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Documents filtered by: Period="Revolutionary War"
Results 7051-7080 of 48,367 sorted by author
ALS : American Philosophical Society Ma belle Soeur doit bien regretter dans ce moment-cy de n’avoir pas fait inoculer ses enfants, car ils ont la petite Vérole et comme cette maladie s’est déclarée à sa maison de Montmartre, Elle est privée de l’honneur de vous y recevoir Lundi 13 Jour que vous avés bien voulu donner à mon frere. Je vous demanderai la permission de vous la présenter un jour,...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Comme Je conçois tout le prix de Votre tems, J’ai l’honneur de vous prévenir qu’il suffira que vous veuilliés bien vous rendre, demain vendredi, ches Mons. du Bourg, entre midi et une heure, au lieu de 11 heures, comme nous en Etions convenus; l’acte qui a lieu ce jour là n’étant pas assés Intéressant, pour que vous l’honoriés d’un bout à l’autre de votre...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Dans le compte que J’ai rendu (Journal de Paris) de l’acte soutenu au college Mazarin, J’ai cru devoir parler de ce qui vous est relatif, après avoir pris l’attache de M. Barbeu du Bourg. Je me suis appercu de l’Insuffisance des Expressions pour rendre les sentiments de respect et d’admiration que votre présence inspire, sentiments que personne n’éprouve...
The establishing a continental Army at the beginning of the american War was found impracticable—Those Reasons which induced Congress to object to such establishment at that time, I imagine, still appear equally powerful, if not strengthened by many circumstances that have since happened—But if Congress was now convinced that the Establishment was a bad one; so great a change, as is proposed,...
Letter not found: from Col. John Cadwalader, 24 Dec. 1776. GW wrote in his first letter to Cadwalader of 25 Dec. : “I have yours of Yesterday.”
AL (incomplete draft): Historical Society of Pennsylvania I am at a Loss to determine whether your absence is an injury or an advantage to your Country. Your Services abroad are essential to our Success, and I wish you to remain there till those grand points now in agitation are carried. I am well convinced that interest and not the love of country, rules mankind in general. Your reflections...
whether the army under your Excellency’s command should continue in the field this winter; and whether it is expedient to call to your assistance a great body of militia to make an attack on the City, are very important Questions—the determination of which may decide the fate of America—They therefore require our most serious consideration. It is certainly usual with all nations, in every cold...
I hope you will do me the Justice to beleive that nothing has occasioned so long a silence but a desire of saving you the trouble of reading Letters which do not relate to Business. We had information, in Maryland six or eight weeks ago, that the whole french fleet & army were arrived at Rhode Island—I immediatly set off with my family for Philada; where I was informed that only one division...
I recd your Letter of the 28th last, in consequence of which I have taken the Command of the Militia on this Shore—If the Gentlemen arrive here to take the Command, agreeable to the resolution of Congress, I shall pay you a Visit at Head Quarters—The want of arms in these upper Counties dispirits the Inhabitants very much—Every thing has been done to collect the Companies, but from their...
The River was so full of Ice that it was impossible to pass above Bristol, where I intend[ed]—and therefore concluded to make an attempt at Dunks’s Ferry—as soon as it was dark I sent down all the Boats I could muster, & mar[c]hed down about 8 O’Clock—I embarked a few men to line the River & prevent any person escaping to give Intelligence to the Enemy; and these were followed by a part of the...
A very intelligent young Gentleman is returned, just now, from Prince Town—he left this yesterday Morng & got in about 12 or 1 O’Clock—He would have returned last Night but General Lesley, who commands, & Col: Abercombie would not suffer him to go off —He made his Escape this Morng early, & informs, that from the best Information he could get, there were about 5000 men—consisting of Hessians &...
The honorable Command given me, lately, by Congress, would have been very agreeable, if I had not conceived the war to be near the close —You may remember, in the last Conversation I had with your Excellency, I gave my reasons, fully, for declining any command in the Army. It is no small mortification to me, that by not entering early into the Service, I lost the opportunity of shareing the...
As I did not hear from you this Morning, & being prepared to embark, I concluded you was still on this Side & therefore embarked & landed about 1500 men, about two miles above Bristol—After a considerable number were landed I had information, from the Paymaster of Col: Hichcocks Brigade, that you had crossed over from Trenton—This defeated the Scheme of joining your Army—We were much...
We arrived here about 1 o’Clock—the advanced party about ten —I have sent Horse-men to reconnoitre & from every Information the Enemy left Allen Town about 8 o’Clock this Morng—If I had been happy enough to have cross’d at Dunks’s Ferry we should have compleatly destroyed the Army in this Quarter—I am informed that the Hessians went off in the utmost confusion—I am sorry some of the Troops...
When I consider the Strength & Situation of the Enemy at Philadelphia (from the Representation made by your Excellency) I cannot think that any Enterprize can be undertaken with the least prospect of Success—The distance this Army is from the City puts it out of our power to effect a Surprize—they would certainly have notice of our approach—the Troops they have in the City are, no doubt,...
As the Enemy have made very considerable Detachments from their main Body to New Jersey under the Command of Lord Cornwallis; and a considerable number of men being necessary to defend the several Posts on the Islands which are at least 7 miles from the Lines it may be very proper to consider whether a successfull attack cannot be made on the City. The following plan of an attack is offered...
As General Reed’s Remarks on a late publication relating to a Conversation I had with him at Bristol in the year 1776, require an answer; I shall be much obliged if you will endeavour to recollect whether I did not at some period of the war mention the said Conversation to you, in confidence & beg you will be particular with respect to time, place, & any other Circumstances which you may...
I was on the western Shore when your Favor by Capt: Lee reached my House; & as I was daily expected home, Gen: Dickinson did not forward it; by which means I cannot have the pleasure of seeing you so soon as I could wish. I always proposed spending the active part of the Campaign in Camp, but I did not conceive the Enemy could possibly take the Field till towards the 1st of June (owing to the...
I should have troubled you with a few Lines if any thing had occurr’d to me that might, in the least, tend to promote the Service—You receive such a multitude of Letters, that I can hardly think myself excused in taking up so much of your time as to thank you for the Civilities I received from you at Camp. I shall be happy to hear that you have passed the winter undisturbed & that you have...
I recd your Dispatches to day & have sent Capt: Alexanders Company to Philada. Mr Symes (Lt in R. H. Emigrants who now acts as Asst A. De Camp to General How) came over from Burlington this Morning with a Number of Officers & privates to be exchanged—he says that General Lee was taken by Surprize last Friday Afternoon by about 30 Light Horse. Capt: Murray one of the Prisoners, informs me that...
As Capt: Fitzhugh goes immediatly to Head Quarters, I cannot omit so good an opportunity of acknowledging the receipt of your Letter dated about three months since, & thanking you for the sentiments of esteem you so warmly express towards me. It is unnecessary to repeat the information relating to the movements of the Enemy in Virginia; as you must be acquainted with every particular in an...
We are now perfectly prepared, & would cross immediately, but the Troops lost their Rest last Night—We have determined to pass over to the Neck of Land a little above Bristol at six in the Morning, proceed to Bussel Town, the Square, & from thence to Bordenton—I imagine, if a part of your Army was to take possession of the other side of Crosswix Bridge, which is a pass easily defended, and the...
Having seen Coll Fitzgerald in Town some Weeks since, he promised to do me the Favor to forward my Letter to Genl Prescot to which I cannot as yet expect an Answer if he is not in New york or Jersey. If he should not have left Rhode Island and an Answer should not arrive in a reasonable Time I shall be glad to be inform’d whether your Excellency will do me the Favor to send in an Officer of...
A few Days since I recd your Excellency’s Letter, in Maryld, dated white Plains, inclosing one from the Commissioners of Arrangement respecting my not performing the Duties incident to my Station, and desiring I may be orderd to my Regiment, without being previously exchang’d; and that in Case of Refusal there would be a Vacancy to which an active Officer might be entitled to succeed. The...
ALS : American Philosophical Society J’ai demendé a Monsieur votre fils, les Noms surnoms et qualités du Genéral Mongomery, le lieu et la Datte de sa naissance, en quel tems il a passé à Boston les grades par lesquels il a passé et les plus belles actions de sa vie, comment il à attaqué Quebec en quel lieu il à été tué, et les dattes surtouts de sa mort, et son âge et ces armes. Cela me sera...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Je vien D’aprendre par Des vois indirect que Les Etats unis de L’amerique etoient dans Lintentions de faire Elevé une Statue a La Gloire Du Roy, Si La chose est vraie, il Sauroit tres flateure pour moi D’Etres chargé de L’execution de Se monument. Je vous prie Monsieur Dans cette occasion et Dans touts autre de vouloire bien vous Resouvenire de moy et...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Je vien D’aprendre par les papiés Public que Le Congrés De Philadelphie en reconnoissance des services rendu par Le feu comte Pulawski Brigadier General, a résolu qu’un monument public Seroit élevé à La memoire de cet officier et que L’execution en Seroit Confiée a un artiste francois. D’apres cet article je prens La liberté de vous Ecrie pour vous prïér de...
ALS : American Philosophical Society L’europe entiere a Les yeux sur L’epoque à jamais memorable de La liberté de l’amerique, votre patrie Scait apprecier L’etendue de vos Lumieres, et combien vous ave contribué a La Rendre L’egale Des Roys—peutetre S’empressera t’elle de Transmettre a La Posterité Cette Epoque qui L’immortalise, par un Monument qui en atteste La Gloire, ou Rendre a vos...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Jay lhonneur de vous faire remettre plusieurs Epreuve de Tombeau que vous mave demender, je profite de cette occasions pour vous offrier La Statue de Pierre Corneille qui est une fidelé copie de celle que jay executer en marbre pour Le Roy de qui a merité les applaudissement du Public, jose vous Supliér de vouloire bien L’accepter Comme un hommage que je...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Unne Maladie et Le mauvais temps m’ont empeches D’avoir Lhonneur D’aller vous assurer de mes tres humbles Civivilités et de vous prier de vouloir bien vous resouvenir de moi dans Les occasions ou vous series charge de La part de La republique ameriquaine de quelque morçeau de Sculpture soit tombeaux ou Statue en marbre ou en Bronze, vous aves eû La Bonté de...