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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Rochambeau, Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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I have been honored with your letter of the 30th ulto from Hartford. In my last I informed your Excellency that 14 ships of the Line and 7 Frigates had sailed the 26th ulto from New York. I have not yet heard whether the remainder have sailed—neither have I received any intelligence respecting the evacuation of Charlestown—Your Excellency may be assured I shall give you instant information...
I arrived at this place yesterday at Noon. Upon my return I found intelligence contradicting that which I gave your Excellency from Hartford. The British Transports, I suppose, had made some change of disposition, which gave rise to the report of their having sailed and returned again to New York. I believe it may now be depended on that they sailed from the Hook the 13th instant. I am in...
I have sucessively received your two letters of the 8th and 10th. Other pressing occupations prevent my entering at this moment into the particulars of the last—I shall content myself with observing that I am happy to find our ideas substantially the same, and I hope a further explanation will obviate whatever little difference there may be. I have received advices that the enemy are again...
I do myself the honor to transmit your Excellency a packet which I received under a flying Seal from Sir Henry Clinton. I took the liberty to mention to Colo. Ternant that his exchange was compleated. Captains Bert and le Brun are I believe at Charlottville with Colo. Armand. Should your Excellency incline to exchange Lord Rawdon for any American Officer, I would wish you to insist upon his...
I had last evening the honor of receiving your Excellencys favor of the 7th from Princetown containing the agreeable intelligence of your approach. I have immediately forwarded your letter to Monsr de la Tombe by our Chain of Expresses. I have constantly kept the Marquis de Vaudreuil advised of Admiral Pigots motions, from the first information of his arrival upon these Coasts to his arrival...
I assure your Excellency, that I feel extreme pain at the occasion of that part of your letter of the 26th Inst. which relates to an intercepted letter of mine published by the enemy. I am unhappy, that an accident should have put it in their power to give to the world any thing from me, which may contain an implication the least disagreeable to you or to the Chevalier Des-Touches. I assure...
I cannot, My dear Genl, permit you to depart from this Country without repeating to you the high sense I entertain of the Services you have rendered America by the constant attention which you have paid to the Interests of it. By the exact order & discipline of the Corps under your command—and your readiness, at all times, to give facility to every measure which the force of the Combined...
I have been honored with your Excellency’s Favr of the 10th ulto—and am much obliged by your kind Condolence on the very heavy Loss which Mrs Washington & myself have suffered in the Death of the amiable youth Mr Custis. I arrived in this Town on the 27th ulto where, at the Request of Congress, I expect to remain some Weeks. I am glad to find that your Troops begin to find themselves...
On my arrival here a very disagreeable scene unfolded itself. By a lucky accident a conspiracy of the most dangerous kind the object of which was to sacrifice this post. has been detected. General Arnold, who has sullied his former glory by the blackest treason, has escaped to the enemy. This is an event that occasions me equal regret and mortification; but traitors are the growth of every...
The Count Ferchin will do me the Favor to deliver this to your Excellency—The Operations of this Day are over—but I am not so happy as to inform you that our Success has been equal to our Wishes—altho I have Reason to think that every essential Benefit will Result to our future Operations from the Opportunity I have had in a very full manner to reconnoitre the Position & Strength of the Enemy...
I had the pleasure to receive your Excellencys Letter of the 23d ulto at this place, where the American Army took their Encampment on the 31st. I am perfectly satisfied with the Route your Excellency has resolved to take in marchg your Army to the North River—and wish you to pursue it in the Mode that is most agreeable to yourself. I am glad to find you mention nothing of Your Fever & Ague—I...
I have had the honor of receiving Your Excellency’s Letter of the 28th of April, and of forwarding the Dispatches for the Chevalier de la Luzerne, which were transmitted to my care. I will expect the pleasure of Mr De Menonville’s Company in his route to Philadelphia. Nothing Material has occurred since my last Letter. With the highest esteem & respect I have the honor to be Sir Your...
I have the Honor of your Excellency’s Letter of the 15th—Being fully persuaded of your active Zeal & Wish to join the Army under my Command, I have only to intimate to you my Desire that you will not hurry your Troops by too rapid a March—but suffer them to make such Halts on their Rout, as you shall find convenient & necessary. By Information received from the Enemy at N. York, It seems they...
I last night had the honor of receiving your Excellency’s favor of the 11th. As you request me to name the time of meeting, I appoint Monday the 21st of this month at Weathersfeild which I think is as soon as will be possible for you, with convenience. General Knox and General du portail will accompany me. I will endeavour to be at Weathersfeild on saturday afternoon myself, and have made...
I am informed by Admiral Digby that the Ship New Blessing Capt. Thomas Craven will be dispatched as a Cartel from New York to Virginia with American prisoners and with Stores—Medicines and cloathing for the British seamen in Hospital at Gloucester or else where—Your Excellency as the Commanding Officer of his Most Christian Majesty’s ships of War will be pleased to point out the most...
I have this Moment the Honor of your Letter ⅌ Monsr Blanchard—I am very sorry for the Difficultys & Impediments which fall in the Way of your march—& hope they will decrease as you proceed. I have the Pleasure to inform your Excellency that My Troops arrived at the Ferry Yesterday & began to pass the River at 10 oClock in the morng & by Sunrise of this Day, they were all compleatly on this...
I have this instant received a Letter from Colo. Dayton, (an officer of intelligence in the American army, near Elizabeth town) which contain the inclosed paragraph. His informant must, I conceive, have magnified the enemy’s force, both in ships of the line, and in the strength of the detachment—nor do I conceive that the fleet could have sailed on the 8th, as he mentions, on account of the...
I do not find that the forc e upon Staten Island is large—or thrown over for any other purpose than that of defence—for which reason it is submited to your Excellencys judgment to march your Troops in one or two division’s as shall be most easy & convenient to them—there moving in two divisions succeeding days, will occasion no delay, as the Second will be up by the time the first will have...
At the moment of sending off the inclosed Letter to you of this same date, Your favor of the 8th of this Month, which had been long on the way came to hand. Your Idea of not moving the French Troops, in our present state of anxious uncertainty, is quite coincident with mine; but it is left entirely to your Judgment to maintain or alter that opinion as you may find necessary on further...
The french corps having staid at Williamsburgh, untill the first of July, without any plan of campaign being received from France, and none of the officers who had been sent to take his majesty’s orders being returned, and the time fit for the operations being so much advanced, it has been necessary to put the french corps in motion, having beforehand consulted the conjectures and the greatest...
I have been duly honored with your Excellency’s letter of the 10th and 13th instant. The 20th I had the pleasure of writing to you fully, principally on the subject of the Pensylvania line. It is with equal mortification and regret, I find myself obliged to add to that, the account of a second mutiny, which I had apprehended and which has lately taken place in the Jersey troops—When the...
I am sorry to inform you that one of our Messengers has been taken between this place and Morris Town. Among other Dispatches he had that which your Excellency enclosed in yours of the 28th of May for the Minister of France. The Enemy can gain no material information from my Letters and I Shall be happy to hear that they will be disappointed in yours. By Letters of the 24th of May from the...
I had the honor to receive yesterday a duplicate of your letter of the . Since the intelligence transmitted by the Marquis De la Fayette, I have received advices through different channels from New York that the Enemy are preparing an embarkation of troops—that fifty transports have moved up the North River for this purpose—and the object of it is said to be your fleet and army. Though this...
I have received your Excellency’s favor of the 19th of December. Since my last, which was on the 23d of December, I have gained intelligence, thro’ a channel on which I can depend, that the detachment which sailed from New York the 20th of last Month consisted of about 1600 Men, and was chiefly composed of drafts from the different British—German—and provincial Regiments. The Queens Rangers...
The inclosed Letter to the Marquis De Vaudreiul is left under a flying Seal for your Excellency’s Inspection—Information from Genl For-man of 24th & 26th instants part of British fleet Sailed—It contains the Intelligence which I have received from N. York respecting the Movement of the British fleet, part of which sailed the 26th inst. I have the Honor to be. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
The officer by whom I sent my dispatch for Count de Grasse has returned from Monmouth and has brought me an answer from Genl Forman to whom it is entrusted, and who promises to take the greatest care of it—The following is an extract of a letter from that Gentleman, which your Excellency will be pleased to communicate to Count de Barras, if you think proper. "Saturday the 21st of this month...
I have been honored with your Excellency’s favors of the 9 t h 13 t h and 15 t h instants—We have yet no official accounts of the evacuation of Charles town, but there are a variety of reasons for believing that it has taken place. I never could learn that any troops embarked on board the Fleet that sailed the 26 t h of last month. By information from New York, the remainder of the British...
When I had the honor of writing to You yesterday—from the hurry I was in I omitted to mention, that Major General Heath would remain with You agreable to your request, till I should think it necessary for him to join the Army. I write to him upon the subject to day. I have also given the Minister my opinion in favor of the utility of your proposal for engaging Hessian Deserters. Your...
On the 16th the fleet containing the embarkation, mentioned in my last, sailed—It consisted, according to the general tenor of my advices, of the grenadiers and light infantry, two levy corps detachments from several regiments and a small one of horse amounting in the whole to about three thousand. The destination most commonly supposed is a Southern one, which appears to me the more probable,...
I have the honor to enclose Your Excellency under a flying seal my letter to the Chevalier Des Touches in answer to his of the 20th instant, in Which I explain more precisely the grounds and import of the propositions which I had the honor to make to him through you. I shall add to the observations contained in this letter, that so far as related to my proposition for a detachment of land...
The packet arrived at New York last Monday—Nothing has yet transpired but what is contained in the inclosed Paper—I likewise inclose your Excellency an extract from the latest intelligence which I have received from New York, but you will observe that it is prior to the arrival of the Packet—Accounts by Deserters confirm the intended division of the British Fleet. I beg the favor of your...
Lt Colonels Gouvion and Gimat have obtained my permission to make a journey to Rhode Island to pay their respects to your Excellency and to see their friends in the army under your command. I had the honor of presenting these Gentlemen to you at Hartford—and take this occasion of recommending them to your attention, as officers who have served with distinction in our army, and who by their...
Major Talmadge an Officer of great merit who will have the honor of delivering this letter, will inform your Excellencys minutely of the State of the Enemys Refugee Post on Loyds Neck (Long Island) and will suggest the practicability of cutting off this Corps, and destroying the Enemys Shipping in the Sound, while the British fleet is absent. This would be a very desireable event on every...
I have not been honored with any of your Excellency’s favors since mine of the 4th instant—neither have I received any intelligences from New York contradicting what I communicated in that letter, on the contrary, the accounts seem confirmed. I have lately made an exchange of a considerable number of prisoners with Sir Henry Clinton—part of the British are at Rutland in Massachusetts Bay, and...
A few minutes after my arrival upon this Ground, I received your Excellency’s favor of this morning. Were I to give way to the anxiety I feel to see the Union between your Army and that of mine, I should request you to march tomorrow morning from North Castle, but when I consider the fatigue which your troops have undergone from their long and rapid marches, at this very hot season, I am much...
By letters which I have met at this place from the Marquis de la Fayette I find that he was embarked and had determined to fall as low down the Chesapeak as Annapolis as the passage is more certain from thence than from Elk River. I have received advice from Colo. Dayton an intelligent Officer stationed near Elizabeth town that the British transports at New York fell down to the Hook on...
I am much obliged to you for the agreeable intelligence contained in your letter of the 29th of January. I hope the confirmation will have enabled Mr Des–touches to take advantage of the event, in a manner as advancive of his own glory, as of the good of the service. I impatiently wait further advices. By the last accounts from Virginia which come down to the 20th Arnold had reimbarked from...
I received intelligence last night from General Heath—that the British Transports which were supposed to have sailed from New York on the 9th returned again to the watering place on the 11th. Various are the conjectures and reports in New York upon the occasion, but I hope the true reason is, that finding the French Fleet a head of them, they did not chuse to risque the detachment. I shall...
I have recd your Excellency’s favors of the 14th 16th 24th and 27th of November and 1st of this month. In apology for suffering so many of your letters to remain so long unanswered, I must assure you, that I have been constantly employed, since I broke up my Camp near passaic Falls, in visiting the winter Cantonments of the Army between Morris town and this place. I have experienced the...
Before Mr Morris left Camp he made a proposal which he desired might be communicated to your Excellency—He informed me that he understood Mr Tarlé had between two and three thousand Barrels of Flour upon the upper parts of the North River, and as he imagined it could not now be wanted in that quarter he made an offer of supplying you with an equal quantity to the southward, if that above...
I have had the Honor of receiving your Excellency’s Favor of the 23d Inst. from Hartford. It would have given me the greatest Pleasure could I have made it convenient to have met you at Newtown...but independant of many Arrangements which are necessary at the first taking the Field, I am detained by the hourly Expectation of His Excellency the Chevr de le Luzerne. I am pleas’d to find that...
I have the Honor of your Letter of the 13th of this Mo. Since the Information I conveyed to your Excellency, by the Baron Closen, the Amusement of peace held out by our Enemies has been much augmented by the Arrival of Sir Guy Carleton in N. York, who enounces himself as Commander in Chief in America—with powers of Conciliation to these States—pleasg as their first prospect might have been,...
J’ai reçu la lettre du 5. dont Votre Excellence m’a honoré, le Retour de l’Ennemi vous a été confirmé par une lettre avant celle-ci. S’ils avoient poussé leur pointe, les arrangemens que Votre Excellence avoit pris pour les recevoir avoient un aspect très favorable. Je me flatte que la nouvelle reçue de la 2de division que l’un a vue en secor ay de l’authorité, Je pense avec Votre Excellence...
I have been honored with your Excellencys favor of the 27th ulto. Under present appearances I think Genl de Choissy should not move beyond Charlotte Court House—There are several reasons to induce a belief that the enemy mean to evacuate south Carolina and Georgia—If such an event is to take place we must soon know it. I requested His Excellency the Minister of France to inform you that...
The idea of an embarkation gains strength by the concurring testimony of emissaries and deserters, and seems to be on the point of taking place. On such an event it might be of importance that we should both be with our respective armies—which induces me to request our meeting may be deferred ’till the 25th instant. I hope this letter will arrive in time to anticipate your setting out, and...
I have this moment received Intelligence from Kings bridge, that the Refugees have been impressing some Horses this day from the Inhabitants, this used to be commonly an indication of their making an incursion, towards us—If they have any thing of the kind in view at present, it is, I am persuaded, a design to attack some of our Picquets, or drive off any Cattle which may be exposed to them—I...
In my letter to your Excellency of the 10th of December last, I requested you to grant passports upon the application of David Ross Esqr. for any Vessells which might be laden with Tobacco for the payment of Goods purchased of the British Merchants at York Town. It has been since suggested, that Passports of Merchandize of every kind, if granted by any other power than that of Congress or...
I have the pleasure to inform your Excellency that the detachment sent against the Mutineers as mentioned in my last, surrounded them in their Quarters on the Morning of the 27th and demanded an immediate surrender, which was complied with on their part without the least attempt to resist—Two of the principal actors were executed on the spot & the remainder pardoned. From the appearances of...
I am much obliged to your Excellency for the interesting pariculars you do me the honor to communicate in your letters of the 18th and 20th—We may now hope every thing for the safety of your valuable envoy and the important with which he is charged. Since the confirmation of Ferguson’s defeat and the Retreat of Cornwallis to Camden, we have nothing new from the South, except an intercepted...
I have been honored with Your Excellency’s favors of the 30th of April and 4th of this month. The first was delivered to me by Colo. Menonville, to whom I refer you for what has passed between us on the subject of his mission. I have received no particular intelligence from New York since that of the 29th ulto, which has been communicated to your Excellency. I very sincerely wish success to...