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Documents filtered by: Period="Revolutionary War"
Results 6901-6930 of 48,243 sorted by date (ascending)
In consequence of advices, received by Congress of the preparations making by General Carleton to pass the lake and attack Ticonderoga, before our force is drawn together at that post, they have come to the following resolution, which I transmit to you by their direction. “Resolved, That General Washington be directed to write to the Eastern States, from whence the troops to be employed at...
I received your Favor of the 30th Ultimo; and am obliged to You for the Trouble You have taken, in transmitting the Resolves of Congress, and in explaining the Reason on which they are founded. These appear to me solid & judicious; & I shall take immediate Measures, so far as depends upon me, to have the Resolutions carried into Execution with Dispatch, with such Improvements as shall seem to...
As Mrs Washington never receiv’d the Jallop and Calomel you promised her—As the Small Pox, by my last advices from home, has got into my Family—and I suppose not less than three hundred Persons to take the disorder, I must beg you to furnish the bearer with so much of the above Articles for my use as you shall judge necessary; & it will exceedingly oblige Dr Sir Yr Most Obedt & Affecte Servt...
Your favour of 24th of April I received Yesterday, with the arrangements &ca inclosed. It is with concern I understand, that the recruiting Service has been so materially injured by the ineffectual Measures fallen upon by your Legislature and the removal and resignation of Officers. Until the Regiments, or at least a Majority of them join us, it will not be in my power to fix the Rank referred...
Inclosed with this you have an Evening Post, containing some of the tender Mercies of the Barbarians to their Prisoners. If there is a Man, Woman or Child in America, who can read these Depositions, without Resentment, and Horror, that Person has no soul or a very wicked one. Their Treatment of Prisoners, last Year added to an Act of Parliament, which they have made to enable them to send...
6906General Orders, 4 May 1777 (Washington Papers)
Varick transcript , DLC:GW .
Letter not found: from Capt. Caleb Gibbs, 4 May 1777. Gibbs docketed GW’s letter to him of 1 May in part: “Answerd. 4 May.”
The Attention of the Enemy appears of late to be much turned upon this State, We have for some time been repeatedly advised of it, & now realize it, a few days since They landed at Fairfield to the number of near three thousand it is said, under Genl Erskine & made a forced march to Danbury about twenty two miles & there burnt & destroyed 1700 barrels of Pork, 50 Do Beef, 700 bushels of wheat,...
I had the honour of your favour of the 15th of March last, and feel myself greatly Obliged by the kind reception you were pleased to give my last disturbance, The Countenance you then gave me, the polite manner in which you have Encouraged me to An Undertaking of the same kind, & the hopes I have of doing some service to the Common Cause have Emboldened me again to Interrupt your Excellency,...
We have no late Arrivals no foreign Intelligance. The Affair of Danbury has wholly Engrossed the Conversation here for a week past, and we were never able to determine whether what we heard was true or false, or even that there had been an Expedition there till Yesterday, when we were beyond a doubt Ascer­ tained of the loss of the Stores there, and the Indelible Stigma fixed on the N. England...
ALS : American Philosophical Society An express is going to Nantes at twelve o Clock this Day. I pray to see you previous, to determine on what sum shall be paid Capt. Bell, who is about to leave Nantes, and go into the service of the Gentlemen who are sending to him express. And he will be uneasy to have it determined upon. I am Sir your most Obedient and Very Humble Servant Addressed: To /...
6912General Orders, 5 May 1777 (Washington Papers)
His Excellency the Commander in Chief directs, that the strictest attention, and obedience, be paid throughout the Army, to the following resolutions of the Hon’ble the Continental Congress—viz. Resolved. That there be one Physician and Surgeon General, for each seperate Army, who shall be subject to the controul of the Director General, and Deputy Director General, of the District wherein he...
I am favoured with yours of the 1st instant by Capt: Lush, with Copies of the proceedings of the Courts Martial upon the case of Capt: Martin and those of Several persons accused of treasonable practices. As the proceedings against the latter, can be only sent for my opinion, I having no right to interfere in the matter, I would recommend the execution only of the most notorious, and such,...
I was this morning honored with your Letter of the 2d Instt, covering One for Mr Boudinot, which shall be delivered him. I wish the Bills transmitted to him, had been for a larger Sum, and I trust, in a few days they will be followed by Others or a Supply of Money. Mr Boudinots address, is, Commissary Genl of prisoners, in the Army of the United States of America. I have the Honor to be with...
I was this morning honored with your letter of the 3d Inst., with its inclosures. General Arnolds promotion gives me much pleasure; he has certainly discoverd in every instance where he has had an opportunity, much bravery, activity and enterprise; But what will be done about his Rank? he will not act most probably under those he commanded but a few weeks ago. I trust the appointment of Mr...
This will be handed to you by Capt. Mullen (accompanied by Monsr Du Bouchet Brother in law to Col. Conway) who came from France in the Ship Amphitrite—He appears to be a very good Officer, & I think would make a most excellent Major of Brigade, if your Excellency should think it proper. The Assembly of this State have Resolved to complete their 15 Battalions by Draught, which is to be made on...
I am honored with your favors of the 1st 3d, and that to General Clinton and me, inclosing resolves of Congress. Colonel Huntington of the first instant, and the News Paper inclosed, will give the best intelligence I am po[sse]ssed of, relative to our respective losses at Danbury. As to the Stores it is extreamly difficult to obtain a state of their loss. I have not been able to get a return...
Immediately after receiving your Favour of March 17th, I confer’d with General Howe, on the Subject—He will give you, at large, the Reasons why it does not seem proper, to attempt the Reduction of St Augustine, with what Forces may be spared from Georgia & this State. Had it appeared practicable, & expedient, you may be assured, that I would, most chearfully, have afforded all the Assistance...
Tis ten days I believe since I wrote you a Line, yet not ten minuts passes without thinking of you. Tis four Months wanting 3 days since we parted, every day of the time I have mournd the absence of my Friend, and felt a vacancy in my Heart which nothing, nothing can supply. In vain the Spring Blooms or the Birds sing, their Musick has not its formour melody, nor the Spring its usual...
1700 Barrells Pork 50 Do: Beef 700 Basketts Wheat 7 Hhds. Rum 6 Do: Bread 11 Tierces Claret 3 Quarter Cask Wine 12 or 1700 Wheat—Rye & Corn 12 Coile Rope 10 Waggons 1600 Tents mostly old The above is a true State of our Loss, in the affair at Danbury. 20 Men killed. 5 Missing. 17 Houses burnt. A Party that went out to bury the Dead have returned, and Report, that they have buried 62 Regulars....
We have no News here but what comes from you—except that all is well and quiet at Ticonderoga, that We have four Thousand Troops there, and that they were not afraid of Carlton. The Connecticutt People have given Sir Wm. Erskine a Concord and Lexington Drubbing. But I am very angry at our People for mak­ ing a Magazine, so near the Water and among such a Gang of high Church Tories. The Loss...
The only Reason why I omitted to write you when I wrote to your Brothers, was because I thought you was as yet too young to be able to read Writing, not because I had less Affection for you than for them: for you may rely upon it, you have as great a share in your Fathers Esteem and Affection as any of his Children. I hope you will be good and learn to read and write well, and then I shall...
I had the Favour of your Letter of 23d Ultimo by this days Post. As to the Petitions you mention, the Congress have made good no Losses , to any Soldiers—nor any Accounts for Sickness, more than Pay, Rations, and Mileage. I am much obliged to you, for your Account of the Several Acts passed by the Assembly. It is very necessary that We should know here, the Proceedings of our Assembly. We...
I had a few days ago the Pleasure of receiving your Favour of the 16. Ultimo. The Subject of Finances, is the most important, of any that can come under our Consideration. If We can Support those We can, carry on the War with Vigour and probably with success. But if We go on, as We have We must suffer, extream Distress. The science of a Financier is to be learned only from Books or from...
About Ten Days ago, I had the Boldness to make a Motion that a Navy Board Should be established at Boston —certain Gentlemen looked, Struck and Surprized—however it passed. I have moved, I believe fifteen Times, that a Nomination should take Place. Certain Gentlemen looked cold. Two or three Days ago, the Nomination came on. Langdon, Vernon, Deshon, Dalton, Orne, Henley, Smith, Cushing, and...
The bearer of this is Mr. Malmedi a french Gentleman of learning, abilities and experience. I believe he thinks himself intitled to preferment and comes to Congress for that purpose. At the recommendation of General Lee he was made Brigadier General by the State of Rhode Island, and filled the station to the satisfaction of his employers, as appears by a letter from Governor Cook, speaking of...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Mon. thomas morris viens de me communicquer la lettre qu’il viens de recevoir signé de Mrs. Francklin, Diane, et Lée, ma surprisse feus grande lorsque j’en eus fais lecture. Il faut Messieurs que l’on vous aye bien male informmé de moy et mes commettans pour que tout a cou, sans nous en prevenir vous fassiéz retirer des affaires des mains de Mr. S. Sollier...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Franklin, within weeks of his arrival in Paris, began to receive letters from strangers about service in America. The writers were sometimes putting forward friends or relatives, more often themselves; if they specified what they wanted, which many did not, it might be a military commission in advance, or passage money, or merely a letter of recommendation,...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Nessessaty obliges me to trouble you to forward the Inclos’d letter, as I have the Misfortune to be detain’d a Prisner in Newgate, and not Knowing when I shall obtain my Liberty. Therefore am under the Nessessaty of Writing to my Pardner in Savannah in Georgea, to make me a small Remitance, by way of France, and have taken the Liberty to request him to...
6930General Orders, 6 May 1777 (Washington Papers)
The commanding Officers of Battalions, that furnish the Commander in Chief’s Guard, are not [to] draw for the men thus furnished after they have left their respective Battalions, but are to give each man a Certificate of the day on which he was last paid; in order that the Captain of the Guard may be enabled to make out their Abstract properly. Varick transcript , DLC:GW .