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As His Excellency is very busy in preparing matters to lay before the Committee of Congress and Board of War, he commands me to acknowledge your Lordships favor of this day, inclosing a very melancholy letter from Colo. Spencer. The want of cloathing is a thing which is much to be regretted but not remedied just at this time. A considerable quantity upon public account ought to have been here...
I have desired Genl Gates to give you immediate information of the arrival of the Enemy’s Fleet in Delaware, upon which you are to move down to Philada with all the Troops at Trenton. My former directions were to wait orders of march from me, but you are now to attend to those of Genl Gates. Be pleased to communicate this to the Officers commanding the different Corps and desire them always to...
A report is currt here wch gives me much pain. it is, that in consequence of some Orders of your Lordship, or dispute with the Militia, five or Six hundred of them have gone home in disgust—turn’d others back which were coming on and spread universal uneasiness and dissatisfaction as they travel’d. I hope the report is without foundation; unhappy will it be for us if it is not, when we stand...
Since my Last to you of the 19th instant, I had the pleasure to receive your favor of the 15th it gives me vast Satisfaction to find you are makeing Such preparations as will prevent the enemy from makeing any Lodgment there the reinforcement gon to you from this Camp will put you on So respectable a footing; that I have no doubt, but you will be able to Strengthen your works, in Such a manner...
I just now received your Lordships letter requesting absence for one week —to this I shall not object, but beg leave to remind you that the present situation of affairs renders the presence of every Officer necessary—& that I wish you if possible to be back by the time mentioned—I wish you a pleasant journey & am &c. P.s. Yr letter of the 3d mentions the nomination of some Gentlemen to fill...
I am favd with yours by Major Howell. I would have forwarded your Baggage immediately to you, but I think the chance of your returning is at least equal to your staying where you now are. The greatest part of the fleet have fallen down from the narrows towards the Hook, but whether they have gone out to sea we cannot discover. If they should have gone out, and have stood to the Southward, you...
I inclose you a Memorial from Mr Drew and request that you will direct a Board of Field Officers in the Virginia line to sit to morrow and enquire into the facts stated by him & to report their Opinions of the Arrangement that should be made of the Captains & Other inferior Officers in the three incorporated Regiments of Gist— Grayson & Thruston. I would wish it to be a full Board. Your...
Some circumstances having made it necessary to station Major Lee’s corps at Monmouth, your Lordship will have his post at Paramus occupied by Lt Col. Washington—Inclosed is a letter directing him to take your orders on this occasion. I am my Lord Your Lordships Df , in James McHenry’s writing, DLC:GW ; Varick transcript , DLC:GW . A purported LS was offered for sale by American Art...
You will be pleased to assemble the Brigadiers and commanding Officers of Brigades, to take into consideration the inclosed Letter from Mr Blaine and determine on the most effectu⟨al⟩ Remedy for the evil which he complains of —While you are together there is another matter of importance which I would have you employ your thoughts upon—from the present facility of procuring passes to cross the...
I desire that you and the General Officers upon the Court Martial would meet here at five OClock this Afternoon, when the other General Officers will be assembled, to consider of some measures that respect the Army at large. I would submit it to the Court, whether it would not be more convenient to adjourn to the plains, where the Witnesses may be attending their respective duties, and be at...
Your Lordships Letter of yesterday arrived late last night —with respect to the proposed Attack upon the detached body of the Enemy, it appears from Major Clarks account of their Situation whom I sent for to consult upon the Subject—that they can be so easily and readily reinforced from the main body as to render any attempt upon them abortive —The business of your inclosed Letter has been in...
I have to acknowlege the favor of your Lordships two letters of the 13th and 15th inst. Mr Erskine will receive his orders to-day, to mark out the road, which it has been proposed should be opened, and to make you the proper communication —when you will be pleased to enter upon the necessary measures to have it completed. I am & Df , in James McHenry’s writing, DLC:GW ; Varick transcript ,...
I have your favr of the 27th —Supposing the Continental Cloathing delivered to the Virginia line last Fall to be of equal quality with that delivered to the other part of the Army, they ought now to be in better condition than any other troops, as they had at the same time contrary to my judgment and express desire, a very considerable quantity of State Cloathing in addition to the...
I have recd your Lordships favs. of the 6th 7th 8th and 9th instants and thank you for the intelligence communicated in them. I had no material directions to give or I should have answered them immediately upon their Receipt. As your Lordships force is so very unequal to that of the Enemy, I would not wish you to remain so near them as to intice them to aim a blow at you. Keeping their...
I was this morning favoured with yours of the 26th. I am surprized to hear Colo. Morgans Corps was at Heckensack when you mention. I should suppose your information premature, having sent Orders to him to march the moment I had intelligence of the Fleet’s sailing and having written to him since. Your going to Baskenridge must depend on the information you receive from Colo. Dayton respecting...
Colo. Bland is in want of a party of Light Horse to assist him in the Escort of the Convention Troops, be pleased therefore to order a Subaltern and 16 from Moylans Regt to proceed immediately to Sherrards ferry upon Delaware. Should Colo. Bland have passed the Officer is to follow upon the Route of the troops untill he overtakes him. Should he on the contrary not have arrived there, he is to...
Having received undoubted Intelligence of the fitting out of a Fleet at Boston, & of the embarkation of Troops from thence, which from the Season of the year and other circumstances must be destined for some Expedition, South of this; And having such Information as I can rely on, that the Inhabitants of Long Island or a great part of them, are inimical to the rights & liberties of America, &...
You are tomorrow morning at the hour appointed for marching; with the second Line, to take the route by Doctor Daytons at North Castle—Elijah Hunters at Bedford—second Bridge over Croton River—Lt Samuel Haits—Capt. Browns —and Wilsons Tavern to Fredericksburg—if any better road can be pointed out, that will not be liable to the objection of interfering with the Columns commanded by Generals De...
I have received your Letter of yesterdays date. I had no particular person in view when I issued the order respecting the slow progress of the works, at the same time, I acknowledge, that I am exceedingly mortified at seeing, & beholding the delay of them—whether unavoidable, or not, I do not undertake to determine. Colos. Brealey & Barber informs me that the Officers of their Regiments are...
Yours reached me so late last Night that it was impossible to send off the provision before this Morning, and I hope th[at] Genl Maxwell will not be obliged to return for want of it. Had the day been good, the whole Army would have moved down towards Metutchin disencumbered of Tents or Baggage, and would then have acted as Circumstances would have permitted, the Moment the weather is such that...
I have read the orders wch you had framed for your division —they are certainly good, but in substance except in a very few instans. are very explicitly enjoined by the regulations; & have been reiterated at different periods in the general orders antecedent to the promulgation of the established “regulations for the order & discipline of the Troops”; & since, in many particular ones by a...
I shall be much obliged by your informing me of the date of Colo. Smith’s resignation of the 2d State Virginia Regmt. Colo. Brent & Lt Col. Dabney can probably ascertain it. The promotion of the former was in consequence of it—& I wish to know whether he has received a Commission. I also must request your Lordship to inform me of the Christian name of Major Meriwether. The reasons of my...
I have to acknowledge your favors of the 31st Ulto the 1st 3d & 4th Inst. with their several inclosures. As your Lordship observes, the intelligence from the City must now become more important, since the sailing of so large an Embarkation of Troops—and will serve to determine in a great measure whether a complete evacuation of the place is intended. I need not pray your attention, and am, My...
You will proceed forthwith into the State of New Jersey and take the command of the Troops there. These will consist of two continental Brigades under Brigadier Generals Maxwell and Woodford, and such of the Militia of the State as shall be collected on the occasion. General Maxwell has been directed to move and take post on the heights west of Acquaquenunk Bridge—General Woodford is to...
I have been favd with yours of the 30th Sepr and 1st instant from Kakeate. You will make such a disposition of the troops as shall seem to you most eligible for your own security and for checking the excursions of the enemy. The inclosed for General Maxwell directs him to obey your orders. You will therefore draw up such part of his Brigade as you shall think proper. He and all the people...
In addition to the questions which I have already proposed for the consideration of the General Officers —I have farther asked whether judging from the present state and appearance of affairs, it would be advisable to detach any part of our force to Boston—& shd it be decided in the affirmative—what force would it be proper to detach—Your Lordship will be so good as to add your opinion on...
I have had in contemplation an attempt to surprise the enemys post at Powlus Hook and have employed Major Lee to make the necessary previous inquiries. He will inform you of what has passed between us—The number first proposed for the enterprise was 600, but these appeared to me too many to hazard for an object of inferior importance. But by the inclosed letter of the 11th Major Lee proposes...
For some time past my intelligence from the enemy pointed to a considerable movement. By My last accounts from General McDougall of the 30th May, the enemy had advanced from Kings Bridge in force, and was then near the White plains. It is not easy to fix a just opinion of his object. We however know what points we should secure. On last Saturday the Pennsylvania troops marched on the route to...
I this minute received Your Lordships favor of the 29th Ulto; that of the 24th came to hand on Wednesday night. If a stroke can be effected against the Enemy on Staten Island with success, it is much to be desired—and if the situation of the Bay of New York is such as to prevent support coming from the City or Long Island; and the passage from Jersey on account of the ice should be safe for...
I inclose you the extract of a letter from Governor Livingston to Congress, which they have referred to me. I think it not impossible, some instances of a commerce between the inhabitants and the enemy may have been tolerated for the purpose of gaining intelligence, and that this may have given rise to the whole suspicion. But lest there should be any thing more serious in it, that may require...
Your letter of yesterday inclosing a plan of operations for the ensuing campaign came to my hands this Morning—Communications of this kind are always pleasing to me, because it is my earnest wish to avail myself of every useful hint, and to have my own opinions strengthned by the concurrance of others—but where circumstances are either not well known, or not duly ballanced, a plan may appear...
By advices which I have just received from Congress, I have no doubt of the French fleet (under Count D’Estaing) coming this way—and that it will appear in these Seas immediately —The prospect of preventing the retreat of the garrisons at Stony—and Verplanks point ⟨(⟩so far as it [is] to be effected by a Land operation) again revives upon probable ground, and I am to request, that your...
I have to request your Lordship to order the boats from new-Ark to their former stations as I do not apprehend them altogther safe where they now are. I am, your Lordship’s ⟨ illegible ⟩ Df , in James McHenry’s writing, DLC:GW ; Varick transcript , DLC:GW . These were the boats which GW had ordered Maj. Henry Lee to gather at Newark, N.J., to support the assault on the British fort at Paulus...
Lest the Enemy should in some degree avail themselves of the Knowledge (for I do not doubt but that they are well informed of every thing we do) I did not care to be so particular in the General orders of this day, as I mean to be in this Letter to You. As mutch Tim⟨e⟩ then would be lost (in Case the Enemy should a⟨ttem⟩pt crossing the River at any pass within your ⟨guard of⟩ it) in first...
As there are some other disputes of relative Rank subsisting among the Feild Officers of the Pennsylvania line, besides that between Majors Mentges, Murray and Nicol, I have desired Genl St Clair to direct such of them as are in Camp to attend your Board and lay before you their claims, upon which be pleased to make a report to me. I am my Lord Yr most obt Servt. Df , in Tench Tilghman’s...
When you shall have received certain intelligence of the Enemys retiring to Philadelphia—it will be expedient to march your Division and the different parties that were detached to join you with all convenient speed back to Camp—that they may as soon as possible be refreshed and provide for their Winter Shelter—this was intended to have been mentioned in this mornings Letter—but was omitted —I...
I should have issued orders for the fatigue parties intended to erect the Signals to assemble tomorrow but I was not certain that the Guides would be ready. Instead therefore of a general Order for the purpose, I would propose that you give directions to the parties from Woodfords and Scotts to erect the Signals at Steels Gap and the Hill upon Baskenridge Road. I will desire Genl Smallwood to...
General Wayne the better to cover the country in the vicinity of Stoney point and to confine the enemy within their works, has my permission to take a post in that vicinity. Haverstraw Forge has been more particularly mentioned—As I think this position is not intirely without danger, I wish your lordship to advance a corps of troops to some intermediate point between Suffrans and the forge...
By an act of Congress dated the 30th Ulto Genl Pulaskis Corps and all the Continental troops in the vicinity of Philadelphia are ordered to Princeton there to wait my orders or those of the Commanding Officer in Jersey —I leave it to Your Lordship to give them such instructions for their government as may appear to you most proper. I am Your Lordships most obedt Servt p.s. Such Detachments of...
I have directed General Maxwell to deliver up Hatfeild to the Civil Authority and have informed Governor Livingston that you will furnish him with such proofs of his Guilt as have come to your Knowledge; be pleased therefore to forward such papers to him as you have at present in possession, or any new matter which you may hereafter obtain, and which may serve to throw light upon the Affair. I...
I crave your refference to my Last to you of the 24th instant, Since which I am honord with your Lordships favour of the 20th—it gives me much pleasure to find that you are makeing Such good preparations for the Reception of the enemy, who have this day entirely quitted this harbour, a Brigade under General Sullivan will Set off on the Morrow to your assistance I will not be Long after, with...
The principal reason for halting the Army here to Night, is, that the Enemy from every Information I have receivd this day, have not advancd towards Phila. it follows I think, evidently (especially if it be true that part of them are at Bonners House where we dind) that this Army, and not the City, is their object; & of course that we should not be too far advanced towds them till our strength...
I have been favd with yours of the 13th and 18th instt with the several letters and papers they inclosed. Mr McHenry has informed me of the failure of the Refugee expedition to the Coast of Monmouth; but he mentions an account from Genl Maxwell of a Body of New Levies and Refugees having been embarked, supposed for Georgia. I could wish if it be so, that the numbers might be ascertained with...
Inclosed you will find an extract of a letter which I received yesterday from Governor Livingston, with twelve Copies of the Act for recruiting the number of Men therein mentioned. You will be pleased, in consequence of the Governor’s request, immediately to order as many Officers, as can possibly be spared from the Jersey line, to go upon the recruiting service, selecting such as are best...
Altho Col. Meade has already signified to you my desire that our present Camp should be minutely reconnoitred—it is a matter of such serious importance that I cannot forbear repeating to you my wish that yourself aided by General du Portail and some other officers would critically examine the position, all it’s avenues, and the adjacent ground—that in case we should have occasion to make use...
Upon your Arrival at Trenton you are to halt till you receive further orders. I do not think it prudent to advance the Army beyond Delaware before the Enemy enter the Capes, which they have not yet done. Should the Fleet come into the Bay we can be down below Philada before they can make any disposition for an attack either by land or Water, or should they return we shall be so far upon our...
I have been duly honored with your Lordships letter of the 5th; and the observations that were inclosed. I shall not fail should we be fortunate enough to have it in our power to enter upon such an undertaking as your Lordship has supposed, to pay them a proper attention and I have to request such further suggestions as may occur to your Lordship on this subject. We have however no certainty...
I am favd with yours of the 21st and 22d and have still to thank you for the particular and satisfactory intelligence which you communicate. If the embarkation now in preparation should be considerable, I think they must inevitably abandon New York, as their remaining force must be too small to risque the defence of the City upon. The Roads from Morris town to King’s ferry have become so...
The arrival of Arburthnot which comes to me, through different channels, makes it prudent to draw our force more together till we can ascertain the amount of the reinforcement by which we may form a better judgment what it will be practicable for the enemy to undertake —Your Lordship will therefore be pleased to march towards Junes leaving a regiment at Suffrans to give countenance to the...
I have this morning received a letter from Gen. Gates which has the following paragraph. “Two sailors belonging to Cape Cod who made their escape from the prison ship last monday night arrived here; they declare that the British fleet of men of war sailed ten days ago in quest of the french fleet.” Altho’ there is a certain want of probability in the relation, yet as it may be true, you will...