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    • Washington, George
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    • Reed, Joseph
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    • Revolutionary War

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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Reed, Joseph" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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After you left this yesterday Mr Tudor presented me with the Inclosed—as there may be some observations worthy of notice I forward it to you, that it may be presented to the Congress; but I would have his remarks upon the frequency of General Courts Martial consider’d with some degree of caution, for although the nature of his Office affords him the best oppertunity of discovering the...
The Ship-wreck of a Vessell, said to be from Philadelphia to Boston near Plymouth, with 120 Pipes of Wine, 118 of which are save’d—another from Boston to Hallifax near Beverly, with about 240£s worth of dry Goods—the taking of a Wood Vessel bound to Boston by Captn Adams —and the sudden departure of Mr Randolph (occassiond by the death of his Uncle) are all the occurrances, worth noticing,...
Your Letters of the 4th from New York—7th and—from Philadelphia (the last by Express) are all before me; and gave me the pleasure to hear of your happy meeting with Mrs Reed, without any other accident than that of leaving a Horse by the way. The hint contain’d in the last of your Letters respecting your continuance in my Family; in other words, your wish that I could dispense with it, gives...
Your Letter of the 16th by Post now lyes before me, & I thank you for the attention paid to my Memorandums; the arrival of Money will be an agreeable Circumstance. I recollect no occurrance of moment since my last, except the taking possession of Cobble Hill on Wednesday night[.] this to my great surprize we did, & have worked on ever since, without receiving a single Shott from Bunkers...
By Post, I wrote to you yesterday in answer to your Letter of the 16th, since which your favours of the 15th & 17th are come to hand. In one of these you justly observe, that the sudden departure of Mr Randolph must cause your absence to be the more sensibly felt; I can truely assure you that I miss you exceedingly; & if an express declaration of this be wanting, to hasten your return, I make...
Two days ago I wrote fully to you by Captn Blewer—to this Letter I refer—since which your favr of the 20th with the agreeable Post[s]cript of the 21st, is come to hand, and demands my acknowledgements for the Civility intended Mrs Washington, by you &ca. I have a very singular pleasure in informing of you, that by Express last Night from Cape Ann, I received the glad tidings of the Capture of...
Since my last, I have had the pleasure of receiving your Favours of the 28th Ulto and 2d Instt. I must again express my gratitude for the attention shewn Mrs Washington at Philadelphia—It cannot but be pleasing, altho’ it did in some measure, impede the progress of her journey on the Road. I am much obliged to you for the hints containd in both of the above Letters respecting the jealousies...
Since my last your favours of the 7th, & 11th as also the 8th are come to hand—the first last Night—the 2d by Wednesdays Post; for the several pieces of information therein contain’d I thank you. Nothing new has happened in this Quarter since my last, except the setting in of a severe spell of cold Weather & considerable fall of Snow; which, together, have interrupted our work on Litchmeres...
Since my last, I have recd your obliging favours of the 19th & 23d Ulto & thank you for the Articles of Intelligence therein containd; as I also do for the Buttons which accompanied the last Letter, althô I had got a sett, better I think, made at Concord. I am exceeding glad to find, that things wear a better face in Virginia than they did sometime ago; but I do not think that any thing less...
The bearer presents an oppertunity to me, of acknowledging the receipt of your favour of the 30th Ulto (which never came to my hands till last Night) and, if I have not done it before, of your other of the 23d preceeding. The hints you have communicated from time to time not only deserve, but do most sincerely, and cordially meet with my thanks—you cannot render a more acceptable service, nor...
Real necessity, compells me to ask you whether I may entertain any hopes of your returning to my Family? if you can make it convenient, and will hint the matter to Colo. Harrison, I dare venture to say that Congress will make it agreeable to you in every shape they can—My business Increases very fast, and my distresses for want of you, along with it—Mr Harrison is the only Gentleman of my...
In my last (date not recollected) by Mr John Adams, I communicated my distresses to you, on Acct of my want of your Assistance —since this, I have been under some concern at doing of it, least it should precipitate your return before you were ripe for it, or bring on a final resignation, which I am unwilling to think of, if your return can be made convenient and agreeable—True it is, that from...
I had wrote the Letter herewith Inclosed before your favour of the 21st came to hand —The Acct given of the behaviour of the Men under Genl Montgomerie is exactly consonant to the opinion I have form’d of these People, and such as they will exhibit abundant proofs of in similar cases whenever called upon—Place them behind a Parapet—a Breast Work—Stone Wall—or anything that will afford them...
Your obliging favours of the 28th Ulto & 1st Instt are now before me, & claim my particular thanks for the polite attention you pay to my wishes, in an early, & regular Communication of what is passing in your Quarter. If my dear Sir, you conceive that I took any thing wrong, or amiss, that was conveyed in any of your former Letters you are really mistaken—I only meant to convince you, that...
A Line or two from you by Colo. Bull, which came to hand last Evening, is the only Letter I have receivd from you since the 21st of Jany —this added to my getting none from any other Corrispondant to the Southward, leads me to apprehend some miscarriage. I am to observe thô that the Saturday’s Post is not yet arrived—by that I may, possibly, get Letters. We have, under as many difficulties...
We have, at length, got the Ministerial Troops in this Quarter on Ship board. Our possessing Dorchester Heights, as mentioned in my last, put them (after they had given over the design of attacking us) into a most violent hurry to Imbark, which was still further precipitated on Sunday Morning by our breaking Ground on Nukes hill (the point nearest the Town) the night before. The whole Fleet is...
Since my last, things remain nearly in Statu-quo—the Enemy have the best nack at puzling People I ever met with in my life. They have blown up—burst—and demolished the Castle, totally; and are now all in Nantasket Road—have been there ever since Wednesday; what doing the Lord knows—various are the conjectures; the Bostonians think there stay there absolutely necessary to fit them for Sea, as...
General Howe has a grand Manouvre in view—or—has made an inglorious retreat. Yesterday Evening the remains of the British Fleet left Nantasket Road & (except an Arm’d Vessel or two) hath left the Coast quite clear of an Enemy—Six more Regiments will instantly March for New York—two days hence another, and a day or two after that our whole force, except about 3 or four Regiments to erect such...
By the Express which I sent to Philadelphia a few days ago I wrote you a few hasty lines —I have little time to do more now, as I am hurried in dispatching one Brigade after another for New York and preparing for my own departure, by pointing out the Duties of those that remain behind me. Nothing of Importance has occurr’d—in these parts—since my last—unless it be the Resignation of Generals...
Your favour of the 13th was this Instt put into my hands—scarce time enough to acknowledge, the receipt of it (by this Post) and to thank you for your great care and attention in providing my Camp Equipage—whatever the list you sent, may fall short of your Intention of Providing, can be got here; and may be delayed; as the want, or not of them, will depend upon Circumstances. I am exceedingly...
I have been favourd with several of your Letters since I came to this place, some of them indeed after getting pretty well advanced on the Road towards Boston—My extreame hurry, with one kind of business and engagement or another, leaves me little more than time to express my concern for your Indisposition, and the interposition of other obstacles to prevent me from receiving that aid from you...
The inclosed was put into my hands by an Express from the White Plains. Having no Idea of its being a Private Letter, much less Suspecting the tendency of the Correspondence, I opened it, as I had done all other Letters to you, from the Same place and Peekskill, upon the business of your office, as I Conceived and found them to be. This as it is the truth, must be my excuse for Seeing the...
The bearer is sent down to know whether your plan was attempted last Night—and if not, to inform you that Christmas day at Night, one hour before day is the time fixed upon for our Attempt on Trenton. For heaven’s sake keep this to yourself, as the discovery of it may prove fatal to us, our numbers, sorry I am to say, being less than I had any conception of—but necessity, dire necessity...
I was this morning favoured with yours & thank you much for your kind congratulations & wishes. I regret much the Accident that prevented the passage of our Troops. had it not been for that cause and the Several attacks intended, had been made, I am persuaded our Plans would have succeedd to our warmest wishes. I have several Letters to write & therefore must refer you to Colo. Cadwalader who...
Yours of the eleventh is Come to hand if the account the prisoners give be true it is a very agreeable & important one. the order you Sent to Colonel Winds has interferd with a plan, Concerted by Generals Sullivan & Maxwell, whenever you have occasion to order a Movement of any part of the Army, it will be best to apply to the Commanding Officer, Lest it may, [(]as it has in the present...
I very much approve of your visiting Genl Putnam, as I cannot acct for his remaining at Crosswicks instead of removing to Princeton, as I have desird in several of my Letters. I would have him keep nothing at Princeton (except two or three days provisions) but what can be moved of at an hours warning—in that case, if good Scouting Parties are kept constantly out, no possible damage can happen...
The Inclosed was intended to have gone by the Express who brought me your last Letter. He came in the Evening of the 13th was desired to call early next Morning, & I have never seen or heard of him since. Many days ago I wrote to Genl Putnam (supposing him to be at Princeton) to have the Stores rescued from the hands of the Militia who had borne them off, and had no doubt but he had done it....
Your Letters of the 16 & 17th Inst. are both before me. I have come to a Resolution to recall the Protections given by Genl Howe, & am now preparing something by way of Proclamation for that purpose in order that the Country may stand upon the same Footing or friends distinguished from Foes. I have also Issued something in general Orders explaining the former Orders relative to the...
Your Letters of the 13th and 18th Instt are both to hand—the last in date arrived first, the first this Morning only—I am sorry, upon the footing you have put it, and under the apprehensions you seem to be, that I did not accept your Commission as Adjt Genl when you offered it, tho your fears cannot be realizd, because at that time it was mentiond in Genl Orders, that you having resign’d,...
Letter not found: to Joseph Reed, 14 Mar. 1777. Reed writes to GW on 22 Mar. “to acknowledge your Excellys Favour of the 14th Instt.”