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We have the honor to inclose for Your Excellency and the Council a copy of the resolutions communicated in our conference yesterday. Having then fully entered into all the explanations which were necessary on the subject, we shall not trouble your Excellency with a recapitulation. But as the object is of a delicate and important nature, we think it our duty to request the determination of the...
LS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania; AL (draft): American Philosophical Society M. Märter, Professor of Natural History in the Service of the Emperor, being appointed to make a Collection of Plants and Animals from the four Quarters of the World, for his Imperial Majesty’s Botanic Gardens and Menagerie, proposes to begin his Operations by a Journey thro’ the Countries under the Government...
LS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania; copy and press copy of LS : Library of Congress Permit me to congratulate your Excellency on your Advancement to the Presidency of Pennsylvania, wherein I hope you may find Opportunities of doing much good to your Country, the only Consideration that can make an elevated Situation agreable to a reasonable Mind. Mr Penn, Son of our late Proprietary,...
I am honored with your Excellenys Letter of the 29th January. Since I had the honor to write the late President respecting the Enemys having put a stop to the incursions of the Savages—I have Reced no intelligence but what has seemed to confirm the declarations the Enemy then made how long they will continue this inoffensive System or what may be their designs for next Spring—it is impossible...
The dispute of Territory between the States of Pennsylvania & Connecticut being now decided, and the frontiers remaining in a perfect State of tranquility; I cannot conceive any reason sufficient for continuing a body of Continental Troops any longer at Wyoming—I propose therefore to take an early occasion of recalling the Detachment of the Jersey Line; to this measure I am particularly...
Agreeably to the promise contained in my Letter of the 6th to Your Excellency, I immediately made application to Sir Guy Carleton for the Passport you requested—which he made no hesitation in forwarding with a very polite Letter to me; and which I have now the pleasure of enclosing. I have the honor to be Sir Your Most Obed. Sert PHi : Gratz Collection.
Agreeably to the promise contained in my Letter of the 6th to your Excellency, I immediately made application to Sir Guy Careton for the Passport you requested;which he made no hesitation in forwarding with a very polite Letter to me, and which I have now the pleasure of enclosing.I have the honor to be Sir Your Most Obt &c. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
In consequence of your Excellency’s favor of the 29th ulto I shall immediately apply, thro’ Sir Guy Carleton, for the passports for the Sloop Cohansey. Should I obtain them they shall be forwarded to you. I have the honor to be with the greatest Respect Your Excellency’s Most obt and hble ervt PHi .
I must request your Excellency to make it a Rule in future, when persons apply for Liberty to go to or within the Enemy’s Lines, to insert in your passports that they shall repair to Dobbs’s Ferry, which is the only Post from whence Flags are sent or at which they are received. This is absolutely necessary to prevent that illegal Intercourse & Traffic which are now carried to so great a...
I feel myself much obliged by the friendly Communication of your sentiments to me on the subject of retaliation, conveyed under your favor of the 30th of May, a subject truly disagreeable & distressing to me. The horrid circumstances of barbarity which introduced the instance which now gains your particular attention, came to me under the representation of so respectable a Body of Citizens,...
In reply to your Excellency’s favor of the 15th Instt I have to observe, that considering the several important Circumstances which have occurr’d in public Affairs, and the uncertainty of the operations of the Campaign, I should not think it advisable that the Recruits should march to join the Southern Army, untill further Orders—In the mean Time, the Number ought to be augmented as much as...
I lately gave permission for two Vessells to proceed as Flags of Truce from New York to Wilmington with Cloathing & necessaries for the British and Hessian Prisoners confined in Philadelphia and Lancaster. I thought it proper to give your Excellency this information that such measures as you may think proper may be taken to prevent any improper intercourse between the Flags & the Inhabitants....
I was in hopes I should not again have had occasion to have troubled your Excellency on the subject of the Hospital at Wilmington: but our distress on the score of money renders it absolutely necessary. The sick are suffering—indeed perishing—for want of Wood and Straw, which have as yet been partially furnished by the exertions of Docr Latimer and the humanity of individuals. As your...
I am informed by the Director General, that there will be a necessity of establishing a temporary Hospital at Wilmington, for the accommodation of a number of Soldiers returning from Virginia, whose cases will not admit of their being brought further at this advanced season. Doctor Latimer, the Bearer, is appointed to establish this Hospital, and I must request the favor of your Excellency to...
Copy: Harvard University Library We wrote to you pretty fully on the State of Affairs here, in ours of the 12th of March and 19th of this Month, since which there has been little Alteration. There is yet no Certainty of a sudden Declaration of War, but the Preparations go on vigorously both here and in Spain, the Armies of france drawing towards the Sea Coasts, and those of Spain to the...
LS : National Archives; L : British Library; copy: National Archives It is now more than 4 Months since Mr. Franklin’s Departure from Philadelphia, and not a Line from thence written since that time has hitherto reached either of your Commissioners in Europe. We have had no Information of what passes in America but thro’ England, and the Advices are for the most part such only as the Ministry...
ALS and copy: National Archives We send you herewith the Draught of a Frigate, by a very ingenious Officer in this service, which appears to Us peculiarly suitable for Our purpose, and We are in hopes of being able to ship Cordage and Sail Cloth, and Anchors &c. sufficient for Five or Six such Frigates, by the Time you can have them built. Though deprived of any intelligence from you since the...
ALS and copy: National Archives Since Our last We have received the inclosed Intelligence from London, which we take the earliest Opportunity of forwarding, in hopes it may be received with Our other Letters by Nantes. A Vessel from So: Carolina, loaded by that state, which sailed the 20th December, is arrived at L’Orient with Rice and Indigo. As We were particular in Our last which was sent...
LS and copy: National Archives; copy: Harvard University Library Since our last, a Copy of which is enclosed Mr. Hodge is arrived here from Martinique, and has brought safely the Papers he was charged with. He had a long Passage and was near being starved. We are about to employ him in a Service, pointed out by you, at Dunkirk or Flushing. He has delivered us three sets of the Papers we...
LS and two copies: National Archives; copy: South Carolina Historical Society We joined each other at this place on the 22d. of December and on the 28th. had an Audience of his Excellency the Count De Vergennes, one of his most Christian Majesty’s principal Secretarys of State and Minister for Foreign Affairs. We laid before him our Commission with the Articles of the proposed Treaty of...
ALS and copy: National Archives I arrived here about two Weeks since, where I found Mr. Deane. Mr. Lee has since join’d us from London. We have had an Audience of the Minister, Count de Vergennes, and were respectfully receiv’d. We left for his Consideration a Sketch of the propos’d Treaty. We are to wait upon him tomorrow with a strong Memorial requesting the Aids mentioned in our...
ALS and copy: National Archives After a short but rough Passage of 30 Days we anchor’d in Quiberon Bay, the Wind not suiting to enter the Loire. Capt. Wicks did every thing in his Power to make the Voyage comfortable to me; and I was much pleas’d with what I saw of his Conduct as an Officer, when on suppos’d Occasions we made Preparation for Engagement, the good Order and Readiness with which...
DS and copy: National Archives “On my leaving London Arthur Lee Esqr. requested me to inform the Committee of Correspondence, that he had several conferences with the French Embassador who had communicated the same to the French Court, that in consequence thereof the Duke De Vergennes had sent a gentleman to Mr. Lee, [who informed] him that the French Court could not think of entering into a...
ALS : National Archives This will inform of a Small Addition to our good fortune in the Prize Way. We this day took Capt. Muckelno in the Schooner Peter of Liverpool from St. Vincent bound to Liverpool in Brittain, Loaded with: Rum: Sugar Coffee Cocoa and Cotton. We also took Capt. Mackey in the Ship Friendship from Granada, bound to London, which I have wrote you of before, and Now Send a...
ALS : National Archives This will inform you of my proceedings since I left Cape May the 3d Instant. We left that place in Company with 13 Merchant Men, who I think all got Safe off, as we did not loose Sight of them till they got a good distance from the Land. We Saw no Ships of War at all on the Coast. We this Day fell in with Captain Mackay, in the Ship Friendship from Granada bound to...
ALS : (duplicate): Library of Congress This letter, in form to Morris but in fact to the committee, is the only one from Deane that Franklin surely saw before his departure for France; it was therefore part of his small stock of information about what would face him in Europe. The letter deals only with the preliminaries of Deane’s mission, because he reached France long after he had hoped to....
ALS : National Archives I received your orders and Instructions by Mr. Bingham, the 14th Inst. but the Shallop with the provisions did not Arrive till this day. We have now got all the provision on board both from the Wasp and Shallop. You may depend on my best endeavours in your Service to prosecute this Voyage with the Most expedition and Advantage in my power. My People, all to two are in...
AL and copy: National Archives; letterbook draft: Algemeen Rijksarchief, the Hague Après vous avoir donné ci-joint copie ou extrait de ce qu’il y avoit de plus essentiel dans ma premiere dépeche que je nommerai A pour la briéveté, je commence celle-ci, que je nomme B, en forme de Journal. Ayez la bonté, conséquemment, lorsque vous m’écrirez, de me marquer que vous avez reçu, ou non, la Dépeche...
AL and copy: National Archives; letterbook draft: Algemeen Rijksarchief, the Hague. J’ai reçu le 6e de ce mois à La Haie, des mains de Mr. Tho. Storey, les dépêches dont vous l’aviez chargé pour moi en date du 9e Xbr. 1775. Je suis touché, pénétré jusqu’au fond du coeur, de l’honneur que me fait et de la confiance que me témoigne le Committé nommé par le Congrès général pour la Correspondance...
Your favour of the 25th Ulto recommendatory of Mr Moylan, came duely to hand, & I have the pleasure to inform you that he is now appointed Commissary General of Musters—one of the Offices which the Congress was pleased to leave to my disposal —I have no doubt, from your acct of this Gentleman, of his discharging the duty with honour and fidility. For the occurrances of the Camp, I refer to my...