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1Memorandum, 1789 (Adams Papers)
President. Vice-President. Mr. Langdon 1. Mr. Dalton & Lady 2 Mr. Wingate 1. Mr. Strong 1 Mr. Johnson & Lady 2 Mr. Elmer 1 Mr. Elsworth 1 Mr. Patterson 1 Mr. Morris 1
It has been impossible to get time to write you.— Morning, Noon, and Night, has been taken up with Business, or Visits.— Yesterday the President was Sworn, amidst the Acclamations of the People.— But I must refer you to Gazettes & Spectators.— I write this abed.— M r Allen del d. me, Yesterday your Letter.— I like very much your Plan of coming on, with Charles and Thomas, before Commencement....
I have received the letter you did me the honour to write me, on the twenty Seventh of last month, inclosing the Freedom of the City of New Haven, elegantly engrossed on Parchment, and authenticated under the Signature of the Mayor, City Clerk and Seal of the City May I request of you, Sir to present my best respects and most Sincere Thanks to the Mayor, Aldermen and Common Councill and...
I must finally conclude to request of you to come on to New York as soon as possible and bring Charles and Thomas both with you if you can— if they cannot come at present let them follow as soon as they can be permitted.— I design they shall both Spend the Vacation here at least.— I want your Advice about furniture and House. bring Polly Taylor with you.— You had better land on Long Island and...
Your fav r. of 22 Ult. is rec d. — I was well aware that many of my Friends and the Well Wishers to good Gov t , would be prevented from making their Compliments to me, on my Departure, by their alienation from the House from which I Set off: but perhaps their delicacy, upon that occasion, was too great. The Duty of 6 Cents on Mollasses, appears to me to be generally reprobated at present as...
Every Thing has happened, as I could wish Since I left you, excepting the delay of making Provision for my Subsistance; and this has proceeded from an Uncertainty what they ought to do. I am very easy on that Point, as I am determined to live in Proportion to my allowance. I beg leave to mention one Thing, which may be of Some consequence, both to the Public and to me.— If Thomas would...
I have received your kind favour of April 22 d and Shall not be easy till it is answered, though it is not easy to find the time, amidst the Confusion of innumerable Visits, formal Ceremonials, Balls, Commencements, Levees, &c a &c a , blended with the constant more serious Duties of my Situtation.— I agree with you entirely, that among the first dangers to be apprehended is a contest between...
Thank you for your favour of 28. Ult.— There is an entire harmony, between the two Persons you Speak of, and there is no probability of its interruption. The first is modest and the Second at least Shall be unassuming. The Constitution has furnished him with a justification of a cautious conduct, and imposed it on him as a duty. Cæsar would never have been displeased, at a Compliment on his...
I have taken an House, and now wish you to come on, as soon as possible.— It will be necessary to send by Water all the Carpets that are not in Use, and several Beds, Bedsteads, Bedding Bed and Table Linnen,—Plate, China &c if you can convey it to Providence would come better that Way. The House is on the North River about a mile out of the City, in a fine situation, a good Stable, Coach...
I have rec d yours of the 5 th. — If you think it best, leave Thomas at Colledge: but I pray you to come on with Charles, as soon as possible.— as to the Place let my Brother plough and plant if he will, as much as he will. He may Send me, my half of the Butter Cheese &c here.— As to Money to bear your Expences you must if you can borrow of some Friend enough to bring you here. if you cannot...
Inclosed is a Letter of Thanks to our fellow Citizens of New Haven and to M r Edwards, for the most endearing Compliment I ever received. I suppose myself chiefly indebted to your Friendship for the favourable Representation of my Character among your Neighbours which has produced this obliging Result. I hope it will not be long before We shall have an opportunity to renew our former...
I received your friendly Letter last Evening, and thank you for your kind Remembrance, of your Old Friend. To hear of your Success and Prosperity in Business; the Independence of your Circumstances, and the Contentment of your heart, gives me a Pleasure, the more exquisite, as it is so rare.— It is almost the Single Instance, that I have received Since my Return to America. My Correspondence...
The Vice President of the United States has the honour to present his humble Opinion, on the Points proposed, for his consideration. 1. That an Association with all kinds of company, and a total Seclusion from Society, are extreams, which, in the actual Circumstances of this Country, and under our form of Government, may be properly avoided. 2. The System of the President, will gradually...
Your favour of the 19 of March deserves a particular consideration and answer, which I have not, till now, been able, from a multitude of avocations some frivolous yet indispensable, others of more consequence, to give it. The Influence which you Suppose I may have as President of the Senate, will be found to be very little, if any at all. you Say the Eastern States must not be Suspected: but...
The Vice President of the United States has the honour to present his humble opinion, on the Points proposed, for his consideration. 1. That an association with all kinds of company, and a total Seclusion from Society, are extreams, which, in the actual Circumstances of this Country, and under our form of Government, may be properly avoided. 2. The System of the President, will gradually...
I am in such a situation that I cannot see the way clear for you to come on, till some resolution is passed in the House.— You will be as ready as you can, and I will write you the Moment to come on . any Thing is done.— I will resign my office rather than bring you here to be miserable. Yours eternally RC ( Adams Papers ); addressed: “M rs Adams / Braintree.”
I have received your two letters of April 21 and 28 th and am obliged to you for introducing your Brother Oliver Bowen Esq r , to whom I wish success in his pursuits— But the Senators & Representatives from Georgia and other States in its neighbourhood will be most naturally consulted upon his application your Observations upon the high duty upon Molasses, are all very just and have been...
inclosed is a Letter from Capt n. Brown who commands the best Packet between Providence and this Place.— He called very politely and respectfully to offer his service in bringing you to New York.— if you can let him know the time when you can come, he will be ready. I have taken an House: but have nothing to put in it, [no]r to live on.— nothing is yet determined, I never felt so [ir]resolute...
I last night received your friendly letter of March the fifth: and am happy to find that I have a place in your remembrance. There are few portions of my life that I recollect with more entire satisfaction than the hours I spent at Hackney, under your Ministry, and in private society, and conversation with you at other places— The approbation you are pleased to express of my Speculations on...
I have received the letter you did me the honour to write me, on the fifth of this month and thank you for your obliging congratulation on the event of the votes of the Electors. as far as I am personally concerned in this Event it was not a subject of much congratulation: it was rather a mortification to me to see that in our first great Election, so great a portion of our Fellow Citizens had...
I have received your kind letter of April 24 th —recommending Gustavus Scott Esq r for employment in the Law Department— The President is you know in the first Instance the sole Judge of the Persons proper to be nominated to officer When the Nomination is made the Senate have a Negative but the Vice President has no Voice excepting in the case of an equal division of the Senators— There are...
I received with pleasure your friendly letter of the 25 th of April—your recommendation of M r William Pickman has great weight with me. but you must give me leave to enquire whether he has made application to the President: if he has not he should be advised to do it, immediately. There you know the Constitution has wisely placed the Authority of judging in the first instance of the Merits...
I have received your Letter of the 16 th .— I have taken a large and handsome house, in a beautiful Situation, about two miles out of the City, upon the North River. The Rent is less, than I must have given for a much meaner house in Town, without any such accommodations of Stable Garden, Pasture &c I now desire you to come on, as soon as possible, and to Send by Tirrell, or some other Vessel,...
M r Van berckel informs me that you were desirous of seeing the second and third Volumes of the Defence & c When I gave orders for the first to be sent you I expected that the other two would have been sent. I am very glad nevertheless Sir of renewing to you the assurances of my sincre esteem attachment and respect. My regards at the same time if you please to my Friend D r Marclane— My Fellow...
I am, this Evening favoured with yours of the 18. In Answer to your Question, I ask another.— Where is the Sovereignty of the Nation lodged? Is it in the national Government, or in the State Governmen[ts?] Are there more Sovereignties than one? if there is more than one there are Eleven. if there are Eleven there is no general Government—for there cannot be eleven Sovereignties against one.—...
I have received your obliging Letter of the 19 th . a drawback on Rum exported is admitted by the House, and I believe will not be taken off by the Senate. The duty on Molasses will be reduced to 4 Cents and I hope to three. Your Reasoning appears to be very just and I think will prevail. The jealousies Distilleries and Breweries are natural and cannot be wholly prevented: but I hope they will...
I have received your favour of the 18 th. but cannot agree with you that “a considerable Period must elapse before the United States can arise to Greatness.”— They are already arrived at Greatness, and their greatest Misfortune is that they know it not.— The Politicians, if such there are, who think it best We never should be great are already disappointed. They may possibly contribute to keep...
What is there which the new Government possesses, on which to found its Authority.? Has it Honours? has it pleasures? has it profits to bestow, which may Attract the Attention, excite the Love, or alarm the Fear, of Such a Majority in every State as will compell the Minority to Obedience? Has the national Government at this moment, Attractions enough to make a Seat in it, an Object of Desire,...
A little before my departure from Braintree I received your favour inclosing a letter from M rs Walker. last night I received that of the 7 th May There was no necessity of any apology for writing to me after so long a correspondence there has never been on my part any failure of friendship to M r Warren or yourself— you are very much mistaken in your opinion of my situation. I have neither...
Your old Acquaintance M r Harrison of Cadiz will deliver you this, if you should not, as I hope you will, be Sett off for this place before he can reach Braintree.— I expect you, here indeed in a Week or ten days at farthest, from this date. M rs Washington is arrived. My House and Garden want us very much. We Shall be obliged to bring all our Furniture and most of our Books, except the Law...