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Letter not found: to Gouverneur Morris, 20 April 1776. Morris’s letter to GW of this date is endorsed in Stephen Moylan’s writing: “ansd Same day.”
I have received the pleasure of your favour of yesterday’s date. The reasons you assign for the interval of silence on your part are admitted as sufficient; though I regret that the principal one exists—the combination of the tories for a general insurrection. But perhaps on the scale of policy I ought rather to congratulate you on the event: That there are too many tories in your state as...
I this moment received the favour of your letter of the 16th instant. I partly agree and partly disagree with you respecting the deficiencies of your constitution. That there is a want of vigor in the executive, I believe will be found true. To determine the qualifications proper for the chief executive Magistrate requires the deliberate wisdom of a select assembly, and cannot be safely lodged...
I received your favour of the 4th, by express. If I recollect how far my last went, it did not announce the return of the enemy from Westfield to Amboy, nor their evacuation of that place since. After resting and refreshing themselves a night, they decamped the following day and proceeded to Amboy from which place they went to Staten Island as expeditiously as they could; where they still...
Your favour of the 18th ⟨from Saratoga reached me⟩ yesterday. Your pronouncing Fort Edward among the other forts indefensible surprises me a little, as it is intirely contrary to the representations of several Gentlemen of judgment, who have had an opportunity of seeing and considering its situation, by whom we have been taught to believe, that it would be an excellent post, at least ⟨for⟩...
Agreeable to the intention of the Council I have delivered their inclosed letter to His Excellency who after perusing it has sealed and forwarded it to Mr. Hancock. The relieving Fort Schuyler is a very happy and important event, and will concur with the two happy strokes given by Harkemar and Stark to reverse the face of affairs and turn the scale against Mr Burgoigne. I hope Capt...
I received your obliging favor of the 18th Inst., only Yesterday evening. I thank you much for the explanatory hints it contains and could have wished it had come to hand a little sooner. I have many things to say to you, but as the Express, who will deliver you this, is going with dispatches that will not admit delay, I shall content myself with taking notice of one matter, that appears to me...
Your favor of the 15th Inst. gave me singular pleasure—I thank you for the agreeable intelligence it contains; which (tho not equal to my wishes) exceeds my expectation, & is to be lamented only for the delay, as the evils, consequent of it, will, soon (as I have often foretold) be manifested in the moving state of the Army, if the Departments of Quarter Master and Commissary will enable us to...
I have a Word to say to you upon the Subject of Promotion which we have just now finished or rather unfinished at least if that Matter was before in an unfinished Situation. That famous incomprehensible Baltimore Resolution (unluckily perhaps) introduced a very tedious Debate which terminated at Length by rejecting the whole of what the Committee reported with relation to the Promoting of...
I thank you for your favors of the 21st & 23d Instt both of which have come to hand since my last to you —had such a chapter as you speak of, been written to the rulers of Mankind, it would, I am perswaded, have been as unavailing as many others upon subjects of equal importance—we may lament that things are not consonant to our wishes, but cannot change the nature of Man; & yet, those who are...
Whether you are indebted to me, or I to you a Letter I know not, nor is it a matter of much moment—The design of this is to touch, cursorily, upon a Subject of very great importance to the well being of these States; much more so than will appear at first view—I mean the appointment of so many foreigners to Offices of high rank & trust in our Service. The lavish manner in which Rank has...
I was yesterday favoured with your Letter of the 31st Ulto—The one you allude to, came to hand about five days before. I thank you for your very polite and friendly appeal, upon the Subject of half bounty in solid Coin. The measure, I have no doubt, would produce an Instant benefit, so far as the engaging drafts &ca might be concerned; but I am certain, many mischievous and pernicious...
My public Letters to the Presidt of Congress will inform you of the Wind that wafted me to this place —nothing more therefore need to be said on that head. Your Letter of the 8th Ulto contains three questions & answers—to wit—Can the Enemy prosecute the War? Do they mean to stay on the Continent? And is it our interest to put impediments in the way of their departure? To the first you answer...
I thank you for your favor of the 11th which I received by the last Post. You know when a House is on the move and packing up, all the family are commonly busy—and all is hurry—so it is when an Army is changing it’s ground for new Quarters. This circumstance must plead my excuse for not going fully into your Letter. You are certainly right in your position that we must act according to our...
I have received your favor of the 14th Instt by Colo. Morgan, and have had a good deal of conversation with him respecting our affairs to the Westward. I wish matters had been more prosperously conducted under the command of Genl McIntosh—This Gentlemn was in a manner a stranger to me, but during the time of his residence at Valley forge I had imbibed a good opinion of his good sense—attention...
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] May 8, 1779 . States reasons for favoring a campaign in South. Discusses distressing state of the Army. Df , in writings of George Washington and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Morris was a delegate to Congress from New York.
Monsieur Gerard did me the honor to deliver me your favour of the 26th—I shall always be obliged to you, my dear Sir, for a free communication of your sentiments on whatsoever subject may occur. The objects of your letter were important. Mr Gerard I dare say has made it unnecessary for me to recapitulate what passed between him and myself and has informed you of the alternative I proposed for...
Your favor of the 21st ulto did not reach me till a longer time after its date, than is usual between this and Philadelphia. I cannot for a variety of reasons which will occur to you, undertake to designate the persons who shd receive the provision of Congress—or to fix upon the Sums which might be adequate. They are points of too great delicacy for me to interfere in. The Committee on the...
Your letter of the 28th Ulto I met with on my way to these quarters, where I arrived on the 6th Instt. The suggestions contained in it required no apology, as it gives me pleasure at all times to know the sentiments of others upon matters of public utility—Those however which you have delivered relative to an enterprize against the enemy in New York, exhibit strong evidence how little the...
Whereas a proposition was made by me on the 6th day of December last to General Sir Henry Clinton to the following effect "That Commissioners mutually appointed should meet at such time and place as might thereafter be agreed upon for the purposes of obviating all difficulties in exchanges—for liquidating the expenses of maintaining prisoners and for making solid arrangements for providing for...
The powers of equal date herewith authorise you to proceed to Elizabeth Town in the State of New Jersey in order to meet Commissioners on the part of the enemy on Friday the 15th inst. for the purposes in the powers fully recited. You will consider the settlement of accounts, for the subsistence of Prisoners of all descriptions from the commencement of the War, to —obtaining payment or...
Messrs are delegated by the Merchants of this City to apply a sum of Money which has been raised by subscription to the relief of the Marine Prisoners in New York belonging to the Port of Philad. They are directed to consult you upon the most proper and efficacious mode of answering the benevolent intentions of the subscribers—The Gentlemen do not propose going themselves into New York—The...
I enclose to you, an Extract of a Letter of the 7th Inst. from Sir Henry Clinton, by which it appears, he had for certain reasons, thought proper to nominate different Persons for Commissioners from those he had first named; & that, he wished to postpone the time of the meeting untill the 10th of April; I have written to him respecting the inconveniences which will be occasiond by delaying the...
Your favor of the 16th reached me last Evening. I do not see that any alteration is necessary in your instructions relating to Mr Laurens—From what we yet know, he is not at liberty to leave England and therefore as much a prisoner in fact as before the extension of his limits. I am with great Regard Gentn Yr most obt servt DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I received last Evening at this place, your favor of the 22d with the several Enclosures—it gives me satisfaction to find that you are so soon to proceed upon the business of your commission; in the mean time, I propose being at Morris Town on the 26 Inst. where I shall probably have the pleasure of seeing you—I am Gentlemen. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I have had intimations, that under the idea of the cessation of Hostilities within certain limits, a number of People intend to come over from New York to our Lines—to prevent all intercourse of this kind is the principal design of this Letter—Sir Wm Howe on a former occasion proposed that a neutrality should take place to a certain distance from the spot where our Commissioners were to...
Your favor of yesterday’s date came to my hands just as I was leaving Mr Lots house; your Messenger came on with me to be the bearer of this. Altho the information I had recd & communicated in my Letter of the 28th that a number of people intended coming over from the Enemy’s Lines under the idea of the cessation of hostilities, might not be well founded when it is understood of characters...
I have been favored with your Letter of the 16th of April by General Forman. Convinced, from the state of facts which has been exhibited to me, that justice, expediency & necessity require satisfaction should be obtained for the Murder of Captain Huddy; I have in the first instance made a representation to Sir Henry Clinton & demanded that the Officer who commanded the Party, or if he was not...
It is with great pleasure, I make use of the earliest occasion to acknowledge the receipt of your several Dispatches, by Colonel Smith, which contain an ample account of your Proceedings in consequence of the Commission you were charged with, by me. I have also received from Sir Henry Clinton an abstract of the same negociations as stated by his Commissioners. From the whole aspect of the...
General Washington’s compliments to Mr Governr Morris. If Mr Morris should have postponed his report, respecting the business entrusted to him by Mrs Lloyd, ’till information could be had from hence, of the conveyance of her Packet to Mr White; the General prays him to present his compliments with it, and assure her, that the packet went by a returng Flag in less than 24 hours after it came to...
Your letter for Mr Elliott, went into New York a few days since by the Comy of Prisoners, who is now there. The Packet for Genl Dalrymple shall also go there; altho’ the Genl, by this time, may be in England. Genl Knox has Skinners Letter—Mrs Washington set out this day for Virginia by an upper Road—present me in the most acceptable manner to Mrs Morris & Miss Kitty Livingston—I do not forget...
I asserted pretty roundly to you, but not more confidently than it was asserted to me, that General Dalrymple had Sailed for England. Since my return to this place I have seen a letter from him to Genl Knox which, at the same time that it contradicts both assertions, announces his speedy departure for the Albion shore. If he should remain in New York after this, charge it to his acct—not...
Congress having again directed me to propose to the British Commander in Cheif at New York the appointment of Commissioners to settle forthwith a General Cartel for the exchange of prisoners—taking care that the Liquidation of accounts and settlement of the Balance due for the maintanance of prisoners be provided for therein—I have this day communicated their resolution to Sir Guy Carleton and...
I wrote on the 2nd instant to Mr R. Morris and requested that the accounts relative to the subsistence of Prisoners might be collected and forwarded—General Knox has since desired me to write to you for those particularly which were in the possession of yourself and him upon the prison Commission, and for the Calculations made by you at Boonetown of the probable Balance due America with any...