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By the last post from Boston I recd your Letter of Nov. 18th.—I have before recd one at Quincy and another at Boston. I thank you sir for these friendly Communications, although I have not had oppertunity to answer them particularly. I was very Sensible of the importance of Congress Sitting in Philadelphia if it could be done with Safety and accordingl,y as soon as I was convinced of this...
In your letter of the 18th of August, you ask why we may not have as much paper in circulation in proportion to our circulating silver and gold, as Great Britain has in proportion to hers? Give me leave to answer you without hesitation. We may as soon as we shall have any credit.—We have none. No man of common sense will trust us. As long as an unlimited democracy tyrannized over the rich, no...
The Vice President of the United States and President of the Senate, the Chief Justice, The Secretary of State, the Secretary of the Treasury, and the Attorney General, respectfully Report to Congress as follows, That pursuant to the Act intitled “An Act making provision for the Reduction of the Public Debt” and in conformity to Resolutions agreed upon by them and severally approved by The...
It is with great pleasure, that, in obedience to an order of the Senate of the United States, I have the honor to enclose their resolution of this date, which was unanimously agreed to; and, in behalf of the Senate, I request that you will be pleased to communicate the same to the corporation of this city, and, at the same time, signify to them, that it is the wish of the Senate that the...
We go on as Usual—Congress resolving one Thing and the Democratical societies resolving the Contrary.— The President doing what is right and Clubbs and Mobs resolving it to be all wrong. We had in senate a few Days ago the greatest Curiosity of all. The Senators from Virginia moved, in Consequence of an Instruction from their Constituents, that the Execution of the 4 th. Article of the Treaty...
Your Letter from your Sick Chamber if not from your Sick bed, has made me so uneasy that I must get away as soon as possible.— Monday Morning at Six, I am to Sett off in the Stage, but how many days it will take to get home will depend on the Roads, and or the Winds. I dont believe Nabby will go with me. Her Adventurer of an Husband is so proud of his Wealth that he would not let her go I...
The Commissioners of the Sinking Fund Respectfully Report to Congress as follow. That the purchases of the Debt of the United States as stated in their Report of the eighteenth of December 1795, amount to Two Millions, three hundred, seven thousand, six hundred, sixty one dollars, and Seventy one cents, for which there have been paid in specie, One Million, six hundred, Eighteen thousand, Nine...
Every Thing has happened, as I could wish Since I left you, excepting the delay of making Provision for my Subsistance; and this has proceeded from an Uncertainty what they ought to do. I am very easy on that Point, as I am determined to live in Proportion to my allowance, I beg leave to mention one Thing, which may be of Some consequence, both to the Public and to me.—If Thomas would...
Your favor of the 31st of January I received in its season, I have at two or three several times had conversation with General Knox upon the subject of Mr. Martin Brimmer Sohier; and have the General’s promise to give particular attention to Mr. Sohier’s merit and pretensions. As the Secretary at War appeared to be well acquainted with the candidate, and to have the best disposition to serve...
The Vice President of the United States and President of the Senate, The Chief Justice, the Secretary of State, The Secretary of the Treasury and the Attorney General respectfully report to the Congress of the United States of America. That pursuant to the Act intitled an Act making provision of the reduction of the public debt and in conformity to two resolutions agreed upon by them one on...
I have receive the polite and obliging Letter, you did me the honour to write me, on the seventh of May.—Although an intimate and frequent Correspondence with you, considering the relation between Us, and the agreable Acquaintance, I had with you in France and England would have been always agreable to me; Yet considering the different Countries and Governments in which We live, and the...
I have just rec d from the P. Office your Letter of the 20 th. by Brisler who went to carry one for you— I write by every Post i.e by Mondays and Thursdays which are the only ones on which Mails are made up for any Place beyond N. York, and the only ones on which Letters arrive here from any Place beyond that City. M rs Adams your new Daughter behaves prettily in her new Sphere— I dined with...
We receive with pleasure your speech to the two Houses of Congress. In it we perceive renewed proofs of that vigilant and paternal concern for the prosperity, honor, and happiness of our country, which has uniformly distinguished your past administration. Our anxiety arising from the licentious and open resistance to the laws in the western counties of Pennsylvania, has been increased by the...
I have received from our old Acquaintance D’Ivernois the inclosed Volume for you in the Course of the last Week. I consider all Reasoning upon French affairs of little moment. The Fates must determine hereafter as they have done heretofore. Reasoning has been all lost—Passion, Prejudice, Interest, Necessity has governed and will govern; and a Century must roll away before any permanent and...
I am much obliged by your favor of the first instant with the report of the Committee: and glad to find that the bench had been filled with Characters to your satisfaction. The report of the Committee gives me concern, as it evidence of an unquiet restless spirit as it tends to encourage Rhode Island in their obstinacy: but most of all as I fear there is too much probability that it originated...
My good Genius this morning has thrown in my Way, by perfect Accident, your oration of the 4. July last, and although I read it with much pleasure, in its Season it now appeared to me, new and beautiful as ever. I am afraid I never thanked you for the handsome Compliment paid to me in a Note. Indeed I now and then get a Compliment, and do not always give thanks for it. I am informed, within a...
I have recd. the letter you did me the honour to write me on the 30th of May—but have not yet had an opportunity to See Mr Boid—Whenever that Gentleman shall appear, it will be a pleasure to me to give him all the attention and assistance in my power—which may be due to public Justice, and to your recommendation—we proceed slowly: but in digesting Plans so new, so extensive and so important it...
Mr Vanberckel informs me that you were desirous of seeing the second and third Volumes of the Defence &c. When I gave orders for the first to be sent you I expected that the other two would have been sent. I am very glad nevertheless Sir of renewing to you the assurances of my sinc e re esteem attachment and respect. My regards at the same time if you please to my friend Dr Marclane— My Fellow...
Yours of July 9 & 27 are unanswered. I cannot reconcile myself to the idea of a Division of this Continent, even fifty years hence. Great sacrifices ought to be made to Union, and an habit of Obedience to a well ordered, and judiciously limited Government, formed at this early Period. A dissolution of the union involves Consequences of so terrible a kind, that I think We ought to consent to an...
on the Commencement of the new Year I wish you health, honour, Profit and Pleasure through the Course of it, and as many repetitions of these anniversaries as shall be for your own happiness and the benefit of your Friends and Connections in the World. Application and that alone will Secure you, under the Smiles of divine Providence the Blessings of Life. Make for me the Compliments of the...
I have Just Received from your son—your Obliging Letter of this Days Date In Which as Secretary of the Corporation of the first Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia you inform me of their kind offer to me of the Pew No. 92 in their Church for the Accommodation of my Self and my Family and that I may begin to use it next Sunday. I Pray you Sir to Present my best Respects to the Corporation and...
I have received your obliging Letter of the 19th. A drawback on Rum exported is admitted by the House, and I believe will not be taken off by the Senate. The duty on Molalses will be reduced to 4 Cents and I hope to three. Your Reasoning appears to be very just and I think will prevail. The jealousies Distilleries and Breweries are natural and cannot be wholly prevented: but I hope they will...
Your favor of August 10th was duly received and immediately communicated with several other letters on the same subject to the President. His determination which will be made on the best principles and from the purest motives, as well as the most universal information, for he receives letters and makes inquiries from all quarters, we shall soon know. Altho’ it is not probable to me that Mr...
I cannot give up my dear Latin and Greek although Fortune has never permitted me to enjoy so much of them as I wished. I don’t love you the less however for your Indifference or even opposition to them. Pray do you carry your Theory so far as to wish to exclude French, Italian, Spanish, and Tudesque? I begun to fear that your multiplied phisical and other engagements had made you forget me....
It is a long time Since I have rec d any Letter from you, and the Report that you have had a Return of your Rheumatism has allarmed me— We heard that you were better but should be glad to know the Particulars. I am once more happy at home, and my Farm, by the help of a fine rainy season shines very bright.— I Should be glad to be informed, of your Plans and Views— Whether You mean to return or...
I have taken a Sheet of Paper, only to wish you an happy new Year and many happy repetitions of this Aniversary. I received yesterday a Letter, and Pacquet of his Liberty Papers and Pamphlets from M r B. Hollis dated 18. Feb. 1793. Where it has been I cannot guess. He Sends his best Wishes to you and hopes you have recovered your health and Spirits. I Suppose Columbus has now done with G— I...
I am much obliged by your favor of March 20th and very apprehensive that this is not the only letter of yours unanswered. To leave your letters unanswered is in me very bad œconomy. The General is arrived here; but has as yet said nothing to me of his business. Doctor Craigie shall have all the aid in my power to give him, in his pursuit of justice in your affair: but I do not at present see...
I rec d this morning your kind Letter of the 7 th. and wonder you had not rec d a Letter. I wrote from Stratford & Newyork and twice a Week since I have been here. your Anxiety for your Country is amiable and becomes your Character. Elevated Expectations of Grandeur and Glory as well as Prosperity have accompanied me through Life and been a great source of my Enjoyment. They are not diminished...
The inclosed Pamphlet and Papers I have received this Week from the Author, with his request to transmit them to you. I have before transmitted in the Course of this Winter, another Packet from the same Writer; but have as yet no answer from you: so that I am uncertain whether you have recd. it. Mr Jays Treaty with Britain is not yet arrived at the Secretary of States Office, though there is...
Your Letter of Feb. 6. has made so deep an Impression that it may not be amiss to make a few more Observations on it as it respects both of Us. Your Friends have been very indiscreet and certainly have not done you Justice.—Fluency and Animation are Talents of a public Speaker which alone will go a great way. I have known several rise to Fame and extensive Practice, at the Bar, and afterwards...
M r Dalton, M r Jenkes and myself are at Penfields in good health and Spirits.— My Horses perform very well and my Servant tolerably. We have met with nothing but Rocks in the Road to molest us. These have jolted us very rudely but Salubriously. I shall keep M r Dalton company to Boston at least to Cambridge. according to present Conjectures We shall Spend the Sabbath at Springfield. My Love...
Mr. Charles Adams, my Second Son, the Bearer of this Letter, I beg leave to introduce to you.—He took his degree at our University of Cambridge this year, and is destined to the Study of the Law.—I wish to get him into some office in New York, and should give the Preference to you But there are two Contingencies, one possible the other probable in the Way. The first is that Congress may force...
I received; last Evening the Letter you did me the honour to write me, the 30th of July, and am ready to give you all the Information in my power Mitchel’s Map s was the only one, which the Ministers Plenipotentiary of The United States and The Minister Plenipotentiary of great Britain made use of in their Conferences and Discussions relative to the Boundaries of the United States, in their...
Your letters put me more and more out of Patience every Post. Why, in that of the 6th. do you call our national Government a federal Republic ? It is no more that, than it is Sphœrical Trigonometry. What is a federal Republic? It is an association of a Number of independent Sovereign States. Are the Seperate States in our national Government, Sovereign and independent? If they are, We had all...
The inclosed Volume was lately sent in to me by a Servant—I have Since heard that the Author of it is in New York. The Book exhibits a curious Picture of the Government of Berne and is well worth reading. I congratulate you on the charming opening of the Spring and heartily wish I was enjoying of it as you are upon a Plantation, out of the hearing of the Din of Politicks and the Rumours of...
At twelve o’clock the Senate attended upon the President of the United States at his own House, when the President of the Senate delivered the following Address. To the President of the United States of America. We receive, Sir, with particular satisfaction the communications contained in your Speech, which confirm to us the progressive State of the public Credit, and afford at the same time,...
Our Antifœderal Scribblers are so fond of Rotations that they Seem disposed to remove their Abuses from me to the President. Baches Paper which is nearly as bad as Freneaux’s begins to join in concert with it, to maul the President for his Drawing Rooms, Levees, declining to accept of Invitations to Dinners and Tea Parties, his Birth day Odes, Visits, Compliments &c— I may be expected to be an...
I this day rec d your favours of the 8. and 12 th. but how this last could have leaped to this distance in five days I know not. It is impossible to Say precisely when Congress will rise: but I will go home as soon as possible; I hope in April. I am very willing to confide all Arrangements to you— I like shaw and his Wife: and I like Richards and Joy from your Account of them.— We will try a...
It is now determined what the President has to depend on after the 4 th March. The Committee determined against raising the Salary of P. or V. P. The House which the P. had for 500 £ cannot again be had under 1000 £ — Horses are from 3 times to five times as high as they were Seven Years ago, Carriages three times as high—Provisions &c In Short all Levees and Drawing Rooms and Dinners must be...
I congratulate you on your Admission to the Bar and your taking Possession of an Office in So good a Part of the Town, and I would not advise you to exhange it for any other, without an absolute necessity. There is a great Advantage to a Lawyer in being always to be found in the Same place. I wish you as much Success as you can desire and all the Pleasure and Profit from your Practice in a...
I have received your polite letter of the second of this month, and am obliged to you for this instance of respect and attention to me. The competition for employment under the national government, is I preceive, in Philadelphia, very numerous, and the merits of various candidates are considerable The personal knowledge of the President, and the able and faithful characters within the reach of...
I take an opportunity by part of my family bound to London, to remind you of a person who is taken once had an opportunity of knowing you personally, and to express my sympathy with you under your sufferings in the cause of Liberty. Inquisitions and Despotisms are not alone in persecuting Philosophers. The people themselves we see, are capable of persecuting a Priestly, as an other people...
I am desired by our old Acquaintance Mr. D’Ivernois to transmit you the inclosed Papers for your inspection Opinion and Advice. The poor Fellow has been obliged to fly a Second time into Banishment. The first time, he was driven out as a Democrat: but it is now, Day about, as they Say, in Geneva, and he is compelled to run, as an Aristocrat. Shall We print his History? What Shall We do with...
I thank you for your kind Letter inclosing that from our Friend Hollis. The Influenza is here as general as it was at N. York.— Your youngest Son has been laid up with it at M r Cranche’s; but is better. M r Wibird is confined with it, so that We had no Meeting. I have been to visit him: He is not very bad: but not fit to go out. My great Horse, had a Misfortune last night in the Stable, that...
I received yesterday two Letters from each of our Sons at the Hague, who were very well and in good Spirits on the 25 th of April: but the Letters contain So much Information, that I have been obliged to lend them to The Secretary of the Treasury: I shall inclose them to you however on Monday All the next Week will be taken up, I Suppose in further Investigations of the Subject before Senate,...
I have this moment received your favour of Nov. 30, and the Volume inclosed with it: an acceptable Present for which I thank you. I have not yet had the time to read it, and cannot therefore form any Opinion of its merit. By a kind of on the Anecdote of the Child drowning in the Canal at the Hague, which brought strongly to my Recollection the feelings We both experienced in that distressing...
Upon my return from Philadelphia to which beloved City I have been, for the purpose of getting an house to put my head in next Winter I had the pleasure of receiving your favour of the Second of this month. The sight of our old Liberty Hall, and of Several of our old Friends, had brought your venerable Idea to my mind, and continued it there, a great part of the last Week, so that a Letter...
I received with great pleasure your kind letter from Dover, and rejoiced in your safe arrival in England; but I have not been able to write you until now. When I was at the bar, I had commonly clerks who took off from me much of the manual labour of writing. While I was abroad I had commonly Secretaries to assist me. But now, when my hand shakes and my eyes fail, I have no one even to copy a...
The Alteration of Post Days or some other Cause has disappointed me of a Letter from you this Week, which is the first time I have failled of a Letter on Monday for several months. The Weather has been very hot and dry here. Yesterday however We had a Light shower: but to day it is very hot again. The House is slow upon the Ways and means the essential Measure which remains— But I think We...
I have this morning rec d your kind Letters of 10 & 11 th. of May.— You mention Land bought by D r Phipps which you had mentioned to me: but I have not rec d any Letter from you which hinted at any Land— By this I fear I lost a Letter last monday by some fault in the Post.— however I want no more land at present. A Pew I should like to have, and a double one too if possible.— I shall leave you...