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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
Results 301-324 of 324 sorted by editorial placement
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Yr. dispatch by express to the Executive will no doubt produce Essential Service to yr. constituents, in wresting ⟨our Merchts’s⟩ Staple from the grasping hands of Speculators, ⟨Many⟩ of ⟨whom,⟩ I am told were hunting it. It added to the weight of my debt too, in conveying me yr. Solacing favr. of the 13th. inclosing the British King’s Speech to Parliament, full of Peace & the Sentiments of a...
I am from hence to ⟨acknowled⟩ge the receipt of yr. two favrs. of the 8th. & since, the latter conveying the Official Authentication of the Account of peace, about which people began to entertain doubts, much encouraged by the Speculators—it is now fix’d, and we must turn Our thoughts to the realising it’s benefits. I find people here objecting to the Impost upon the score of danger from too...
I assure you that neither my health nor punctuality were tardy in the disappt. you mention in yr. favr. of the 17th. —but either the Post Office or some impertinent Curiosity by the way, intercepting my letter of the 9th., wch. I wrote, and put into the usual course; however you will have abundant proofs that the loss was probably small. If the troops were not furlough’d without Mutinous...
I have your favr. Of the 30th., that of the preceeding date hath not yet come to hand; an unexpected call from home last Post day prevented my paying you my respects then, so that you will miss that Lre. I am sorry to hear of the Insult offer’d to Congress, and the more so for the little respect shewn to their dignity by the Executive of Pennsylvania; even poor dispised Virga. I think would...
With yr. last favr. of the 8th. Instt. came the missing one of June 24th. containing the Account of the behavr. of the soldiers in their insult to Congress. I wish the conspiracy may be traced to it’s real source, and the motives truly investigated, when I still think it will not terminate in public good, or the redress of real Injury in the Army; the Citizens I suppose cannot be well pleased...
In acknowledging the rect. of yr. favr. of the 15th., I must as usual be very unentertaining in our total dearth of Interesting intelligence, whether foreign or domestic, all I can say of the latter kind is, that we have a very dry Season, wch., at this critical juncture, threatens a disappointment in the fair prospect we lately had of plentiful Crops of all kinds, which however bountiful...
I thank you for the Sentiment wch. Suggested yr. favr. of the 21st. past, and for emploing a moment of unexpected liesure in the P. S. We have Now two contrary reports respecting Peace, neither of them much worthy of credit, The one that the definitive treaty is arrived, the other that the British Army are intrenching afresh in N. York, and every movement indicates intentions Opposite to that...
Yr. favr. of the 29th. past has raised my expectation of receiving by yr. next a confirmation of the Arrival of the definitive treaty, & I hope in consequence, a more prompt evacuation of New York, than Carlton has hitherto shewn a disposition for. I wish them gone if it was only to preserve our people from Mercant[i]le impositions, founded on doubts that the War is not over. Nay it was only...
Yr. favr. of the 5th. was not fraught with a confirmation of the definitive treaty’s Arrival as I expected; however as I do not discover it to be the Interest of any of the powers concerned, to stop a Peace, I still flatter my self the delay is produced rather by some adjustment of forms than real contentions wch. may endanger the final ratification of the Preliminaries; I wish Carlton was...
Your favr. of the 12th. casts a Slur upon that of July 21st. very unmerited, as that & every other containing any Political Sentiment, however hastily written, deserve more Attention than I have paid to them. I feel the strongest conviction that we never differed in the end of our pursuits, the pure public good, untainted or corroded by any selfish views, however our sentiments may differ as...
From yr. favr. of the 19th. past, I find Congress have at length negated a return to Philada., I am sorry the question was brought on in a manner not quite honourable, because every proceeding of that sort lessens the dignity of Congress, & gives a Precedent for Chicane, wch. increases jealousy & danger in our great Council. It is now reported that you have fix’d on Annapolis for your...
With my letter to the President I inclose a copy of the bill for calling in the paper money now in circulation, being the only copy I have been able to get. In my letter to the delegates I ask the favor of them to furnish me with authentic advice when the resolutions of Congress shall have been adopted by five other states. In a private letter I may venture to urge great dispatch and to assign...
I beg leave to introduce to your acquaintance the bearer Mr. Short who comes to Philadelphia in hopes of being able to prosecute in greater quiet there than he can here the studies in which he is engaged: and I chearfully add to what you may already have heard of him my testimony of his genius, learning and merit. I do this the rather as it gives me an opportunity of saving the right of...
I have received from you two several favours on the subject of the designs against the territorial rights of Virginia . I never before could comprehend on what principle our right to the Western country could be denied which would not at the same time subvert the rights of all the states to the whole of their territory. What objections may be founded on the Charter of N. York I cannot say,...
Your favour by Colo. Basset is not yet come to hand. The intimation through the Attorney I received the day before Colo. Bland’s arrival by whom I am honoured with your’s of the 14th inst. It finds me at this place attending my family under inoculation. This will of course retard those arrangements of my domestic affairs which will of themselves take time and cannot be made but at home. I...
A gentleman returning from this place to Philadelphia gives me an opportunity of sending you a line. We reached Newport the evening of the day on which we left you. There we were misled by an assurance that the lower ferry could not be crossed. We therefore directed our course for the Bald friar’s: and thence to another ferry 6 miles above. Between these two we lost two days, in the most...
I write by this post to the Minister of foreign affairs, but will repeat to you the facts mentioned to him and some others improper for a public letter, and some reflections on them which can only be hazarded to the ear of friendship. The cold weather having set in the evening of the 30th. Ult. (being the same in which I arrived here) the Chevalr. de Ville-brun was obliged to fall down with...
Patsy putting the inclosed into my hands obliges me to make a separate letter of it, that while I give it the protection of your address I may yet pay it’s postage. I suspect by the superscription (which I saw before Majr. Franks amended it) and by what I know of Patsy’s hierogliphical writing that Miss Polly must get an interpreter from Egypt. Be so good as to remind the ladies and gentlemen...
Yours of the 11th. came to hand last night. From what you mention in your letter I suppose the newspapers must be wrong when they say that Mr. Adams, had taken up his abode with Dr. Franklin. I am nearly at a loss to judge how he will act in the negotiation. He hates Franklin, he hates Jay, he hates the French, he hates the English. To whom will he adhere? His vanity is a lineament in his...
Meeting at our quarters with a Mr. Levi going to Philadelphia and having no other employment, I write by him just to say that all is well, and that having made our stages regularly and in time we hope to make better way than Mr. Nash did. The Carolina letter bearer is here also. We pass one another two or three times a day. I never saw Mr. Ingles to speak to him about my books. Will you be so...
I received your favor of Apr. 22. and am not a little concerned at the alterations which took place in the Report on the impost &c. after I left you. The article which bound the whole together I fear was essential to get the whole passed; as that which proposed the conversion of state into federal debts was one palatable ingredient at least in the pill we were to swallow. This proposition...
The receipt of your letter of May 6. remains unacknoleged. I am also told that Colo. Monroe has letters for me by post tho’ I have not yet received them. I hear but little from our assembly. Mr. Henry has declared in favour of the impost. This will ensure it. How he is as to the other questions of importance I do not learn. On opening my papers when I came home I found among them the inclosed...
Your favours of the 13th. and 20th. Ult. came to hand about a week ago. I am informed the assembly determined against the capacity of reelection in those gentlemen of the delegation who could not serve a complete year. I do not know on what this decision could be founded. My hopes of the success of the Congressional propositions here have lessened exceedingly. Mr. Henry had declared in favor...
Your favor of July 17. which came to hand long ago remains still unacknoleged, as from the time of it’s receipt I had constant hope that you would be on the road for Virginia before an answer could reach you. That of the 11th. inst. I received yesterday, and leaves the time of your visit as unfixed as ever, and excites some fear that I shall miss of you. I propose to set out for Congress about...