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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
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I have rec d yours of January 22 d. I know not the reason you had not rec d Letters for a Week— There has not been a Week since I arrived in Philadelphia that I have not written you twice or thrice I agree with you that Something must be done for my Mother to make her Condition comfortable and respectable. A Horse and Chaise must be at her Command and I like your other Plan very well if she...
Your favour of Nov. 30, I received this morning. As every Thing conspires to keep me poor, I may as well give Way as not: so I will even agree to purchase Pratts Pew: But when I can send you Money to pay for it I know not— The Appropriation Bill is not passed and when it will be brought forward is uncertain, I will Send to the Treasury however and see if I can get a quarter without it. If I...
Your favour of the 28 th. Ult. arrived this morning. before this time I hope you have received your furniture. We are Still endeavouring to preserve Peace. But one moves a Series of commercial Regulations, another a Sequestration of Debts, a third to prohibit all Intercourse with Britain, a fourth to issue Letters of Mark against Algerines, all tending to excite suspicions in Britain that We...
Upon the receipt of your excellent Letter of the fifth of this month I Yesterday sent for our son Thomas and desired him to remit to his Brother at Boston for your Use two hundred Dollars. I have been at Expence to Purchase a Horse Saddle Bridle and Saddlebags to fix out Thomas to ride the Circuit with his Master M r Ingersol. He begins his Journey on the 28 th of this Month. This has left me...
I am impatient to return but partly on Account of my Son who wishes to Stay at Colledge as long as he can, and partly, on Account of my Books and other Things which I wish to get ready before I go, to be sent to N. Y. I fear I shall not see you these three Weeks. I should however break away if I were not necessitated to wait for my horse, whose Lameness is not wholly cured. Excepting the...
In your Letter of Dec r 23 d you Say “Faxon wants Money to buy, three Cows and four young Cattle.”— I know not the Price of Stock: but if you can purchase him what he wants at a reasonable rate and can finds means to pay for them I shall be content. but I would employ Some one to purchase them in Bridgwater or Abington. Faxon himself is not So judicious as he ought to be, in Some Things. I...
I was not a little Surprized, a few days ago at receiving a Letter from D r Hutchinson as Secretary to the Philosophical society in this City certifying my Election as a Member of that Body. This Gentleman you know has been celebrated for his opposition to my Election as V.P. one of the Society since told me, that when I was nominated they all rose up and cryed out that I had been a Member...
The Weather has been so disagreable and the Roads so bad, that I have not been able to advance farther on my Journey than to Bulls Tavern in this Town where I arrived last night after an unpleasant ride in the snow from Springfield. It Snowed all last night and has blocked up the roads so that I cannot move onwards till monday. I have fallen into Several curious Conversations, on the road,...
Yesterday the President sent his Carriage for me to go with the Family to the Theatre. The Rage and the Spoiled Child were the two Pieces. it rained and the House was not full. I thought I perceived a little Mortification. M r George Washington & his fair Lady were with Us. Yours of 21 st gives me a Satisfactory Account of farming. I think I would engage Billings if I could— I must leave it to...
The Door Keeper has just brought me your kind Letter of Dec r 28. Freneau’s Paper is discontinued and Fenno’s is become a daily advertising Paper and has not yet been worth Sending you. The State Papers will be reprinted in Russells Paper which you have and there has been nothing else worth Reading. I Send you the Negotiations with Genet, inclosed. The Algerines will cost this Country very...
The Anxiety you express (in your kind Letter of Dec r 31 which I received this morning ) for your Country and the Happiness of your Children is very amiable. The Prospects of this Country are gloomy, but the Situation of all Europe is calamitous beyond all former Examples. At what time and in what manner and by what means, the Disasters which are come and Seem to be coming on Mankind may be...
We have floods of rain but no frost nor Snow and very little news. The Democrats continue to pelt as you will See by the inclosed Political Chess. We go on as We always have done, for the three first months of the Session, distributing Business into the hands of Committees, meeting and adjourning. The Gallery finds little Entertainment in our Debates. We have Seldom more than 30 or 40 in it...
We took the Packet at New Haven, and arrived at N. York as Soon as the Stage— Although We Saved no time, We avoided some bruizes, at the Expence of a little of the Mal De Mer. M rs Smith and Children all well. Charity Smith married to M r Shaw, Brother of the late Consul at Canton.— Our Charles at Steuben after an Examination at Albany and an honourable Admission to the Rank of Counciller at...
The Sensations of Ap. 19. 1775 and those of this Morning have some Resemblance to each other. a Prospect of foreign War and civil War in conjunction is not very pleasant. We are a poor divided Nation in the midst of all our Prosperity. The H. of R. after debating 3 Weeks about asking for Papers are now beginning another Discussion which may last as long on the Merits and Demerits of the...
The Senate were obliged to Spend the whole of the last Week, in a Solemn Tryal of the Election of M r Gallatin: and I find that a great Impression has been made upon the Public, by the Learning Eloquence and Reasoning of Some of the Senators. The Decision has given general Satisfaction. That Popularity was more courted than Truth by a few Individuals, I fear will be the Judgment of some of the...
I believe I have not directly & expressly Answered your Letter, inclosing the Memorandum from M r Smith of the Price of a Chariot at Boston. I had before bespoke a new Chariot here, and it is or will be ready: so that there is an End of all further Enquiries about Carriages.— I hope as soon as the Point is legally settled you will have your Coach new Painted and all the Arms totally...
I rec d Yesterday together your Letters of the 28. 29. and 30 th of January. It is impossible for me to give any Directions about our affairs at Quincy. I shall be hurried here with Business and Ceremony. I like your Plan to get Mears but fear he will not agree to it. When you come here I hope you will bring all the Women you want. I would not have any other than N. England Women in the House...
At Hartford, finding the Roads obstructed with Such Banks of Snow, as were impassable with Wheels I left my Chaise with M r Frederick Bull of that town to be sent to Boston, and my Horses to be sent after me, and took to the Mail Stage. We happened to have agreable Passengers, and arrived here on Wednesday night. as I had little sleep for several nights, I found myself fatigued, a little...
It is proper that I should apprize you, that the President has it in contemplation to Send your son to Holland, that you may recollect yourself and prepare for the Event. I make this Communication to you, in Confidence, at the desire of the President communicated to me Yesterday by the Secretary of State. You must keep it an entire Secret, untill it shall be announced to the Public in the...
Senate has been three days in debate upon the Appointment of M r Jay, to go to London. It has this day been determined in his favour 18 v s. 8. You cannot imagine what horror some Persons are in, least Peace Should continue. The Prospect of Peace throws them into Distress. Their Countenances lengthen at the least opening of an Appearance of it. Glancing Gleams of Joy beam from thier Faces...
We have had an agreable Journey to this Town, have been to Meeting all Day and heard two excellent Discourses from M r Strong: We are to drink Tea at Col Wadsworths. Trumbul and his Lady are at New Haven. At four or five O Clock in the Morning We proceed. The Weather to day is Soft and fine, tho We had last night a violent Wind & Rain. Accounts from Philadelphia are unanimous in favour of the...
I rec d this morning your favour of Feb. 22.—the more agreable as it was not very confidently expected. I should be glad to see M r Copley. Charles brought the Treaty from Col. John Smith who brought it from Lisbon. I hope you will have Letters by the Vessell you mention from Rotterdam. The Treaties with Spain & Algiers have been unanimously Sanctioned by senate and that with Britain is...
This Day seven Years I first took my seat in Senate and I hope I shall not sit there seven Years longer. The H. continues constant—some Conjecture that by one means or another they will comply after sometime: but I see no present appearance of it. I pray with you for the Prosperity of Zion but that is all I can do. The Town of Boston is under a bad Influence in the Hands of unwise and I fear...
Your Favours of Feb. 26 and Feb. (blank) arrived not till last night. They deserve my best Thanks on all accounts. They are full of Entertainment and Instruction. S. is as Slippery as an Eel: He is not worth quarrelling with: but certainly is not to be trusted:— His Treaty with Spain is a great Curiosity. I am really at a loss to guess, whether it was Ignorance or Impudence. He has so much of...
last night I arrived at Philadelphia in tolerable Health and found our Friends all well. I have concluded to accept of the kind offer of Mr and M rs Otis and taken a bed in their House. Thomas is charmingly accommodated and is very well. This Day decides whether I shall be a Farmer or a Statesman after next March. They have been flickering in the Newspapers and caballing in Parties: but how...
I Yesterday rec d the Letter inclosed from my Son and in the Evening the President told me he had Letters from him. You will perceive the Prudence of reserving to yourself the hint in his Letter to me, as every Thing of the Kind will be eagerly Seized and easily exaggerated. The Treaties are all ratified by the Senate and Yesterday M r Elsworths Nomination was consented to as Chief Justice, by...
Your favours of 18 th. and 19 th instant are so full of your Plans and Labours in Agriculture, that I begin to be jealous you will acquire a Reputation as a Farmer that will quite eclypse my own. I rejoice at length that all Tenants are dispossessed and that Land stock and Utensils are now at our own Disposal.— I am glad you have bought a Yoke of oxen and hope you will buy a farm horse. Our...
We go Slowly forward: So Slowly as to produce no Results, which is a better course than to run rapidly in a Career of Mischief. I go to Senate every day, read the News papers before I go and the Public Papers afterwards, see a few Friends once a Week, go to Church on Sundays; write now and then a Line to you and to Nabby: and oftener to Charles than to his Brothers to See if I can fix his...
I rec d Yesterday your favour of 23. of Dec r. from Boston. The old Patrioch, has got a Name of Old Scrathum, or old Scratch or Some Such Oddity that will amuse the Blackguards for a time. M rs Storers Verses are very shrewd The Story of my Muteness, or Incapacity to talk, I almost wish were true.— On Some Occasions. D r Walters Politeness to be Sure is conspicuous. It is enough at present to...
Yesterday which was Post Day from the Eastward I was disappointed again of a Letter and went pesting all the day long against the Post office. But this morning has produced me yours of the 15 th which informs me that you meet with similar Dissappointments. There has not one Post parted from Philadelphia for Boston Since I have been here without a Letter from me to You. Wednesdays and Saturdays...
I had just Sent off to the Poet office, my Letter in which I requested a Diary of Husbandry when I went to The Senate Chamber where I found your Letter of the 10 th , which contained the very Thing I had asked for, very accurate & pleasing. I hope for a continuance of it, for nothing refreshes me like it, in the dull Solitude to which I am destined for four months. A Senate was made to Day, by...
I had flattered myself all the last Week with the Hope of a Letter on Monday: but when Yesterday came I found in the Door Keepers lodge of the Senate, no Letter for me, though the Post was arrived, and the other Gentlemen had their Letters. Disappointed, mortified, sometimes half resentful, but more often anxious and Apprehensive that you were sick, I passed but an unpleasant Morning: After...
We have been favoured with fine Weather and tolerable Roads in such a manner that We reached Kingsbridge on Fryday night and came into N. York by Nine o Clock on Yesterday morning. If it had not been for the Desire of seeing my Children I should have gone immediately on with the other Passengers. The stage House was so near C. Smiths and I knew not where my Son lived: so that I put up at...
We lodged at Monroe’s in Marlborough on Wednesday night, at Hithcocks in Brookfield Thursday night, at David Bulls in Hartford Fryday night and at Lovejoys in Stratford last night. I have been to hear Sound orthodox Calvinism from M r Stebbins this morning. At Hartford I Saw M r Adets Note in Folio to our Secretary of State, and I find it an Instrument well calculated to reconcile me to...
I arrived here Yesterday, and had the Pleasure to dine with our Children and The Baron: All are very well and send their Duty. Charles is well, fat and handsome, and persists in the Line of Conduct which We so much approved. His Business increases & he will do well. Accounts from Philadelphia continue to be favourable. M r Otis has written for his Family to come on, as M rs Smith informs me....
I rec d on Monday your two favours of 28. Feb. I am very glad you employed Pratt to cutt the Timber, for it is high time I had a Barn to shelter my Hay that the Cattle may not complain of it so much, as they do this Year, with Justice. I shall build only the shell this Year—Raise the Barn & Board & shingle it. The limed Manure upon the Hill I mean to have Spread upon the Grass Ground where it...
I dined Yesterday with M r Burr, who lives here in Style. A Number of Members of the House The Speaker M r Dayton among the Rest. It Seems to be the general Opinion that the House will express some Opinions unfavourable to the Treaty: but finally carry it into Effect. There is a good deal of Apprehension expressed for the Union, in Conversation. Some think and Say it cannot last. Such is the...
I must finally conclude to request of you to come on to New York as soon as possible and bring Charles and Thomas both with you if you can— if they cannot come at present let them follow as soon as they can be permitted.— I design they shall both Spend the Vacation here at least.— I want your Advice about furniture and House. bring Polly Taylor with you.— You had better land on Long Island and...
I have a secret to Communicate to Your Prudence. The Defence by Camillus was written in Concert between Hamilton King and Jay. The Writings on the first ten Articles of the Treaty were written by Hamilton The rest by King, till they came to the question of the Constitutionality of the Treaty, which was discussed by Hamilton— Jay was to have written a concluding Peroration: but being always a...
The Result of Saturdays Debate in the H. of R. removes all Anxiety for the Remainder of this session, and leaves me at Liberty to ask Leave to go home. The state of my own Health which requires Relaxation and the sickness in my Family and Neighbourhood, would have well justified me, if I had retired even before the great Question was decided. I shall ask Leave this Day, unless something...
I received Yesterday your kind Letter of Feb. 28. and March 1.— I can never be sufficiently thankful to you for your constant unwearied Attention and tender care of my Mother. I hope that you will be very careful of your own Health and not suffer your Solicitude and Exertions to go beyond your Strength. Our Selfish young Rogue at Boston is so taken up with his Business and his Fees, that he...
Your Account of our little domestic affairs and the Arrangements of the Farm, was very entertaining to me, and I hope you will continue to inform me of every occurrence of any consequence. I should be glad to know who is engaged to take the Care of the Place this Winter: What prospect you have of hiring a Man in the Spring by the Year: and your opinion whether I had not better engage a...
The Newspapers will inform you before this Letter reaches you that the Ratifications of the Treaty have been exchanged by M r Deas the Chargé d’Affairs under M r Pinkney. The President told me the orders were that if M r Adams did not arrive by a certain day this Business was to be done by another. Whether our Son will go over at all or not is to me uncertain. If he has lost a White Feather,...
I wrote you from Hartford, New York and once from Philadelphia: but have not yet had the Pleasure of a Letter from you Since I left home. The Night before last We had a deep Snow, which will probably extinguish all remaining apprehensions of Infection. We hear of no Sickness and all Seem at their Ease and without fear. The Presidents Speach will Shew you an Abundance of Serious Business which...
Why! this is very clever— Every Monday and every Thursday brings me regularly a Letter, which Softens the Tædium Vitæ The Ennui of Life, in this Wrangling disputacious Metropolis. So! We are to have a Quincy Academy! With all my Heart—I am willing to pay my Quota of the Expence. But Something more than a School House will be wanting for so desirable a Purpose. Oh that I had a Bosom to lean my...
I Yesterday dined in Company with M. Talleyrand de Perigord and M r Beaumez, the former late Bishop of Autun and both Members of the late Constituent assembly in France. Talleyrand made the Motion for confiscating the Property of the Clergy: which, has made him so obnoxious to the Court of Vienna, that they have persuaded the British Court to order him out of England although he had been...
We have a Turn of Weather as cold as any We have had through the whole Winter. The Violence of the North West Wind which has thrown down Chimneys and blown off Roofs in this City, We suppose has prevented the Eastern Mail from crossing the North River and deprived me of my Thursdays Letter as yet. I hope it will come to day. A Thousand and one Speeches have been made in the H. of Rep s. upon...
It has been impossible to get time to write you.— Morning, Noon, and Night, has been taken up with Business, or Visits.— Yesterday the President was Sworn, amidst the Acclamations of the People.— But I must refer you to Gazettes & Spectators.— I write this abed.— M r Allen del d. me, Yesterday your Letter.— I like very much your Plan of coming on, with Charles and Thomas, before Commencement....
Monday, which is the pleasantest day of the Week, because it always brings me a Letter, produced me your favour of the 12 th. I am ready to purchase for you, the other half of the Medford Farm, if it is to be Sold, or to advance my your half for Building, if it is not. I think you are right not to sell. keep it as a Remembrancer. Paternal Acres are always good Land. What may be Hamiltons Views...
I rec d yesterday yours of 21. and 25 Jan. The Senate and House of Massachusetts without any flights or flashes in their Answer to the Governors Spech have discovered a Gravity, Wisdom, Firmness and Dignity as much to their honour as it is to the Consolation of the Sober and impartial Part of the Community and the humiliation of all the corrupt and distracted. I See daily So many affecting...