Pamphlet of Arthur Young the Secretary of Sir John Sinclairs Agricultural Society: but it is borrowed and must be returned. He is more Burkish than Burke I think. Congress will do little this session I believe and perhaps the...
The Presidents Speech is so important to the Public that I know you will be anxious to See it as early as possible. When the Answers of the two Houses come to be debated We shall See whether there are any Apologists for Rebellion, in these Sanctuaries. As M r Edwards of Kentucky appeared in Senate to Day, We can do Business if one Member should be Sick, but it will be very inconvenient to have...
It is a common Observation of Old People, that as they advance in Life time appears to run off faster, and the Years grow shorter. I cannot, I am Sure, Say the Same of the time which has passed of late. I took Possession of this Chamber on the 8 th. of this Month, and the time has seemed at least as long to me as any fifteen days of my whole Life. tedious days! and lonesome nights! I am weary...
Our Coach is Still immoveable. The Anarchical Warriours are beat out of all their Entrechments by the Arguments of the Friends of Peace and order. But Party Spirit is blind and deaf. totally destitute of Candour—unfeeling to every candid sentiment. The People are alarmed and Petitions are coming from all Quarters, mostly in favour of the Treaty. The Business will not be finished, if the first...
You have sometime since, I presume, received my Letters inclosing those of our son Thomas of the 19 th. of October: You have also I hope and doubt not been informed by Col smith or Charles of the good Fortune of our Daughter, who on the twenty Eighth of January went to bed in good health as could be expected with an healthy Daughter. I congratulate you on all these prosperous Events, and wish...
I know not how to throw off, the Lassitude that hangs upon me.—weary of a daily round, which to me is more confined and more insipid than to any other. I would gladly go home: but at a time So critical as this, it would not be justifiable, to quit my Post if there were no particular Reasons against it. But as the Senate is nearly divided in all great questions, and the President pro tem, has...
I Spent a pleasant Day before Yesterday with M rs Smith and her Children at East Chester where they now live. At night the Col & his two Brothers came home from hunting Patridges and Quails an Amusement which had engaged them two Days. Halcyon Days are over, at that house but Horses are still very plenty. Yesterday I came to Town and have been happy with My son and Daughter here. The Baby is...
I went to Senate this morning with Expectations highly raised of receiving my first Letter from you: and happily was not disappointed. I began to entertain fears for your health. I know not how to account for it, but your Short Accounts of the Progress of Business upon the farm Serves as a Substitute for the Pleasure of Seeing it as it goes on: and every Word of it is a cordial drop. The...
Through the finest Fields of Wheat Rye, Barley Oats and Clover, but very indifferent Roads We arrived on Saturday all well The Senators to the Number of five or six and twenty are in Town and will meet in this Chamber at Eleven O Clock. I can form no Judgment how long We shall sitt. I congratulate you and all good People on the favourable decision of the Elections in New York which indicates a...