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Documents filtered by: Recipient="McDougall, Alexander" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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I received your favor upon the Subject of Rations and agreable to your request have Inclosed a List of Rations allowed the Officers of the Regiments before Boston —those in service the 1st of July have been allowed from that time, Others appointed to Office since, from the dates of their Commissions. Having never given any direction about the Officers alluded to, or any Others except those...
Letter not found: to Brigadier General Alexander McDougall, 9 Aug. 1776. In his letter to GW of 12 Aug. , McDougall refers to “your Excellencys favor of the 9th.”
I am this Evening favoured with yours of the 19th from Chatham. I not only approve of the disposition you made of the three Regiments under Colo. Vose, because I think it was a very judicious one, but I had, previous to the Receit of your Letter, determined upon exactly the same plan, and had sent Orders to Colo. Vose to halt at Morris Town, that he might afford protection to the well affected...
I have yours of the 22d and am sorry that Affairs bore so bad an Aspect in your Quarter at that time. But I hope that the late Success at Trenton on the 26th and the Consequences of it, will change the face of Matters not only there but every where else. I crossed over to Jersey the Evening of the 25th about 9 Miles above Trenton with upwards of 2000 Men and attacked three Regiments of...
Letter not found: to Brigadier General Alexander McDougall, 1 Jan. 1777. The Paul C. Richards catalog no. 19, item 455, 1968, quoted the following from the LS : “I have the pleasure to inform you that your sons parole has been sent out to me, amongst others, who are exchanged for officers I have sent in to General Howe. General Maxwell has the proper orders for encouraging the Militia, to come...
General Schuyler having wrote in a pressing and urgent manner for a General Officer to be sent to the Northern department, I inclose you open, a Letter for Brigadr James Clinton, which you will forward to him after sealing it, provided in your opinion his services can be dispensed with where he now is. This I immagine will in a great measure depend on the State of health you are in; If you are...
Letter not found: to Brig. Gen. Alexander McDougall, 18 Feb. 1777. McDougall writes GW on 7 Mar . that “I was honored with your favor of the 18th Ultimo.”
I am glad to find by yours of the 16th that your Health is sufficiently re-established to enable you to do your duty. Considering the great dependance which we shall be under the necessity of putting upon Militia for a while longer, we certainly ought not to remove a General Officer from a post, to which, he can, by his influence, draw them when they are wanted. Upon this principle, you were...
I have to desire, that you will immediately procure and send me exact returns of all the troops belonging to your state, except those which are gone to Tionderoga; and that you will have them assembled with the utmost expedition at Peeks-Kills, there to hold themselves in perfect readiness to march at a moment’s warning. I must, also request, you will make a point of informing me, from time to...
I this evening received the favour of your letter of the 12th instant. The order you gave for such part of Ganservorts regiment as was at Fish-kills to repair to Fort Constitution, I approve of, as also you[r] determination respecting DuBois’s to remain at Fort Montgomery. They may be drawn from these places, when requisite, with the same expedition and ease as from Peeks-kills. The meaning...
When speaking of your Son, I was just now informed, that he had not been provided for in the late appointments of Officers in your State, being under parole when they were made. The part he early took in the Contest & his sufferings for it, would not be rewarded, was he to be neglected; I therefore wish, if he inclines to continue in service, that he may be appointed to the command of One of...
The late collection of Waggons, by the Enemy, upon Long and Staten Islands, some of which are already brought over to Amboy, plainly indicate a Move, whenever the State of the Roads will permit. Several accounts, by Deserters and others, also agree, that Materials have been brought from New York for constructing a floating Bridge, which can be for no other purpose than laying across the...
I am much surprised at never having received any regular account from you, of the late Affair at peekskill. I am yet intirely at a loss to know the Quantity, Quality or Value of the Stores that were lost. A Captain of a Tobacco Ship taken and carried into New York, left that place on Saturday last, he informs that three thousand Men were embarked and laying on Board Transports at Staten...
Yours of the 29th Ulto was delivered to me Yesterday by Mr Laurence. The loss we have sustained in Commissary’s and Quarter Masters Stores is to be regretted, as they are most useful to the Army and not to be replaced at this time, the Commissary’s particularly. I had repeatedly guarded him against suffering any large quantities laying near the Water in such places as were accessible to the...
Inclosed you have an Information which was given in Yesterday, by a Man who was in Newyork on Monday last, & which from a variety of Circumstances, I believe to be in a great measure true; therefore transmit it to you, that you may be prepar’d in case their Destination should be up North River, which at this time is not generally expect’d—I could wish you would give a Copy of this to Genl...
Your favor of the 12th Instt was delivered me last night by Mr Trumbull. I am much surprized to hear, that the innoculation of the Troops had been countermanded, or the least Hint suggested of the sort. I have never done or said anything countenancing such a measure, on the Contrary, I have pressed & urged the necessity of it in every instance, and I must request, that not a Moment may be...
Just after I had wrote very fully to you this Morning I recd yours of the 17th. By the inclosed Resolutions of Congress, which came to hand this day, and which are additions and Amendments to the former Articles of War, you will find that every Continental General has a right to carry the Sentence of a General Court Martial into execution in the State in which he commands. And I shall esteem...
The following are Extracts of Letters which I have just received from Genl Stephen, and are taken from the information of persons sent into New York and Bruswic. New Ark 22d April 1777. By a person to be depended upon, who left New York Yesterday—A Brigade consisting of the 15th & 17th (not exceeding 700 Men) and he believes the 36th & 4th embarked the 20th at night, and he supposes sailed up...
Yours of yesterday came to hand late last Night. As I have heard nothing further of the Troops that embarked on the 20th I can only recommend it to you to keep a vigilant look out for them. The detatchments that are to come on need not bring Camp Kettles with them, if they are wanted with you, as we have a sufficiency here. I am so well convinced of the Justice of your Remark upon the...
I received your favour of yesterday this Moment. In my Opinion it is by no means improbable that the Enemy may aim at another descent upon the Country adjoining the North River; or if they are disappointed in their first design by your late additional strength, they may continue in the River in order to divert our Attention from their real attempt upon Philadelphia: during which Continuance...
At three OClock this morning, I received your favor of the 27th. The intelligence it contains, is interesting and truly distressing. By this time, I fear, the Enemy have effected their purpose and destroyed all the Stores at Danbury; I wish those at Fredericksburg may not have shared the same fate. After accomplishing this enterprize, it is probable they will return to their Ships with...
I last night received your Letter of the 29th Ulto, with its several inclosures. I regret much, that the Enemy should have accomplished their Scheme with so little loss on their part; but I confess, I feared, that it would be the case, and that their retreat would be effected before a sufficient force could be assembled, to cut them off, or to give ’em any great annoyance. I wish you to...
The necessity of having regular Magazines of Provision for subsisting the Army, wheresoever It may act, and the late destruction of the Stores at Danbury, have induced Congress to take the matter into consideration & to come into the Resolves which accompany this. By these you will perceive, that One object of their deliberation was, to have immediate measures taken for the removal of the...
Your detention of apart of Capt. Sewards Company of Artillery, for the reasons you assign, is intirely agreeable to me; and you will observe the same rule with respect to others which shall be coming on in the same circumstances. I should be glad to hear such further particulars of the Danbury expedition, as may have come to your knowlege, that bear the marks of authenticity. I am Dear Sir...
I must beg the favour of you to look out for a sensible, honest, active, young fellow, well acquainted with Figures, & well qualified to discharge the duties of a Deputy Muster Master—His pay is low, 35 dollars ⅌ Month—On discovering such an one, you will be pleased to appoint him, & refer him to the Letter &C. from Colo. Ward that attend this. I am Dear Sir Yr most Obed. Servt P.S. I wish to...
I am favd with yours of the 5th: You make mention of a letter of Colo. Huntingdons of the 1st instant which you have not inclosed, there are a few lines from him of the 30th April, but they only respect a peice of intelligence of the Enemy’s having landed at Frogs point on their way down the Sound. I have a long time seen and felt the ill Consequences of the want of Arrangement in the...
So little room is left for doubting the Enemy’s designs are up the North River, that (notwithstanding proper Preparations for such an Event have been the frequent Subject of my Letters to you, which I am assured will claim a just share of your serious Attention) I can not help writing again on this head—Let me therefore, in order that no Measure for Defence may be left untried, desire you to...
This will be delivered you by Major General Green. He and General Knox are sent by me to review the posts under your command, and their appendages; and to give their advice and assistance towards putting every thing in the most defensible state possible. The vast importance of these posts and the great probability that the enemy will direct their operations against them make me anxious for...
I was a few days ago favd with yours of the 6th: I cannot account for the Massachusets Troops coming on without Cloathing, in any other manner, than, that as they were all originally intended for Ticonderoga, their Cloaths may have been sent to Albany. If that is the Case, the Qr Masters should be immediately sent to bring them back, if it is not, they must certainly look to the State, because...
I this day received your favor of the 19th. General putnam being thus far in his way to peeks Kills, and fully instructed upon most of the matters contained in your Letter, makes it unnecessary for me, to answer it so particularly, as I otherwise should have done; and as I wish to refer you to those instructions for my Sentiments & Ideas upon the Subjects of it. I shall observe However, that...
I, yesterday, had the pleasure of your’s of the 21st instant. I wish every Gentleman in the army could appeal to his own heart and find the same principles of conduct, which, I am persuaded activate you; we should experience more consistency, zeal and steadiness, than we do, in but too many instances. A disinterested attachment to the cause, we are ingaged in, can alone produce that line of...
I last night received your favor of the 29th. Your Conjectures, respecting the Troops arrived, correspond with my own. I shall not be disappointed, if they are those, which were in Canada, having long thought, there was a probability of their coming to reinforce Genl Howe. I am much surprized, that more of the Connecticut Troops, have not reached Pecks Kill. I have repeatedly & in most...
The Enemy decamped, the night before last, & have returned to their former position from Amboy to Brunswick. This appears to have been in consequence of a sudden resolution, as they had been employ’d in raising a chain of redoubts from Sommerset to Brunswick; which they wou’d not have done, had they at first intended to abandon their new Ground in so short a time. What may have determined them...
General Putnam’s orders to you to return to Peeks Kill was founded upon a misapprehension of my orders; which required your halting at Pompton, as you were there at a considerable distance from Peeks Kill. But from the late change of circumstances, with respect to the enemy, your countermarch has not happened amiss. It is now pretty evident they are leaving the Jersies, and probably they may...
By an Express this moment arrived from Cape May, The Enemy’s Fleet left Yesterday Morning at Eight OClock—put to Sea and were out of Sight Three Hours when the Express came away. I do not know whether you are coming on with the Two Brigades ordered from peeks Kill to reinforce this Army—If you are, I beg that you will leave the Brigades under the direction of the next commanding Officer to...
Your favour of the 20th Instt came to my hands last Night by Mr P. —I thank you for sending him to me, as I think many valuable advantages may result from his endeavours to serve us. He seems sensible & willing, & I trust will be faithful—I have given him such Instructions respecting his conduct as my hurried Situation will allow. to Mr P. I shall refer for the Acct of things in this Quarter...
I have just reciev’d the inclosed information from General Dickinson through Congress, and in consequence, desire that you will, if the Enemy should appear in force and have more in view than to plunder and distress the Country, join Genl Dickinson with the detachment under your command and give every opposition to the Enemy in their march through the Jersey’s you possibly can. The public...
The exigency of our affairs makes it necessary, you should use all the diligence and dispatch in your power to join this army, with the troops under your command. The enemy are making the most vigorous efforts to succeed in their attempt upon Philadel: and it will require our utmost exertions to disappoint them. We shall this day cross the Schulkill at Parkers ford about thirty miles from...
I wrote you on Friday last requesting your earliest arrival with the Troops under your command to join me. This I must repeat, and have sent an Officer on purpose to deliver my Letter, to whom I refer you for the particulars of our Situation & that of the Enemy at this Time. I shall only observe respecting them, that the main body of their Army lay last night, near French Creek Bridge about...
I am pleased to find by yours from Coryells Ferry that you are so near me. The Army will fall down to Night to a well known place called the Trap 24 Miles from Philada. Tomorrow we shall proceed further down towards Philada. I am Dear Sir Yr most obt Servt LS , in Tench Tilghman’s writing, owned (1997) by Mr. Joseph Rubinfine, West Palm Beach, Florida. The letter is addressed: “To Brigr Genl...
Since writing to you this morning, it has been determined in consequence of farther intelligence that it will be more adviseable to remain on the ground which we occupy at present, than to march to the Trap as was at first intended—you will therefore regulate your movements accordingly. I am Sir Your most Obedt Servt LS , in Caleb Gibbs’s writing, NHi : McDougall Papers. GW franked the...
Since I have seen Captn Faulkner, and learnt your Situation from him, & compar’d it with that of the Enemy, I have become exceedingly uneasy least they should attempt to Interrupt your March, which I think they can, and surely will do, if they have any good advice of your approach —& of this I have no doubt, as we are in a most disaffected Country. I have therefore, notwithstanding the two...
I was favoured with Yours by the Bearer of this. I wish you to proceed with your Detachment to the best Grounds near Markleys, about Two Miles below Pennibeckers Mill on the Skippack Road & there remain for further Orders. From the present view of things, I think, I shall join you there or somewhere near It, with this Army. Mr Thomas, who has this in charge, says he is well acquainted with the...
Letter not found: to Brig. Gen. Alexander McDougall, c.23 Oct. 1777. Joseph Reed refers in his letter to GW of 23 Oct. to “a Letter Genl McDougal received from your Excelly this Afternoon.”
The Congress, so long ago as the 30th November last, directed me to have an enquiry into the Causes of the losses of Fort Mifflin upon the Delaware, and Fort Montgomery upon Hudsons River—The peculiar Situation of the Army has hindered me from attending to this matter before this time. As most of the principal Officers, up the North River, were immediately concerned in the defence of Fort...
I was favd with yours of the 17th ulto in due time, and should have proceeded immediately upon the business of the enquiry had not General Putnam’s private Affairs required his Absence for some little time : I have appointed Brigr Genl Huntingdon and Colonel Wigglesworth to assist you in this matter and inclosed you will find instructions empowering you, in conjunction with them, to carry on...
This will be delivered to you by Colonel de la Radiere of the Corps of Engineers, who was employed to superintend the fortifications on the North River—but from some misunderstanding between him and the late commanding Officer, in which he thought his own honour and the public interest were committed, he determined to renounce the work, and return to Camp —I can safely recommend him to you as...
I hope this will find you arrived at your quarters upon the North River. By advices recd two days ago from Elizabeth Town I am informed that two Regiments of British and two of Hessians were embarked at New York and by accounts from Rhode Island it was imagined that the Enemy were about evacuating New Port. This makes me suspicious that General Howe is drawing his reinforcements together to...
I opened the inclosed to take out the letter for the commanding Officer at Albany, having an opportunity of sending it immediately there by Colo. Armand. I forgot to desire you to give orders to the drivers of all Cattle and to the conductors of all cloathing and Stores coming from the Eastward to cross the Delaware at Easton and not come down as low as Sherrards or Correyels ferry as usual....
That part of the Troops of New York have left that place, admits of no doubt—the accounts of their number differ—some say four Regiments (two British and two Hessian)—some 2300, and others 2500 men—all of which there is reason to believe are arrived at Philadelphia; as a Fleet consisting of near 50 Transports (the same number that left New York) passed Wilmington about five days ago. By...