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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
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The Public Papers will inform you that M r Jefferson has resigned and that M r Randolph is appointed Secretary of State. The Attorney General is not yet nominated. M r Lewis M r Lawrence M r Benson M r Gore, M r Potts &c have been mentioned in Conversation. The Motives to M r Jeffersons Resignation are not assigned, and are left open to the Conjectures of a Speculating World. I also am a...
Yesterday, at Boston, I received your friendly Letter of July 17th. with great pleasure. I give full credit to your relation of the manner, in which your note was written and prefixed to the Philadelphia edition of Mr. Paines pamphlet on the rights of Man: but the misconduct of the person, who committed this breach of your confidence, by making it publick, whatever were his intentions, has...
I have received with pleasure your kind letter of the 17th of March, and should be happy to have an opportunity of serving you both with regard to your services and early attachment to the cause of your country, and from an agreable recollection of your private character and my former person acquaintance with you. But the office I hold is totally detached from the executive authority, and...
I am desired by our old Acquaintance Mr. D’Ivernois to transmit you the inclosed Papers for your inspection Opinion and Advice. The poor Fellow has been obliged to fly a Second time into Banishment. The first time, he was driven out as a Democrat: but it is now, Day about, as they Say, in Geneva, and he is compelled to run, as an Aristocrat. Shall We print his History? What Shall We do with...
The Weather here is as fine as it was the last Year. The Festival season of Christmas and the new Year, is enjoyed in Perfection by all, for what I know, but poor Cabot and me. He is as solitary and disconsolate as a lone Goose. He strives to keep up his Spirits and preserve his usual Gaiety but one plainly perceives it is all Exertion. There are Letters to the secretary of State upon public...
I thank you for your kind Letter inclosing that from our Friend Hollis. The Influenza is here as general as it was at N. York.— Your youngest Son has been laid up with it at M r Cranche’s; but is better. M r Wibird is confined with it, so that We had no Meeting. I have been to visit him: He is not very bad: but not fit to go out. My great Horse, had a Misfortune last night in the Stable, that...
I received yesterday two Letters from each of our Sons at the Hague, who were very well and in good Spirits on the 25 th of April: but the Letters contain So much Information, that I have been obliged to lend them to The Secretary of the Treasury: I shall inclose them to you however on Monday All the next Week will be taken up, I Suppose in further Investigations of the Subject before Senate,...
I have this morning received your favours of Jan. 7 and February the first with the Newspapers for which I thank you— I rec d some days ago a Letter with the Review and some other Papers. I thank you for all these Marks of your kind Attention. a few Lines from you are always acceptable as they are Information of your Health and Situation, but your long Letters are fraught with such Information...
I have this moment received your favour of Nov. 30, and the Volume inclosed with it: an acceptable Present for which I thank you. I have not yet had the time to read it, and cannot therefore form any Opinion of its merit. By a kind of on the Anecdote of the Child drowning in the Canal at the Hague, which brought strongly to my Recollection the feelings We both experienced in that distressing...
I dined on Monday at the Presidents with young La Fayette and his Preceptor, Tutor or Friend, whatever they call him, whose Name is Frestel. I asked Them with M r Lear to breakfast with me this Morning and they agreed to come: but last Evening M r Lear came with a Message from The President, to ask my Opinion whether it would be adviseable for the young Gentleman, in the present Circumstances...
What is there which the new Government possesses, on which to found its authority? has it Honors? has it pleasures? has it profits to bestow, which may attract the Attention, excite the Love, or alarm the Fear, of such a Majority in every state as will compell the Minority to obedience? Has the national Government at this moment, attractions enough to make a Seat in it, an Object of Desire, to...
Upon my return from Philadelphia to which beloved City I have been, for the purpose of getting an house to put my head in next Winter I had the pleasure of receiving your favour of the Second of this month. The sight of our old Liberty Hall, and of Several of our old Friends, had brought your venerable Idea to my mind, and continued it there, a great part of the last Week, so that a Letter...
I have received your kind Letter of the 30 Jan and thank you, for your obliging Complaisance in nominating Dr. Bancroft to be a Member of our Academy and for your Compliments on the issue of the late Election. When you assure me, that your Brethren of the Clergy, of the Colledge and of the Accademy are “almost without an Exception my real Friends” you assure me of an approbation very much to...
I dined Yesterday with M r Madison. M rs Madison is a fine Woman and her two sisters are equally so: one of them is married to George Washington one of the two Nephews of the President who were sometimes at our House. M r Washington came and civilly enquired after your Health. These Ladies, whose Names were Pain, are of a Quaker Family once of North Carolina. The Treaty with Spain is arrived...
I received with great pleasure your kind letter from Dover, and rejoiced in your safe arrival in England; but I have not been able to write you until now. When I was at the bar, I had commonly clerks who took off from me much of the manual labour of writing. While I was abroad I had commonly Secretaries to assist me. But now, when my hand shakes and my eyes fail, I have no one even to copy a...
Brisler has shipped, on board The Abby Captain Eames, two Barrells of Flour, one hundred Weight of Clover Seed and half a Bushell of Herds Grass Seeds; and the Medallion: all consigned to our Friend M r Smith in Boston. As Captain Eames’s Intention was to Sail to day, I Suppose he is gone. twelve Pounds of Clover seed and two quarts at least of Herds grass seeds must be sown, when the time...
I have this Morning, filed in order your Letters and have now in one bundle before me from N o. 6 to N o. 23 inclusively and will take care they shall not be again Seperated. The Western Posts are all delivered, and the Commissions in a good Way.— M r King and M r Gore in England and I hope M r Pinkney in France, will be your Friends bothe Personally and Politically. You are destined to...
The Alteration of Post Days or some other Cause has disappointed me of a Letter from you this Week, which is the first time I have failled of a Letter on Monday for several months. The Weather has been very hot and dry here. Yesterday however We had a Light shower: but to day it is very hot again. The House is slow upon the Ways and means the essential Measure which remains— But I think We...
I have this morning rec d your kind Letters of 10 & 11 th. of May.— You mention Land bought by D r Phipps which you had mentioned to me: but I have not rec d any Letter from you which hinted at any Land— By this I fear I lost a Letter last monday by some fault in the Post.— however I want no more land at present. A Pew I should like to have, and a double one too if possible.— I shall leave you...
The inclosed letter from Mr Taylor one of the Senators from Virginia, as it contains Information which may become useful to the Agriculture of the Northern Parts of America I request the favour of you to communicate it to the American Accademy of Arts and Sciences. I am Sir with great / and Sincere Esteem, your most / obedient Servant MBAt : American Academy of Arts and Letters Collection.
I have received and read with much pleasure your kind letter of the 20th: Ult; Your sympathy with me under the Case effusions of mallice and falshood ought to be converted into shame for your Country, which wanted virtue, sense and spirit to discountenance what will remain a lasting disgrace to America to the Press and to letters. A Brown, a Markoe, & a Finley, suffered to insult for a whole...
The Old Debtors to British subjects, united with the over Zealous Friends of France and the Democratical societies of our principal Cities, are urging a sequestration of Things in Action: and as I know you are not inattentive to any question of public Law, I have inclosed you some minutes of Authorities and I wish you to look into all others relative to this subject. I have not Grotius here,...
173July 26. 1796. Tuesday. (Adams Papers)
Cloudy and begins to rain, the Wind at N.E. The Men gone up the Hill to rake the Barley. In conformity to the fashion I drank this Morning and Yesterday Morning, about a Jill of Cyder. It seems to do me good, by diluting and dissolving the Phlegm or the Bile in the Stomach. The Christian Religion is, above all the Religions that ever prevailed or existed in ancient or modern Times, The...
This is the coldest day We have felt this Winter, and if it were not for the hope I have of a Letter from you Tomorrow, I should freeze for what I know, to night. This Month has been all unpleasant Weather but none severe. You have had a North East storm I perceive which raised the Tides And I hope brought in a fresh and abundant supply of Seaweed.— It is the dullest time We have seen this...
175August 5. 1796. Fryday. (Adams Papers)
A fine day. I have finished Petrarch. Walked up to the new Barn and over to the old Plain. Sullivan and Mr. Sam. Hayward threshing—Billings and Bass carting Earth and Seaweed and liming the Compost. Mr. Wibirt dined with Us. James brought home the twin oxen from Long Island. Trask burning Bushes in the Swamp on Penns Hill.
I have but lately received your kind Letter from Amsterdam of the 17 th of November and another from the Hague much longer and of an earlier date. The last I have Sent to M r Randolph to be laid before the President, as it contains ample and important Information. These are the only Letters I have as yet rec d from you. Your Mother has received others. Your Letters both public and private, I...
I am very much obliged to you for your kind letter by the Earl of Wycombe, a Nobleman who in his short visit to America, has acquired much esteem, and excited no regret but that his residence was no longer. Mr. Hammond too has been publickly received, and will be much respected in his public, and greatly esteemed in his private character. Your letters Sir would have allways given me pleasure;...
I have received and read with great Pleasure your Letter: but having lent it to Col. Humphreys I cannot now answer it so particularly as I wish.—I thank you for it and desire the continuance of your Observations and Speculations in the Same Way. You have quoted a Poet, much to the Purpose: I wish to know whether it is Shakespear, and where it is to be found.—I would not wish you to be...
There is a dead calm in the political Atmosphere, which furnishes no Event worth relating. The House of Reps is wholly taken up with two worthless Agents of Corruption. I have this day however heard News that is of some Importance. It must be kept a Secret wholly to yourself, One of the Ministry told me to day that the President was solemnly determined to serve no longer than the End of his...
I rec d yours of the 14 on Fryday: but had no Letter on Monday. According to present appearances, Jefferson will be Daddy Vice, and between you and me I expect you will soon See a more ample Provision made for him, that he may live in Style—and not be obliged to lodge at Taverns and ride in Stage Coaches. I See plainly enough that when your Washingtons and Adams’s are Stowed away our dear...
I have received with great Pleasure your kind Letter of 28 th. I think M r Sands’s Plan for the Education of his Nephew is judicious. But I Should not advise him to Send him to Europe, So very early. If he remains in America two or three Years, undergoes his Examination and is admitted to the Bar it will be early enough to go to Europe. By your Representation M r Joshua Sands has been your...
Your Letter of the 9 th , gave me great Pleasure as it discovers a curiosity that is laudable and contains a very handsome Relation of political Events and Movements in New York of great Importance to that State and very interesting to the United States. The Writings which have excited your inquisitive disposition, were of Some importance in their day as they had Some Influence on the public...
We arrived here last night in good Season. The Roads were not very bad, and the Weather, tho Showery, was not inconvenient. M r Freeman the Son of our late Neighbours at Milton and a M r Thorp of New York were our Companions in the Stage. M r Freeman is a very agreable Man. I never travelled with any Man more assiduous to make me comfortable. At Church I met my Old Friends Governor Huntington...
The letter you did me the honor to write me, the 15th of June last did not arrive till yesterday. The memory of the time I passed in Holland, and of the esteem I conceived for several meritorious characters, and among others for Mr Mandrillon will I hope never be effaced. The elegant compliments you are pleased to make me, on my election to the dignity of Vice President of the United States of...
This morning I received your favour of the 20 th. The House I am in was aired and Smoked with Tar & Powder and the Vaults Slaked with Lime &c before I came in. I hope with you that Congress will not remain here late in the Spring: but the Extent of Business before Us Seems to be immense. Perhaps the less We do the better. Something however must be done. When Russell Said “there is but one Man...
It was not, till yesterday that I received your kind Letter, with your Discourse on Animation; for both of which obliging favours I pray you to accept of my best Thanks. My incessant Drudgery, for three and thirty Years in the dull fields and forests of Law and Politicks, has rendered it impossible for me to spare much of my time, in disquisitions of natural knowledge. Whenever any Thing of...
The H. of R. have not yet determined— The Question is to be calld up on Monday— But the opposition who now call themselves the virtuous Majority, will endeavour Still to postpone it. It is now avowed by M r Bond, the British Chargé D’affaires that the Surrender of the Posts is suspended upon the determination of the H. of R. and who could expect it would be otherwise? I have read “The...
Permit me in this severe Season, to Salute your fireside, and congratulate you on your return from the Northern Circuit. As the time approaches when We are to expect the Pleasure of Seeing you at the Supream Court in Philadelphia, you will give me leave to Solicit the Honour and the Pleasure of your Company and that of Mrs Jay, and whoever else of the Family who may accompany you, at Bush...
The Senate is to meet at Ten, this morning and I hope will finish: but it is still uncertain. I shall Sett out this Afternoon, provided the senate rises— But I shall not be able to reach New York by tomorrow night— if I am not restrained from riding on sunday I may arrive on that day: But on Sunday or Monday I think, barring accidents, you may expect me. I have been detained so long, the hot...
I must now most Seriously request you to come on to me as soon as conveniently you can. never did I want your assistance more than at present, as my Physician and my Nurse. my disorder of Eight years standing has encreased to such a degree as to be very troublesome and not a little alarming.— I have agreed to take Col Smith and his Family and Furniture into the House with us and they will be...
Yesterday I received your favour of the 19th. and learn with Pleasure your design to persue your valuable History of New Hampshire. The Anecdote of "Positive Proof from Holland that military Stores, to the amount of 400,000 St. were ordered and purchased from N. America", is wholly unknown to me. that Col Lee of Marblehead ever “recd or dispersed” any stores I never heard nor that he was...
Our good Friend General Lincoln gave me this morning your favour of the 7 th which compensated in Part of my Disappointment by Mondays Post. I sett my heart on one Letter a Week and as many more as you please. I cannot say that my desire of Fame increases. It has been Strong in some Parts of my Life but never so strong as my Love of honesty. I never in my Life that I know of sacrificed my...
Last Week I received through M r Izard a kind Invitation to dine with M rs Powell, whom I had not before seen Since her Loss of M r Powell. Yesterday I had the Pleasure of dining with her and her Brother & sister Francis with their Children and M r & M rs Harrison among the rest—M r & M rs Morris & M r Izard— M rs Powell sends many Compliments to you and regrets that she cannot enjoy your...
I have duly received but not duly answered your favor of April 3d.... It is a misfortune that a man can never be spoken to by a projector without being misunderstood or misrepresented I told Mr. Forbisher that if he expected any thing from the general government, he must apply to it by petition. But I never told him, that I had the least suspicion that the general government would ever do...
I had yesterday the Pleasure of receiving your kind Letter of the 10th of this month, and am happy to find that you are pleased with your situation at Bush Hill. I hope soon to hear of the Birth of a peaceable son of Mars, and that Mrs Knox is as well and in as good Spirits as you appear to be. The Paragraphs in the New York Papers I know nothing of: The Lyes in the New Haven one I never heard...
I have received your favour of the thirtieth of June, with a continued Bill of the Treasurers Set of exchange No. 1351 for five hundred Dollars in my favour bearing date the 4th. day of May 1791 and drawn on Benjamin Lincoln Esq Collector of Boston, and I thank you for the trouble you have taken in this Affair.—I shall certainly hold myself bound to indemnify the United States for any Injury...
I have persecuted you, too much with my letters.—I beg you would give yourself no trouble to answer them, but when you are quite at leisure, from more important Business or more agreable amusements. I deny, that there is or ever was in Europe a more free Republic than England, or that any Liberty on Earth ever equalled English liberty, notwithstanding the defects in their Constitution. The...
I hope you will not communicate to any body the hints I give you about our Prospects: but they appear every day worse and worse. House Rent at 2700 dollars a Year 1500 dollars for a Carriage 1000 for one Pair of Horses— All the Glasses ornaments kitchen furniture—the best Chairs settees, Plateaus &c all to purchase—All the China Delph or Wedgwood Glass & Crockery of every sort to purchase—and...
Entre nous M r sheerjashub Bourne called upon me the other Morning to ask me some Questions about M r Blacks farm and Capt n. Beale’s farm. He says both are to be sold— Beale asks ten thousand Dollars for his New House and farm—and the same for Squantm— M r Blacks asks Eighteen thousand but it is Supposed would take fifteen. I hope in mercy Bourn will not buy— Our present Neighbours are I...
I do my self the honour to transmit to you my Accounts which remain unsettled, for the last two years and Eight months of my Administrations abroad in the service of the United States. I have left a Blank for my Salary. In my own opinion it is but Justice that it should be filled up with the Sum of two thousand five hundred Pounds sterling a year, because this was the contract under which I...