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I have had the honor of receiving your Excellency’s and the Chevalier des Touche’s joint letter of the 25th and your own of the 26th. The absence of your light Frigates renders the plan which Major Tallmadge proposed impracticable for the present. We will, however, keep the enterprise in view, and may, perhaps, at some future time, find an opportunity of carrying it into execution with...
I have the honor to congratulate Your Excellency on the safe arrival of the Viscount De Rochambeau at the Court of Versailles. My authority is derived from the President of Congress who in a letter of the 14th instant writes me thus. "By letters just come to hand from Mr Carmichael at Madrid, I am informed that the son of Count De Rochambeau is safe arrived in France"—I hope every thing...
I was yesterday honored with your Excellencys favor of the 10th Inst. I am extremely sorry to hear of the loss at the Diligente—The Chevalier Clonard appears to have done every thing that could have been expected from an active intelligent Officer. In a former Letter I expressed my approbation of the exchange of a number of the British Convalescents left a Gloucester for those taken in the...
My last to Your Excellency was on the 16th inst. I have since that received information that an embarkation has taken place at New York—It is said to consist of three British Regiments and a detachment of Hessian Grenadiers. They may have sailed by this time, but of this I have no certain accounts. They are to be convoyed by two Ships of the Line and two or three Frigates. It is conjectured...
I had the honor of writing you the 12th instant approving the demand you intended to make to your count for an augmentation of your siege artillery to double the present quantity—I have since received your letter of the 8th. The season is so far advanced that I think you cannot too soon make the dispositions you propose for winter quarters, which are as agreable to me as they are judicious—I...
Agreeable to my promise I now inclose to your Excellency the Route by Coriell’s Ferry—the particular Stages & Distances I have noted, from which you will form your own Estimation for each Days march. I was yesterday favored with a Philadelphia paper of the 30th of July, wch mentions the Arrival of 13 Ships of the Line 2 frigates & a Cat under Comd of Monr Va u dreuil at the Capes of...
I am honored with your Excellency’s favor of the 28th ulto. I flatter myself the Count de Barras will meet with no interruption upon his passage, as I have reason to think the British Fleet are off the Hook. I have deferred writing to your Excellency, in hopes that I should have been able to have learnt, with certainty, whether there was any thing in the report which General St Clair forwarded...
I have been honored with your Excellency’s favor of the 31st ulto. Your remarks upon the uncertainty of operations which depend upon a combination of Land and sea Forces, except there is a decisive superiority over the enemy as to the latter, are judicious, and consonant to the Ideas which I had ever entertained upon the subject. Upon maturely considering the offer which your Excellency has...
I have been successively honored with your letters of the 13th 16th and 19th of Octobr. I think the change you have made respecting Lauzun’s cavalry will be an advantageous one. Since my last, we have accounts both by way of Statia and New York that the Combined fleets consisting of thirty sail of the line off Cape Finisterre, fell in with an outward bound fleet and took fifty odd sail of...
I have received Your Excellency’s favor of the 6th. I have no intelligence of Admiral Arbuthnots arrival at New York or at Sandy Hook—perhaps he may be standing at a greater distance from the Land than heretofore, to avoid the gales of wind which may be commonly expected upon the coast at this season—I received the following from New York yesterday, whether the men of War alluded to were the...
I have looked with anxious impatience my dear count, for those dispatches from your court, the arrival of which to you was to be the moment of our interview at Phila. I have been in such dayly expectation of this event that I have not Ventured more than fifteen miles from this place Lest your summons should arrive here in my absence. the season of operating in this quarter is flying away...
I last night received your Excellency’s favor of the 27th announcing the return of the Squadron under the command of the Chevalier Des Touche to the Harbour of New-Port. A few minits before your Letter reached me, the inclosed, which His Excellency the Minister of France had the goodness to send under an open cover to me, informed me of the action which had happened on the 16th off the Capes...
I have received information from New York, that Admiral Rodneys fleet with the transports which have been some time preparing fell down to the Hook on Saturday last. The number of troops which they have on board is uncertain. If the Admiral with his ships of War, means to form a junction with Arbuthnot, you will soon perceive it by the augmentation of the fleet which keeps off Newport; if on...
I have the honor of your Excellency’s Letter of the 22nd—The Packet for the Minister was immediately forwarded. We have yet no advices directly from Charles Town. I inclose your Excellency some of the latest New York and Philadelphia Papers. After you have read them be pleased to forward them to the Admiral—By the first it appears that Lord Howe’s Fleet had met with a severe gale of Wind,...
In a Letter which I have this Day received from the Secretary at War, in the followg paragraph—"When our Troops retired from York Town in Virginia, a large Quantity of Ordnance & Ordnance Stores were left for the Use of the French Troops, who were to occupy that post—As the french Troops have left Virginia, I suppose our Artillery & Stores will be no longer wanted, if they are not, I think it...
Upon a full consideration of all circumstances I am of opinion, that the march of the French Army under your command had better be by the following Route , and on the following days. Sunday. 19th to North Castle 14 Miles. Monday, 20th to Kings Ferry 18 Do. Allowing for the common chances of Winds and Weather, it may take ’till Thursday 22nd to cross the North River. Friday 23d to Suffrans 16...
I ask you ten thousand pardons for breaking the Seal of the Inclosed Letter, to your Address. It was put into my hands with other dispatches, and was opened before I discovered the mistake—It happened too, in the moment I was expecting Letters from Sir Guy Carleton. I have the honor to be with Sentiments of the most perfect esteem & regard Yr Excellys Most Obt Servt P.S. The Enemy were about...
I have been honored by your Excellency’s Letter of the 6th instant—and thank you for the Communication of Genl Green’s of the 10th ulto—I think he need not be much alarmed on Account of the movement of the Legion—from the present Situation of the Enemy, I am persuaded no Reinforcement will be sent from N. York to Carolina. I am equally impatient with your Excellency, for Intelligence from...
Your Excellency’s letter of the 5th did not arrive ’till late last evening—I agree in opinion with you on the utility of asking to have your present park doubled; but I think this will suffice. Though we are not well provided with siege artillery, we shall be able to supply the deficiency. We are again told of an embarkation at New York on the point of sailing; the number is not ascertained;...
I have to inform your Excellency, that I have received an account from New York, that another embarkation was preparing at that place. The detachment which appears to be about 2500 Men is to be commanded by Generals Knyphausen and Phillips. The destination was not publicly known, but supposed to be to the Southward. This information does not come to me thro’ a Channel on which I perfectly...
I have had the honor to receive Your Excellencys Letter of the 8th and can assure you nothing on my part shall be wanting to induce Congress & the States to make as great preparations as possible for a combined operation & to improve every aid His Most Christian Majesty may be pleased to afford to the best advantage. It was with extreme Satisfaction I heard the joyful News of the birth of a...
I have been honored with your Excellencys favors of the 12th and 22d ulto the last inclosing Copies of General Greene’s letter to you and your answer—After informing you, that I concur with you in opinion, that it would not be politic, at this moment, to move a detachment from your main Body to the southward, permit me to assure you that I very sensibly feel your goodness in determining to...
It is with infinite satisfaction I embrace the earliest opportunity of sending to Philadelphia the Cannon which Congress were pleased to present to your Excellency in testimony of their Sense of the illustrious part you bore in the capture of the British Army under Lord Cornwallis at York in Virginia. The Carriages will follow by another Conveyance; but as they were not quite ready, I could...
I have been honored with your Excellency’s favor of the 2d, and am much obliged by the confidential communication of your dispatches from St Domingo. It is with pleasure I transmit your Excellency the Copy of a letter from Brigadier General Morgan to Major Genl Greene, giving an account of a decisive Victory gained by him over Lt Colo. Tarleton on the 17th of January. I am in hopes that this...
I have been honored with your Excellency’s Favor of last Night—and feel myself much obliged by the Readiness with which you comply to the Request I had the Honor to make to you in my last. The Information conveyed by your Excellency, I had before received; altho not in so pointed a View with Respect to Numbers. The Enemy’s Apprehensions of our Intention, & the Probability I had reason to...
On the first Acct of your arrival I did myself the honor to write you the letter annexed; but in momentary expectation of hearing from you, I thought it best to delay the departure of the Marquis till the arrival of your dispatches. These Monsr De Rochefontaine delivered me yesterday Afternoon. The assurances you give me of the ulterior intentions of His Most Christian Majesty add to our...
Your letter of the 25th Instant reached me yesterday, Sir Henry Clinton has sailed as mentioned in my last with the principal part of his force to attack you—estimated at about eight thousand men; it cannot be more, nor do I suppose he would hazard the enterprise with a much less number. I am glad the inactivity of the Enemy has given you time to prepare; and relying on your abilities and the...
In my last I barely acknowledged the Rect of your Excellency’s favr of the 18th of Decemr. I have since been honored with that of the 24th. I am fearful that the Expresses between this place and Williamsburg are badly regulated, and I shall upon the return of the Quarter Master Genl from the North River endeavour to have things put in better train. I am extremely sorry to hear of the loss of...
I have been honoured with your Excellency’s favors of the 8th Instt from Newport and 13th from Boston—I am obliged by your communication of the Letter from the commanding Officer at St Domingo but cannot help being anxious for the Safety of Monsr Monteiuls Squadron. The intelligence brought by the Vessel from Nantes to Boston is very interesting I am in hopes that the Captn has good grounds...
I was yesterday honored with your letter of the 30th July. I applaud all the measures you have taken, which appear to me precisely such as the occasion required, and I was very happy to hear that the neighbouring States manifested so much ardor in doing what their interest, their duty and their gratitude demanded from them. It is my wish you should detain the levies as long as you think they...
From the head of Elk the Cavalry, Carriages & such Artillery as may be sent by Land, will proceed by the following Rout. Lower ferry on Susquehanna. Baltimore. Elk ridge Landing Bladensburg. George Town—on Potomack River. From hence a Rout must be pursued to Fredericksburg, that will avoid an inconvenient ferry over Occoquan and Rappahannock River at the Town of Fredericksburg. The former may,...
I do myself the Honor to inclose Your Excellency a Martinico Gazette of the 3rd of May which announces the Arrival of the Count de Grasse and gives an imperfect Account of the Action between the Fleets. This was sent me by the Minister with a Desire that it might be forwarded to You. But by Intelligence as late as the 8th of May it appears that the Count, unable to overtake Hood, had returned...
In my Letter of the 31st Ulto I informed Your Excellency, that there had been an Action between General Greene and Lord Cornwallis on the 15th of March; the particulars of which had not then been received. I have now the honor of enclosing the Copy of a Letter from Major General Greene, in which he gives the circumstances of that Engagement in detail: from this, and other Accounts, I cannot...
I had, last Evening, the honor of receiving your favor of the 31st of May, by the Duke de Lauzun, who informs me, that he is authorised by your Excellency and the Count de Barras to enter into a free communciation with me, upon the subject of the Council of War held on board the Duke de Burgogne, and to request my opinion upon the propriety of their determination. I must confess to your...
I was yesterday honored with your Excellency Letter by Genll de Choisey inclosing Copies of your Correspondence with the Marquis de Vaudruiel on the subject of his proposed Expedition, and requesting my opinion upon that enterprize, to be transmitted to the Marquis on his arrival at Boston. A Copy of my Letter to the Marquis de Vaudruiel, which is inclosed, will shew your Excellency my...
I have been honored with your Excellency’s favor of the 21st: I have not received any intelligence from the Southward since the letter of the 15th from the Marquis de la Fayette, the substance of which I communicated to your Excellency in my last. I cannot but look upon this as very unaccountable; for, I think, had either Fleet reached the Chesapeak by the 20th, I should have heard of it,...
Agreeable to your Excellency’s request I have written to Governor Hancock to call out the Militia in the neighbourhood of Boston should the enemy threaten the Fleet under the command of the Marquis de Vaudreuil. I have the honor to be most sincerely yr Excellency’s obt and hble servt. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I have just received advices from pretty good authority; of which the inclosed is a copy. From the complexion and agreement of these accounts, it seems very probable, that the Count De Guichen is really approaching the coast. Should this be the case it is of so much importance to lose no time in concerting our plans, that I renew my proposal for meeting you and the Admiral the 20th instant,...
I have had the honor of receiving your several letters of the 23d, 27th & 29th. I am happy to hear that the Frigate and our friend have taken their departure under such favourable auspices. I join with you in the warmest wishes for their safety and expedition. By recent advices there appears to be a large fleet of transports &ca appearing at New York to sail—and it is added another embarkation...
I thank you for the immediate communication contained in your letter of the 24th of the agreeable intelligence of the success of the naval detachment in Chesapeak bay—& I am happy to find at the same time that Mr Destouchés was preparing a second detachment for an ulterior cooperation. I have renewed my orders to the Marquis De la Fayette who commands the Corps sent from hence to push forward...
The Count de St Mesmes, last evening, did me the honor to deliver me your letter of the 3d instant. It appears by the report of the Naval Officer, that the enemy were inferior to the Chevr Des Touche, and from the situation of the Bedford, and the America would probably remain so for some time. It appears also to have been your Excellency’s expectation that Mr Des Touche would either go with...
I have duly received your Excellency’s favours of the 25th and 30th of Septembr and am much obliged to you for the different informations you do me the honor to communicate. We have to regret that this Campaign has not been productive of such important advantages as we had reason to flatter ourselves, but we must hope for better successes the next. The operation of the Spaniards in the...
I have the pleasure of inclosing Your Excellency copies of two letters from Major General Greene, which it appears that an agreeable train of successes have attended our affairs in South Carolina. The consequences will be important, but they would be more so, had we a sufficient force in that quarter to pursue the advantages we have gained. I have heard nothing further from the Marquis de la...
I have been honored with your Excellency’s favor of the 5th instant, to which, my letters of the 9th and 12th of this month will have served for an answer. In my letters of the 14th of January and 9th of February, I requested the favor of your Excellency to negotiate the exchange of Brigr Genl Lord Rawdon for Brigr Genl Moultrie. I since find, that Gentleman has been exchanged, by composition,...
I have this morning received your Excellency’s favor of the 8th. Give me leave most sincerely to congratulate you on the safe return of the Viscount de Rochambeau, who I hope is the Bearer of agreeable intelligences. A Copy of your letter has been instantly transmitted to His Excellency the Minister at Philadelphia. I will meet your Excellency at Weathersfield, at any time which you shall be...
I have been honored with your Excellency’s favors of the 22d and 25th of December and 1st instant. The reasons assigned by your Excellency for declining, at this time, the enterprize, which I took the liberty to refer to your consideration, are weighty, but the representation made by the Chevalier Destouche, of the impossibility of going to Sea for want of Bread, renders the measure...
It must, my dear Count, have been a pleasing event to you, to have landed on your native shore, crowned with Laurels after a perilous passage and the hazard of being taken—and to have received as I am perswaded you must have done the Smiles of a wise & generous Prince. On these happy events I sincerely congratulate you. To the generous aids of your Nation, & the bravery of its Sons, is to be...
I was yesterday honored with your letter of the 22d instant, which I immediately transmitted to His Excellency The Chevalier De la Luzerne. I am happy to learn the safe arrival of the missing transport at Boston. The precaution you recommend for giving notice to the second division is very necessary and important. It is probable the Delaware will be thought the best reception for the Troops,...
By Intelligence which I have received since my Arrival at this Place, I find that the Enemy have been throwing Troops upon Staten Island—This Circumstance, & a Desire to bring up the Rear of the two armies, will induce me to halt the Amercan Troops one Day at Springfield—as I pray your Excellency to do those of the French at Whippany. This Halt will occasion no Delay, as I could not, before...
I have been honored with your Excellency’s favors of the 15th and 18th instants. I am obliged by the care which you promise to take of my packet for Mr Laurens. Major Tallmadge, who your Excellency will have seen before this reaches you, has been upon Long Island, and there obtained intelligence that the British Fleet had returned to New York. From whence I conclude that the whole are there. I...