You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Lafayette …
  • Period

    • Revolutionary War

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 8

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Lafayette, Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
Results 1-30 of 163 sorted by recipient
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I am apprehensive that neither the fixed pickets for the security of the Army, nor the duties of the patrolls are sufficiently established. You will therefore be pleased to have a meeting for the purpose of taking the matter into consideration, and making such regulations, as will at the same time contribute to safety and to the ease of the duty, by dividing it between the Infantry and the...
I have received your favor dated at half past four this afternoon, and must refer you to my Letter written about two Hours ago which in effect supersedes the necessity of a particular answer on the points contained in your present one. You will see by that, you are to move to Englishtown, after which it may be in our power to give you countenance & support in case of an Attack, or to cover...
I had the pleasure of receiving last night your Letter of the 3d instant and of learning your arrival at the Head of Elk three Days sooner than General Washington had given us reason to expect. In the mean Time I hope you will have received my answer to your first Letter which I forwarded by Express to the Head of Elk and which is of greater Importance a Letter from Baron Steuben, who commands...
I cannot suffer Colo. Gemat to leave this City—for France—without a remembrancer from me, to you. I have remained at this place ever since you left it, and am happy in having discovered the best disposition imaginable in Congress to prepare vigorously for another Campaign. They have resolved to keep up the same number of Corps, as constituted the Army of last year and have urged the States...
Your two letters of the 10th came to hand last Night—In mine of the 11th I informed you as fully as it was prudent to do upon paper, that there was at present little or no prospect of an operation in the quarter you seem to wish—The Contingencies appeared to me so remote in the Conversations I had with Count Rochambeau that I could not justify myself in withdrawing a detachment already so far...
I received your two obliging favors of the 26th just as I was commencing yesterday, our second day’s march for the North River. There is no doubt that Sir Herny Clinton means to attack the Count de Rochambeau, and that a considerable force has sailed for the purpose, of which, you will have the greatest certainty by the time this reaches you. I am happy in the measures which have been taken...
You are to have the immediate command of that detatchment from this Army which consists of Glovers and Varnums Brigades and the detatchment under the command of Colo. Henry Jackson. You are to march them with all convenient expedition and by the best Routs to Providence in the State of Rhode Island—When there, you are to subject yourself to the orders of Major Genl Sullivan who will have the...
New Windsor [ New York ] April 22, 1781 . Is disturbed by the “temper of” Lafayette’s “detachment and the desertions.” Discusses southern situation and the “proposed attempt on New York.” Df , in writings of H and George Washington, George Washington Papers Library of Congress.
The House of Delegates and so many of the Senate as were here having reason to believe that Genl. Morgan might probably have it in his power to raise a number of volunteers to join in our present defence, have come to a Resolution of which I do myself the honor of inclosing you a Copy. I have transmitted it to him also. Should you find it not inconsistent with any orders under which he may be...
The General is very anxious to hear from you and that your corps should join the army. Your men must have suffered exceedingly yesterday and last night, and your baggage is here. Be with us as soon as you can; but send the express back immediately with an account of your success. Yrs. Affectionately ADfS , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Lafayette was on a reconnaissance in the...
This Letter will be delivered to you by Monsr Laneville, to whom, I have no doubt, you will shew civility, as he appears to me to be a Gentn of sense & science. I hope, however, he will come too late to afford you any aid—I say so, because I could wish he may find the work already done, of which, I have some hope from Genl Sullivans last Letter. I have lately received a horse for you from...
ALS (draft) and copy: Library of Congress I have just now received your Favour of the 17th. I wrote to you a Day or two ago, and have little to add. You ask my Opinion what Conduct the English will probably hold on this Occasion, & whether they will not rather propose a Negotiation for a Peace: I have but one Rule to go by in devining of those People, which is, that whatever is prudent for...
It is General duPortails desire that Colo. Gouvion may return to him. Independant of the occasion which there may be for him here, there is another reason which operates against his going with you, it is, that he would interfere with Colo. Kosciusko who has been considered as the commanding Engineer with the southern Army. I am with very great Regard Dear Marquis Yr &c. DLC : Papers of George...
Whilst I thought there was a probability of my letters finding you in France I continued to write to you at Paris—after that, I ceased to do so, expecting the more agreeable pleasure of embracing you in America—Your favor of the 29th of June, placing the time of your departure from thence on a contingency, and our latest advices from Europe, reporting that the Negociations for Peace were...
I have recd your favors of the 23d from Pompton by Capt. Castaign—You may make yourself perfectly easy as to ships of the line being at New York—the Iris and the others mentioned by Hagarty are Frigates—This Man relates a circumstance to me that he does not seem to have informed you of—it is, that a reinforcement of six hundred Men is preparing for Arnold—and that the Convoy is to be the...
I have the pleasure of receiving in your letter of the 20th. Genl. Washington’s of Dec. 8th. What you left beyond and what come to on this side the Atlantic, the services you have rendered there, and those you render here, your personal worth and Genl. Washington’s esteem for you, leave no room for addition to the measure of respect and gratitude we owe you. I beg leave also through you to...
Though the situation of Southern affairs would not permit me to recall your corps to this army, yet it was with great reluctance I could resolve upon seeing you separated from Head Quarters—My friendship for you makes me desirous of having you near me, and there will occur frequent occasions in cooperative measures in which it would be of the greatest utility I should have it in my power to...
The inclosed is a Copy of a Letter which was intended to have awaited you in Virginia. But as there seems to be a probability that you will be detained at the Head of Elk longer than you could have expected, I have thought it best to send a Copy there also. An Idea having unfortunately got abroad that the militia now called on are intended to storm the Enemy’s works at Portsmouth, the numbers...
It is easier for you to conceive than for me to express the sensibility of my Heart at the communications in your letter of the 5th of Feby from Cadiz. It is to these communications we are indebted for the only acct yet recd of a general Pacification. My mind upon the receipt of this news was instantly assailed by a thousand ideas, all of them contending for pre-eminence, but believe me my...
The Conversation with which you honoured me last Evening, has induced me, to give you the Trouble of this Letter upon the same subject. It is certain that a Loan of Money, is very much wanted, to redeem the Redundancy of our Paper Bills, and without it, it is impossible to foresee what will be the Consequence to their Credit, and therefore every service that may be rendered, in order to obtain...
Not till the 5th My dear Marqs was I able to leave York—providing for the detachment that was to go Southerly—Embarking the Troops that were to go Northerly—making a distribution of the Ordnances & stores for various purposes—and disposing of the Officers and other prisoners to their respective places of destination would not admit of my leaving that part of the Country sooner. On that day I...
White Plains [ New York ] July 27, 1778 . Introduces Major General Nathanael Greene who is to cooperate with Lafayette in campaign against Rhode Island. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
AL (draft): American Philosophical Society; copy: Library of Congress I admire much the Activity of your Genius, and the strong Desire you have of being continually employ’d against our Common Enemy. It is certain that the Coasts of England & Scotland are extreamly open & defenceless. There are also many rich Towns near the Sea, which 4 or 5000 Men, landing unexpectedly, might easily surprize...
I have received your two letters of the 31st of July & 1st of August and approve the steps you have taken. I am sorry however to find that The Chevalier De Ternay is so averse to entering the harbour in case of superority. I believe he will find it impracticable without entering, effectually to interrupt supplies and blockade the enemy; and in my opinion, our principal chance of success is in...
The freedom of your communications is an evidence to me of the sincerety of your attachment—and every fresh instance of this gives pleasure & adds strength to the band which unite us in friendship. In this light I view the intimation contained in your letter of the 23d Ulto—from Alexandria—respecting the conduct of Mr Lund Washington. Some days previous to the receipt of your letter—which only...
I have the pleasure to inform you that the whole Fleet went out with a fair Wind this Evening about sun set. You may possibly hear of their arrival in Chesapeak before this letter reaches you– Should you not– You will have every thing prepared for falling down the Bay at a moments warning– We have not yet heard of any more of the British in Gardeners Bay– Should we luckily meet with no...
I had the pleasure yesterday to receive your favor of the 17th. inst. and am very happy that the Southern States are to have the Benefit of your Aid. On the 18th. inst. the enemy came from Portsmouth &c. (as in the following Letter to the President of Congress to the words Little River on the 11th.) We still consider his [Greene’s] as the interesting Scene of action to us. As long as we can...
The General is very anxious to hear from you and that your corps should join the army. Your men must have suffered exceedingly yesterday and last night, and your Baggage is here—Be with us as soon as you can; but send the express back immediately with an account of your success. Yrs Affectionately DLC : Papers of George Washington.
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 386. In this letter Franklin reports the most important British political development in the course of the peace negotiations, the replacement of Rockingham as prime minister by Shelburne. This permitted Shelburne to take full command of the negotiations....
New Windsor [ New York ] February 20, 1781 . Places Lafayette in command of detachment that is to act against enemy in Virginia. Sends detailed instructions for this command. Df , in writings of George Washington and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.