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If your state would as you hint in your letter of the 9th all turn tories and go back to Britain openly; I should not be obliged to rack my invention to point out the advantages which would result to the United States. For as this would oblige us to chastise the treachery, insolence and ingratitude of your people, it would be an exemplary vengeance to all others whose hearts are no better than...
The letter you did me the honor to write me, the 15th of June last did not arrive till yesterday. The memory of the time I passed in Holland, and of the esteem I conceived for several meritorious characters, and among others for Mr Mandrillon will I hope never be effaced. The elegant compliments you are pleased to make me, on my election to the dignity of Vice President of the United States of...
Your favours of 19. Decr. 15 Jan. and 7 March are all before me.—I am much obliged to you for the accurate and useful Information, in all of them. It is a mortifying Thing to be obliged to take so much Pains with a Man to prevent him from Setting Fire to his own House, when he knows that he must burn the whole Town with it. I can give you no other Advice my Friend than to persevere, with the...
There is nothing improper in your application of the 23d of Feby nor should I find fault with your seeking honor or emolument. Every man has a right to seek both. Mr Remsen has been many years in the office of foreign affairs and has qualifications and merits which preclude all competition: Mr Alden is another in a similar predicament, so that there is not a possibility of your success in your...
Your favour of March 17. is recd.—The French Revolution will, I hope produce Effects in favour of Liberty Equity and Humanity, as extensive as this whole Globe and as lasting as all time.—But I will candidly own that the Form of Government they have adopted, can, in my humble opinion, be nothing more than a transient Experiment. an Obstinate Adhœrence to it, must involve France in great and...
Your favour of march the 21st. with a letter from Col: Hurd came duly to hand. It is a long time that I have had an agreable acquaintance with that gentleman, and the best opinion of his virtues and talents. He cannot have better advocates than his friends Govr: Langdon and Judge Livermore, for any appointment in New Hampshire or Vermont, if that state should be admitted into the union. How is...
I have this morning received your agreable Letter of the 19. Ult. and am pleased with your prudent deliberation and judicious decision, upon the Place of your future residence. The Promotion of M r Sullivan, will lead him out of Town upon the Circuits and give room to others to take his Place upon occasions. You are not however to expect a run of Business at first. Your Project of boarding...
I am again obliged by your favour of the 14. Ult.—Will you be so good as to tell me whether your Mother was of the Family of Stoddards of Northampton. a Col Stoddard of that Town has left a Splendid Reputation.—I know very little of the Poet J. Adams but have heard that his father was of Newfoundland I think. Hannah Adams the author of a famous Book upon religious Sects which I have never Seen...
Your favor of the 31st of January I received in its season, I have at two or three several times had conversation with General Knox upon the subject of Mr. Martin Brimmer Sohier; and have the General’s promise to give particular attention to Mr. Sohier’s merit and pretensions. As the Secretary at War appeared to be well acquainted with the candidate, and to have the best disposition to serve...
The Tories as you observe in your friendly Letter of 24 Feb. are more attached to each other; they are also, We must candidly confess, more of real Politicians. They make to themselves more merit with the People, for the smallest services, than the Whigs are able to do for the greatest. The Arts the Tr umpetts the Puffs, are their old Instruments and they know how to employ them. The History...
I am much obliged by your favor of March 20th and very apprehensive that this is not the only letter of yours unanswered. To leave your letters unanswered is in me very bad œconomy. The General is arrived here; but has as yet said nothing to me of his business. Doctor Craigie shall have all the aid in my power to give him, in his pursuit of justice in your affair: but I do not at present see...
I have received with pleasure your kind letter of the 17th of March, and should be happy to have an opportunity of serving you both with regard to your services and early attachment to the cause of your country, and from an agreable recollection of your private character and my former person acquaintance with you. But the office I hold is totally detached from the executive authority, and...
I have received and read with great Pleasure your Letter: but having lent it to Col. Humphreys I cannot now answer it so particularly as I wish.—I thank you for it and desire the continuance of your Observations and Speculations in the Same Way. You have quoted a Poet, much to the Purpose: I wish to know whether it is Shakespear, and where it is to be found.—I would not wish you to be...
Charlemain Frederick, Rousseau Otis. Rousseau. have you seem Franklin, Since he passed the River? or has the Boat been too full of Passengers to bring him over? Otis. I know not.—I have very little Curiosity to know. I care nothing have no solicitude for Steel Rods nor Iron Points. I am very glad his Points were not over my head: They might have detained me in the Regions of Mice for twenty or...
Your Letter of April 13, Soars above the visible diurnal sphere.—I own to you that Avarice Ambition the Love of Fame &c are all mysterious Passions. They are the greatest absurdities, Delusions and Follies that can be imagined, if in this Life only We had hope. In the Boat on our Return from Point no Point, the principal Topick of Conversation was Independence —An intercepted Letter early in...
Accept of my best Thanks for your favour of Feb. 1st. and the excellent Discourse that came with it. I love the Zeal and the Spirit which dictated this Discourse, and admire the general Sentiments of it. From the year 1760 to this hour, the whole Scope of my Life has been to support such Principles and propagate such sentiments. No sacrifices of myself or my family. No dangers, no labours,...
I am not willing you should want Information from the Seat of Govt: but I can do little more than Send you a Newspaper. This Day twelve months I first took the Seat in which I now Sett, and I have not been absent one Moment, when the Senate has been Sitting, excepting one Day when my own Salary was under Consideration. This Confinement will injure my health, if I cannot Soon take a Journey. Mr...
Your favour of March 30. and Ap. 17. came to hand last night. By the “attack in Metre” you mean I suppose, that written by Ned. Church, a Cockfighting Cousin and Companion of Charles Jarvis a devoted Instrument of Mr H.—Jarvis’s Mother was a Church.—This Fellow, this Ned Church, I know nothing of—I scarcely ever spoke to him in my Life.—His Traitorous Brother, I knew very well; and the Vendue...
With much pleasure I received your favour of March 26th. It brought fresh to my memory the many hours we spent together in the chamber where I first saw the light of the sun. I believe there are few persons who run through a public career, especially one that interests the passions of the people; without finding persons to recollect prophecies that great things would one day be his lot—The...
I have received your favor of the 13th. as I did that of march in due season—One wishes to be informed of all facts in which the public is interested—but the details of Rhode Island manoeuvres is distressing. The Senate yesterday passed a bill, which cutts off all communication with Rhode Island, if she chooses such a solitary selfish and unsocial system. The bill passed by a great majority...
I have duly received but not duly answered your favor of April 3d.... It is a misfortune that a man can never be spoken to by a projector without being misunderstood or misrepresented I told Mr. Forbisher that if he expected any thing from the general government, he must apply to it by petition. But I never told him, that I had the least suspicion that the general government would ever do...
Your agreable favour of the 24th of April, was brought to me in season and I thank you for it; though my thanks are not in good season.—Your sentiments concerning the assumption of the State debts, the encouragement of American navigation and the establishment of a national bank, are conformable to those of about one half The Continent and contrary to those of the other half. How shall we...
I have received with a mixture of pleasure and gloomy melancholy your favour of the 17th. What motives the eastern members can have to support the silly petition of Franklin and his Quakers, I never could conceive: but it was not that conduct which sowered the minds of the Southern members against an assumption of the State debts. The seat of government is more likely to have had such an...
Catalogue of Books in This Library. Law . Vol: Abridgement of State Trials. by Salmon. 1. fol: Accomplish’d Attorney 1. 8vo: Archerley’s Brittannic Constitution. 1. fol Burlemaqui Nat. Law 1st Vol. Burrows Reports. 3. " Blackstones Commentaries 4. Quto: ——— Appendix 1. 8vo: ——— law tracts 1. . . Barnardiston’s Reports
Nothing mortifies me more than the difficulty I find to maintain that correspondence with you which when I left England I thought would be some consolation to me for the loss of your conversation. We proceed by degrees to introduce a little order into this Country, and my public duties require so much of my time, that I have little left for private friendship, however dear to me. By General...
I take the opportunity by General Mansell to acknowledge the receipt of your polite letter of the 29 of May 1789 and to present you my thanks for the valuable present of your entertaining travels. Your compliments upon so hasty a production as my book are very flattering. It would give me pleasure to pursue the subject through all the known governments, and to correct or rather new make the...
Your obliging Letter of the 29. Ult. was brought to me Yesterday at my house, and as there happened to be a few Friends with me, we joined in Wishing Happiness and Prosperity to Rhode Island with great Cordiality. This morning the President did me the honour of a Visit and I had the Pleasure of congratulating him on this pleasing Event and presenting to him your affectionate Respect. Congress...
I have received your kind letter of March 29th and the packet of pamphlets, and I pray you to accept of my best thanks for both—I sent you lately by Genl. Mansel, some of our rough matters. The boxes of books you sent by Captain Bernard arrived safely, I know.—You seem to suppose our coast in danger from African pyrates; in this I presume you are deceived by the Artifices of the London...
I have received your Favour of July 8, and request you to pay the Account of Messrs Barry Father, Son and Co for the Wine and give your Account of it with the Charges to my Friend Dr Tufts, who will pay you, if he has Assetts in his hands, of mine, if not I will make him a Remittance for the Purpose. I am sir your obliged friend & huml servt. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
I have receive the polite and obliging Letter, you did me the honour to write me, on the seventh of May.—Although an intimate and frequent Correspondence with you, considering the relation between Us, and the agreable Acquaintance, I had with you in France and England would have been always agreable to me; Yet considering the different Countries and Governments in which We live, and the...
I have recd your favour of the 19th. I presume your answer to Mr Jefferson will be sufficient but If you write to the President, it will do us harm——Your letter to the President came to me after your appointment, so that I have never delivered nor mentioned it to any one; and shall keep it and all that came with it till your further orders.—It is best it should not now be conveyed to the...
It is with great pleasure, that, in obedience to an order of the Senate of the United States, I have the honor to enclose their resolution of this date, which was unanimously agreed to; and, in behalf of the Senate, I request that you will be pleased to communicate the same to the corporation of this city, and, at the same time, signify to them, that it is the wish of the Senate that the...
Mr. Ducher, a French gentleman, whom you did me the Honor to introduce to me formerly by letter, and who is well esteemed in this country, will have the honour to deliver you this. The news of the death of my worthy friend Count Sarsefield has afflicted me the more as I have never been able to learn the circumstances of it or of his last sickness, or in what situation he has left his affairs,...
That New Orleans, and the Spanish Posts on the Missisippi, will be among the first attempts of the English, in case of a war with Spain, appears very probable: and that a combined operation from Detroit, would be convenient to that end cannot be doubted. The Consequences, on the western Settlements, on the commerce with the West Indies, and on the general Security and tranquility of the...
That New Orleans, and the Spanish Posts on the Missisippi, will be among the first attempts of the English, in case of a war with Spain, appears very probable: and that a combined operation from Detroit, would be convenient to that end cannot be doubted. The Consequences, on the western Settlements, on the commerce with the West Indies, and on the general Security and tranquility of the...
That New Orleans, and the Spanish Posts on the Missisippi, will be among the first attempts of the English, in case of a war with Spain, appears very probable: and that a combined operation from Detroit, would be convenient to that end cannot be doubted. The Consequences, on the western Settlements, on the commerce with the West Indies, and on the general Security and tranquility of the...
I received with great Pleasure your Letter of the 9 of August, inclosing a Receipt from Mr Parsons for one hundred Pounds lawful Money, which you paid him in the month of August, Second day, in full for your Tuition as a Clerk in his office for the term of three Years. I learned, with Pleasure also, that on the 9 th of August you took Possession of an office in my house, where I wish you more...
Upon my return from Philadelphia to which beloved City I have been, for the purpose of getting an house to put my head in next Winter I had the pleasure of receiving your favour of the Second of this month. The sight of our old Liberty Hall, and of Several of our old Friends, had brought your venerable Idea to my mind, and continued it there, a great part of the last Week, so that a Letter...
Your letter did not rech me, ’till this morning, on my return from Philadelphia. Your application shall be communicated to the Secretary of the Treasury, whose duty it is to examine the pretensions of everyone in the line you are pursuing.—The Candidates will probably be numerous, especially among the surviving Officers of the late Navy; so that I cannot foresee what will be the success of...
Since my return from Philadelphia where I have been to get Lodgings, against the meeting of Congress, your Mamma has shewn me your Letter: and I consent you Should keep the Horse for the present.— My Brother may Supply you with hay, as far as your occasion for it may go. Can nothing be done to make my Estate at Boston and Braintree more productive? The House where you are is at a miserable...
I wrote you before to day: but I forgot to say Several Things.— Have you ever attended a Town Meeting? You may there learn the Ways of Men, and penetrate Several Characters which otherwise You would not know. There are Several Objects of Enquiry, which I would point out to your consideration without making any noise or parade about them. 1. The State of Parties in Religion, Government Manners,...
I received your Letter, before my Departure for Philadelphia, but had not time to answer it. It is not probable that any Special Agents will be employed in the Business you had in contemplation. The Board consists of Men, who will Study Æconomy, in that as well as in all other Affairs committed, to their Charge; and therefore the Loan Officers or Collectors or some other known Character will...
I have received and read with great Pleasure, your modest Sensible, judicious and discreet Letter of the 31. of Sept r. The Town of Boston is at present unhappily divided into political Parties, and neither Party I presume has tried Experiments enough upon you to discover to which Side you belong. You might very easily induce either Side to make much of you, by becoming a zealot for it: but my...
I duely received your obligin letter of the 27th of August; but a journey to Philadelphia, and the confusion of preparations to remove to that City, have prevented an earlier answer to it. I concur very freely and very fully with you, in your sentiments respecting the appointments of Consuls abroad; but I find the President and Secretary of State, are impressed with an apprehension of censure,...
It would give me great Pleasure to comply with your request, and to be of Service to you, in any way in my Power: but I am not at Liberty to communicate the most distant hint to any one, relative to the Subject. One Anecdote which flatters my Pride, if it does not comfort my Conscience, among the many mortifications of my Social Feelings, which I am obliged to Submit to, I will relate to you....
Last night I had the pleasure to receive your obliging letter of the 13 of this month: and thank you for your information of your intention to embarke for Europe. The advice of your friends in France and England, to be as early as possible in the publication of your Grandfathers papers, is probably judicious; as a certain ardor of curiosity wears off in such cases commonly in time. Your friend...
I am thankful to our common friend as well as to you for your favour of the 4th. which I received last night.—My fears are in Unison with yours, that Hay, Wood and Stubble will be the materials of the new political Buildings in Europe, till Men shall be more enlightened and friendly to each other. You agree, that there are undoubtedly Principles of Political Architecture: but instead of...
The Note from Piemont, I would not have Sued by any means. Hopkins’s Pretentions I have no Idea of. I Suppose an account with him may be found in my Ledger, But I can Say nothing upon memory. Piemont ought to make out his Account— He says I had a Bar Wig and a Bob Wig of him. If so he should make out his Account and if they amount to as much as the Note, there is an End of the Business. If...
By Mr. Broom, a worthy citizen of our states, I take the pleasure to inform you, that I have received your kind letter, and have sent the two packets to Dr. Willard and to Harvard college. As these packets have been delayed by their address to me, I beg the favor of you in future to address any favors of the kind, intended for the college, to the care of my son, “John Quincy Adams, counsellor...
Although I am much obliged to you for your kind Letter of the Second, and the News and Observations in it; I am dissappointed in not receiving you as I expected, instead of a Letter. I thought it was Sufficiently explained and understood between Us, that you were to be at Philadelphia on the first monday in December. But as it now appears otherwise I desire you to loose no time in coming on;...