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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Jay, John" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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ALS : William L. Clements Library; copies: Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives; press copy of copy: National Archives As the day is now fixed for the signatures of the Definitive treaties between Great Britain France and Spain I beg leave to inform you that I am ready to sign the Definitive treaty between Great Britain and the united States of America...
As I am informed that next Wednesday is appointed for the Signature of the definitive Treaties of Peace, I Suppose it will be thought proper to think of Some Conveyance of the Ratification of the Provisional Treaty, and of the Original of our definitive Treaty as Soon as it Shall be Signed To Congress. By what Vessell it will be proper to Send it, deserves to be considered as soon as possible,...
ALS : Columbia University Library; copy: Massachusetts Historical Society As I am informed that next Wednesday is appointed for the Signature of the definitive Treaties of Peace, I Suppose it will be thought proper to think of Some Conveyance of the Ratification of the Provisional Treaty, and of the Original of our definitive Treaty as Soon as it Shall be Signed to Congress. By what Vessell it...
Copies: Public Record Office, Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society August 12 and 13 were of far greater diplomatic consequence than this exchange of formal letters about the birth of an English princess (the present letter and the commissioners’ answer of the following day) would suggest. On Tuesday, August 12, at the weekly meeting of ministers at Versailles, Franklin and...
Though I have not performed my promise of writing to you, which I made you when you left this country, yet I have not the less interested myself in your welfare and success. I have been witness with pleasure to every event which has had a tendency to advance you in the esteem of your country; and I may assure you with sincerity, that it is as high as you could possibly wish. All have united in...
ALS : Massachusetts Historical Society Having Been Honoured With letters from Congress, it Becomes my duty to Consult You Upon a point Which they Have particularly Recommended— In the late preliminaries no time is Mentionned for the American Merchants paying their English debts— A Matter of Great Moment to our Merchants who Require at least three or four Years to Accomplish the Business— Upon...
Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society, Library of Congress Mr. F. submits it to the Consideration of Mr. Jay, whether it may not be adviseable to forbear, at present, the Justification of ourselves, respecting the Signature of the Preliminaries; because That matter is, at present, quiet here; No Letter sent to the Congress is ever kept secret; The Justification contains some Charges of...
Copy: National Archives As Congress have not yet elected any Minister for Foreign Affairs, and knowing the importance of your Being fully informed of every public transaction relative to these States, I have concluded that you would not think it amiss to hear from me on the subject of the removal of Congress to this place, tho’ I cannot consider this communication as official but merely for...
AL : Library of Congress Since at least March, when independence seemed assured, certain members of the diplomatic corps had wondered when Franklin would present his card, which would allow them to recognize him officially. Franklin explained that he would do no such thing until news of the ratification arrived. On July 2, prompted by Vergennes, the three American commissioners paid their...
Press copy of copy: American Philosophical Society; L (draft): Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères; copy: National Archives J’ai reçu, Messieurs, la Lettre que vous m’avez fait l’honneur de m’ecrire le 29 du Mois dernier et par laquelle vous demandez, au Nom des Etats Unis un Secours extraordinaire de 1900/m l.t. Le Roi se seroit fait un Plaisir, Messieurs, de prendre votre Demande...