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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Lafayette, Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
Results 31-40 of 163 sorted by recipient
The inclosed are your Instructions, in the prosecution of wch if you should receive authentic intelligence of the Enemy’s having left Virginia—Or by adverse fortune the detachment from Monsr Destouches has lost its superiority in that State and disabled thereby to cooperate with you—You will return with the Detachment under your Command, as the enemy cannot be effected by it while they have...
I have successively received your favors of the 3d 7th 8th 9th 15th 23d 25th and 26th of last Month. You having been fully instructed as to your operations and I having nothing material to communicate, was the reason of my not answering them before—While we lament the miscarriage of enterprize which bid so fair for success, we must console ourselves in the thought of having done every thing...
We find on our arrival here, that the intelligence received on the road is true. The enemy have all filed off from Allen Town on the Monmouth road. Their rear is said to be a mile Westward of Lawrence Taylor’s Tavern, six miles from Allen Town. General Maxwell is at Hyde’s Town, abt. three miles from this place. General Dickinson is said to be on the enemy’s right flank, but where cannot be...
Colo. Senf handed me a list of entrenching tools and other necessaries for the operations against Portsmouth. Notwithstanding present appearances, I shall have them procured. I apprehend we shall be obliged to have many of them made at Fredericksburg. Mr. Walker delivered me your wish to have seamen procured for manning the armed vessels. I know of no method of effecting this but by draughting...
I have had the pleasure of receiving your favors of the 8th and 20th instants. The first releived me from much anxiety, as I had seen Mr Revingtons account of the Action at Green Spring, which you may suppose was highly coloured in their favor. I find by your last that neither my letter of the 29th of June or that of the 13th inst. had reached you—I cannot tell the dates of those previous as I...
I was two days ago honoured with your Letter and that of General Washington on the same Subject. I immediately transmitted by Express the one accompanying it to the Commanding Officer of the Naval Force of his Most Christian Majesty in our Bay, and took measures for providing pilots. Baron Steuben will communicate to you the Arrangements he proposes, which I shall have the pleasure of...
I inclosed to Genl. Phillips a passport for the British flag vessel the Genl. Riedesel and delivered it to Captn. Jones who called on me for that purpose by order of Major General Baron Steuben and was to have accompanied the vessel to and from her port of Destination. The movements of the enemy and uncertainty where Genl. Phillips was then to be found delayed his going till you had arrived. I...
On the 30th of last Month I wrote you a letter which in point of length, would almost extend from hence to Paris—It was to have been borne to you by Colo. Fleury, to whom the relation of some particulars was referred; but the advice of Count D’Estaings arrival at Georgia—& the hope given us by Congress of seeing him at New York has induced this Officer to suspend his voyage to go in pursuit of...
I have to acknowledge, the honor of your favors of the 14th & 24th of October and 4th of Decr; to thank you for the warm and affectionate expression of them; and to congratulate you & Madame La Fayette on the birth of a daughter—Virginia I am perswaded, will be pleased with the Compliment of the name; and I pray as a member of it she may live to be a blessing to her Parents. It would seem that...
I have just returned from Weathersfield at which I expected to have met with the Count de Rochambeau & Count de Barras, but the British fleet having made its appearance off Block Island, the Admiral did not think it prudent to leave New port. Count Rochambeau was only attended by Chevr Chattellux—Generals Knox and Duportail were with me. Upon a full consideration of our affairs in every point...