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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Laurens, Henry" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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I have the Honour to inclose to Congress, the latest Gazettes. We have no other Intelligence than is contained in them. Since the 11. July the Date of Lord Howes Letter, announcing the Arrival of the Compte D’Estaing off Sandy Hook, We have not a syllable from America by Way of England. In France We have nothing from America Since 3 July. This long Interval leaves a vast Scope for Imagination...
I have the Honour to inform Congress, of my Safe Arrival in this City in the Frigate Boston after a most dangerous, and distressing Voyage of Six Weeks and four Days. The Situation of Things in Europe is so critical, at this Moment that, notwithstanding I am exhausted with the Fatigues of the Voyage, I am determined to proceed, the Day after Tomorrow, on my Journey to Paris. By all that I...
I had this Moment the Honour of yours of the 15. Ultimo and I thank you for your Kindness to Mr. Thaxter of whom I had not before heard, Since he left this Place. The Act of Congress inclosed in your Letter, I will take with me to Europe, for which Country I hope to embark in five Days in the Boston Frigate, not without Regret at having been delayed So long. I shall make out Six Copies of the...
Having been Absent, on a Journey, I had not the Honour of receiving your Letters, until Yesterday when one of the Twenty Eighth of November inclosing a Resolution of Congress of the Same Day, and another of the third of December inclosing a Commission for Dr Franklin Dr Lee and Myself to represent the United States at the Court of France, were delivered to me in Boston. As I am deeply...
M r Storer arrived Yesterday with your kind Letter of 6 March, with its Inclosure. I know not what to Say to the Subject of this Inclosure. it is a Mystery which Time will unriddle and to time I leave it, So entirely that I dont think it necessary to Say any Thing to our Colleague about it. Appearances, on the Side where you are, dont please me more than you. But I hope the Weather will soon...
I have the Honour to inclose, the latest Gazettes, which contain all the News of Europe. The News from America by the Way of London, which is contained in the Courier de L’Europe of the fifteenth instant, has raised our Expectations and encreased our Anxiety. We are not without Apprehensions that the Compte D’Estaing, may fall in with the combined Fleets of How and Biron. The English are...
I had the Pleasure of a very agreable private Letter from you, while in Paris, which I answerd, having executed your Orders, as soon as received. Whether you received my Answer I dont know. I have had a Stormy Voyage, but not more so than the Scaene you have been in, at Land. I wish I may have escaped with as much Hon­ our, as you have done: but have little Reason to believe it, for I can...
I have the Honour to inclose to Congress a few of the public Papers, which contain all the News that is passing. As it is uncertain by what Vessell the Gentleman will go who takes this, the Conveyance is too precarious, to send any Thing which ought not to be known to the Enemy. We are waiting with an impatient Anxiety, to hear from America, the last Accounts from thence having been brought by...
I have the Honour to inclose to congress, all the News Papers, I have by me. Enough to shew that We have nothing very important here, at present. The French and British Fleets are again at Sea and We hourly expect Intelligence of a Second Battle. But our Expectations from America are still more interesting and anxious, having nothing from thence, since the 3d of July, except what is contained...
I thank you, my dear sir for your kind Congratulations, on the favourable Appearances in our American Concerns, and for so politely particularising one of the most inconsiderable of them, my Safe Arrival in France, which was after a very inconvenient Passage of forty five days. Your Letter to Mr. Izzard, I had the Pleasure to send to him immediately, in Paris, where he resides, the Court of...