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    • Hamilton, Alexander
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    • Lafayette …
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Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Recipient="Lafayette, Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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The General is very anxious to hear from you and that your corps should join the army. Your men must have suffered exceedingly yesterday and last night, and your baggage is here. Be with us as soon as you can; but send the express back immediately with an account of your success. Yrs. Affectionately ADfS , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Lafayette was on a reconnaissance in the...
The General is very anxious to hear from you and that your corps should join the army. Your men must have suffered exceedingly yesterday and last night, and your Baggage is here—Be with us as soon as you can; but send the express back immediately with an account of your success. Yrs Affectionately DLC : Papers of George Washington.
We find on our arrival here, that the intelligence received on the road is true. The enemy have all filed off from Allen Town on the Monmouth road. Their rear is said to be a mile Westward of Lawrence Taylor’s Tavern, six miles from Allen Town. General Maxwell is at Hyde’s Town, abt. three miles from this place. General Dickinson is said to be on the enemy’s right flank, but where cannot be...
En effet ce servit les priver du Secours de leurs vaisseaux ou provisions au Continent et nous mettre à même de seconder efficacement vos opérations dans ces Parages en vous fournissant des provisions qui sont, je crois, l’Article le plus essential dont vous pouvez avoir besoin. L’éloignement de la Guerre de ce Païs est un objet très important pour les opérations générales de la Guerre. Il...
Since we parted My Dear Marquis at York Town I have received three letters from you one written on your way to Boston, two from France. I acknowlege that I have written to you only once, but the reason has been that I have been taught dayly to expect your return. This I should not have done from my own calculations; for I saw no prospect but of an inactive campaign, and you had much better be...
I have the honor to render you an account of the corps under my command in your attack of last night, upon the redoubt on the left of the enemy’s lines. Agreeable to your orders we advanced in two columns with unloaded arms, the right composed of Lt. Col Gimat’s batalion and my own commanded by Major Fish, the left of a detachment commanded by Lt Col Laurens, destined to take the enemy in...
We have just received advice from New York through different channels that the enemy are making an embarkation with which they menace the French fleet and army. Fifty transports are said to have gone up the Sound to take in troops and proceed directly to Rhode Island. The General is absent and may not return before evening. Though this may be only a demonstration yet as it may be serious, I...