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    • Adams, John
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    • Adams, Thomas Boylston
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    • Washington Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Recipient="Adams, Thomas Boylston" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
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I once more wish you a prosperous Voyage an honourable Conduct and a happy Life. Remember your Characters as Men of Business as well as Men of Virtue, and always depend on the Affection and Friendship of your Father RC ( Adams Papers ); addressed: “My Sons”; internal address: “John Quincy and Thomas Boylston Adams”; endorsed by JQA : “My Father 14. Sept r: 1794. / Rec d: at Boston.” Tr ( Adams...
You have lost the Opportunity of sharing in the Glory of some of your Friends in this City, who have been out and returned, from the Campain against the Insurrection in the four Western Counties of Pensilvania. Your Friend Climer lost his Life, and is greatly lamented. ’Squire Cranch as his Father calls him was here Yesterday with M r Greenleaf, whose Agent as well as Lawyer he is to be at the...
It is a long time Since I have rec d any Letter from you, and the Report that you have had a Return of your Rheumatism has allarmed me— We heard that you were better but should be glad to know the Particulars. I am once more happy at home, and my Farm, by the help of a fine rainy season shines very bright.— I Should be glad to be informed, of your Plans and Views— Whether You mean to return or...
Your Letter of the 19 of October from London gave me great Joy and all your other Friends of whom you have many much Pleasure— And I was again highly delighted to hear from M r Jay that he had Letters from your Brother at Amsterdam the 20 th of Nov r. M r Wilcocks who is kind enough to take Charge of this Letter is probably an Acquaintance of your s : You must take him with you in your Daily...
I last Week at Philadelphia rec d your kind Letter of April by Capt n Boadge, and it has been a delicious Morcell to me and to several other of your Friends. As you are in the best Country of Europe for the study of the civil Law, I hope you will embrace the Opportunity of making yourself acquainted with all the best Writers on that divine Science, as my Master Gridley used to call it. The...
Your kind Letters of Nov. 2. and Dec r 20 are before me. You will Soon learn the meaning of the Word Ennui, among others in the French Language, which have no parallel Expression in English. I Suffered more from this Dæmon in Europe than I can express; more for what I know than from all the other Pains of my whole Life. had I not found in Books a relief from it, I should have perished under...
I am extreamly sorry to hear that you have been ill of your old Complaint: but was somewhat consoled at the same time by hearing you were better. Exercise of Walking or riding will be your Life in Holland. Our Affairs are assuming a face of good Humour which is very pleasant after so long a storm. We shall have Peace and good Gov t for some Years I hope— I long to learn your Intentions about...
I have this morning received your manly letter of 25 th Ult.— I had long intended to write you but as you observe avocations have always intervened. Public business my son, must always be done by somebody.— it will be done by somebody or other— If wise men decline it others will not: if honest men refuse it, others will not. A young man should well weigh his plans. Integrity should be...
M r Hindman of Maryland has requested a Letter from me, for M r Richard Cook of Anapolis, who will tell you our News. I have read your public Dispatches with great Pleasure. I find your Situation has led you to an Attentive Observation of the Events of the War and the Maneuvres of Politicks and your curious felicity of Expression enables you to represent both to great Advantage. Your Mother...
It was no longer ago than Yesterday that I received your kind Letter of the 14. of December last, which arrived, after a long Passage, I Suppose, at Baltimore, and came from thence by the Post which carried them to Cape Cod and then returned them to Quincy. We have been anxious on your Account as We had rec d no Letter except your Letter of Introduction to M r De Persyn, and We heard you had...
It is a long time Since I have rec d a Letter from you and it is too long Since I have written to you. I have read your Dispatches as Chargé d’affaires at the Hague with much Satisfaction: But I find the Secretary of the Treasury is anxious to hear from You on the subject of Affairs in Holland which have more immediate Relation to his Office. The House of Representatives of U.S. are engaged in...