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Doctor McWorter has represented to His Excellency the case of a certain negro lately taken by a party of militia belonging to Mr. Caleb Wheeler. This fellow, it seems, some time since, went over to the enemy, and is now detained in confinement on that account. I am ordered to desire you to inquire into the circumstances of the affair, and particularly by whom the negro was taken, for on this...
Camp at Cross Roads [ Pennsylvania ] August 14, 1777. Instructs Dayton to send information on strength of the enemy at Kings Bridge and on Staten Island. Also asks Dayton to send account of number of boats available in that area. LS , in writing of H, The Huntington Library, San Marino, California.
I am sorry that we have not yet been able to get a return for the papers I last sent you, as the Minister makes it an object to have them in regular sucession. I send you some late Philadelphia papers, which I entreat you to get exchanged and if possible to get all the papers since the last exchange. Your’s with great resp ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. Dayton was at Springfield,...
Letter not found: to Col. Elias Dayton, 20 Jan. 1777. Dayton’s letter to GW of 13 Jan. is docketed in part “Ansd 20th.”
Yours of this morning has just reached me. In consequence of Advice recd this day of the Enemy’s having sent a Number of Vessels up the Sound and that others are moving up the North River, I shall march with the Army to morrow Morning towards New Windsor. You are to follow immediately with your own and Colo. Ogdens Regiments thro’ the Clove. I have given Colo. Morgan his directions and what...
By a Letter received this Morning from Lord Stirling of the 22d Inst., I find he intends to pursue his Rout from peeks Kill, through Keckyate & pyramus to the Great Falls—From thence thro Watsessing—Springfeild & Brunswic or Bound Brook. The reason of my being thus particular in describing Lord Stirlings Rout, is, Because I wish you to take every possible pains in your power, by sending trusty...
The inclosed Letter, from Majr Burnet, just now came to Genl Greene. You will compare the Intelligence, which you obtain with the information contained in this Letter, and after making such Observations & remarks upon the whole, you will transmit the same with this Letter to Lord Stirling. I am Sir Yr Hble servt P.S. I wrote you today by One of Blands Light Horse upon the subject of...
I have this moment receiv’d information from Philadelphia that the Enemies Fleet made their appearance at the Capes of Delaware yesterday, you are therefore to march as expeditiously as you can with your own and Colo. Ogdens Regts to Philadelphia by the way of Trenton where Boats will be prepar’d to carry you across. you will take care and not over march your Men. I am yr most Obet Servt. come...
Having recd information that the Fleet have left the Capes of Delaware and steered Eastward, you are immediately upon the Rect of this to return and keep upon your march till you reach Peekskill. If you find any Ships thrown into King’s Ferry way, you are to proceed to New Windsor and cross there. I am &c. Df , in Tench Tilghman’s writing, DLC:GW ; Varick transcript , DLC:GW . An endorsement...
The conduct of the Enemy is distressing, and difficult to be understood. Since my last, directing you to proceed to Peekskill, their Fleet, or a pretty considerable part of it, has appeared off the Capes of Delaware, as we were yesterday advised by express. In this state of incertainty about their real object & designs, I think it advisable, that you should halt your own and Colo. Ogden’s...
You will perceive by the inclosed, which was wrote a few days ago, that you were ordered to halt, for the Reasons therein given. The letter, by Mistake of the Express, was carried up the Morris Town road, and as you were not to be heard of upon that Rout, it was brought back. As we are under the same uncertainty as to the destination of the Fleet, that we were when the inclosed was wrote, you...
I have received your letter of the 11th and have given a warrant for the month’s pay agreeable to your request. As your present situation is not inconvenient for gaining intelligence of what may be passing about Kings-Bridge in New York and on Staten Island, I wish you to take every method in your power to inform yourself of the situation of the enemy, their strength and motions at those...
You are immediately upon Receipt of this to march your Regiment and Colonel Ogdens with all their Baggage by way of Trenton to join your Brigade—You will make all convenient haste on the March, and it is probable that you will fall in with the Brigade at Philadelphia or somewhere below that Place. I am Sir &c. Df , in John Laurens’s writing, DLC:GW ; Varick transcript , DLC:GW .
I recd yours of the 13th instant last Evening, and have immediately written to Govr Livingston upon the Subject. I make no doubt but the prosecution will be immediately stopped upon my representation of the matter in its true light, and of my pointing out the impossibility of getting persons to undertake this kind of Business in future if they are not protected by us. Df , in Tench Tilghman’s...
I am favd with yours of the 20th Feby and am sorry to find from it that the ill state of your health added to the situation of your private Affairs renders it highly inconvenient on the last account and impossible upon the former to remain in the Service. I am so well convinced that you have no others motives for quitting the service than those you have alledged, that you have my consent as...
If through the Channel you mentioned to me the other day, or any other, you could speedily ascertain the following points you would render an essential service to the Public & to me a favr. Whether Transports under Convoy of one or more Men of War hath lately arrived at New York from Georgia, or So. Carolina? Whether any Troops are under orders for Imbarkation? or whether from report, or...
The Assembly of this State, at their last sitting, passed a law for the payment of the provision which the Army were under the necessity of taking from the inhabitants during the scarcity in Camp and between the 15th Decemr and 15th January —The law directs that no provision seized as aforesaid shall be paid for, unless upon a Certificate signed by the Commander in Chief, or by some person...
I have reced yours of the 15th. I shall be glad to be informed whether the Fleet mentioned by you, as having sailed on thursday last, consisted of armed ships or Merchant men, and if the former, their number, force, and destination. I am Sir Yr most obt Sert &c. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I have this morning recd yours without a date. If the embarkation mentioned by you is intended for Hallifax and Cape Breton, I cannot conceive why it should partly consist of Horse, which will be in a manner useless at either of those places. I would therefore wish your emissary to make as minute enquiry as possible into their real destination—desire him also in every communication which he...
The intercourse between the inhabitants of the States and the Citizens of New York, by means of the Flag Boats which pass from the latter to Elizabeth Town, has become so very frequent that it excites suspicions and jealousies in the minds of many of the well affected among us, and puts it much in the power of the Enemy to gain intelligence, and to propagate injurious reports, thro’ the...
I recd your favr of the 28th that of yesterday reached me late last Night. I most sincerely wish that your suspicions of the truth of Rivingtons publication may prove well grounded, but I confess it bears too many marks of authenticity. Should you receive any further confirmation of your opinion be pleased to let me have it. It was always my intention that your own Regiment should remain with...
I have Been hear near a week with the army and in that time made three attempts to See you. twice I have Been Over without Liberty from this Side and with Liberty as I Desoired Mr Bunnel to tell you if I Cannot See you By Some Means or Other that we may fix Some matters that Cannot Be trusted any Other way I Shall Be Oblidged to go home to new york and Shall not Be able to Do that for you that...
I have been favd with yours of the 3d 4th and 7th—Upon your representation, and that of Mr Caldwell, of the exposed state of the Country in the Vicinity of Elizabeth town I have ordered down your Regiment, for the purposes of affording protection to the inhabitants—enabling you to remain with safety below, to procure intelligence and put Flags again under proper regulations. I would wish you...
I have recd both your favors of the 15th announcing the arrival of Admiral Greaves, which is rather an unlucky circumstance—I have only to desire you to endeavour to ascertain his force exactly, and to gain a knowledge of what preparations they are making for defence of the harbour, and where they seem disposed to dispute the passage. You mention a talk in New York of a further embarkation to...
I have recd yours of yesterday with the intelligence it inclosed—That the French and Spanish Fleets have formed a junction at Martinico is true, but we have had no accounts of any engagement since the junction. Having no reason to suppose that the Deserters are imposters, I have permitted them to go back with the Guard to get their Cloaths which they say were left at Head Quarters—Mr Woodruff...
I have recd your favor of this date, as I did those of the 17th and 18th. I can by no means accede to Capt. Stewards proposal of giving up his three Deserters for an Officer of ours now in Captivity, as that kind of composition is wholly unprecedented—Neither can I consent to his having an interview with his Mother—except in the presence of an Officer in whom you can confide. Every measure is...
I have been for some days past under apprehensions for the safety of your Regiment—It is certainly too much exposed in its present position—I therefore desire that you will remove it some distance into the Country where it may be less exposed and yet answer the purposes for which it was sent into the neighbourhood of Elizabeth Town—It appears to me that West Farms would be a good position as I...
You will take post with and hut your brigade somewhere in the entrance of the Clove as near as possible for convenience of Wood & Water to the forks of the road that go one to Ringwood the other to Charlottenburgh—From thence you will detach constantly light flying parties towards Hackensack the liberty Pole &c. to protect the country and suppress a traffic with the enemy as much as possible;...
I find by the Arrangement of the Jersey Brigade, which has just come to hand, that Colonel Shreve has retired from the service—this makes your presence extremely necessary with the Troops; and the more so at this time as some dispute about rank is said to exist between Lt Col. Barber & Lt Col. D’Hart—which, while there is no superior Officer to both of them, may produce parties and cabals to...
You will immediately, agreeable to the General Orders of this day, augment the two light Infantry Companies to the number directed, and you will also be pleased to order three other Companies of equal numbers to be formed by detachment from the Brigade, taking the same care in the choice of Officers and Men as for the light Companies to enable you to do this more effectually, you may, if you...
You will put the detachment of 250 Men ordered in mine of the 16h inst. under the Command of Majr Genl the Marquis de la Fayette. I am &c. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
It will be indispensably necessary that we should be informed of the preparations or movements of the Enemy in New York during the absence of the detachment under the command of the Marquis de la Fayette. You will therefore be pleased to employ some of the most trusty persons within your knowledge upon this Business. My principal apprehensions are for the posts up this River—They will...
Your several Letters of the 9th, 15th & 18th Inst. were duly received, while I was absent from this place, on my journey to Rhode Island, I have now to thank you for the intelligence communicated in them. It gives me great uneasiness, to find that the irregular & improper mode of receiving & treating British Flags at Elisabeth Town, should open a channel of intelligence for the Enemy, and...
His Exy is much surprized that no Returns of your Line have been transmitted to Head Quarters since the late Arangement of the Army has taken place, he therefore desires me to inform you that it is his positive Orders that a Monthly state of the Jersey Line be transmitted to the Orderly Office, so as to reach it by the 25th—or at farthest by the last Saturday of every Month. I am Sir DNA : RG...
I have never yet heard whether the Officers have had any or what success under the Law for recruiting. You will be pleased to inform me by the first oppertunity. We have a report by the way of Kings bridge that there has been an action between the French and British Fleets, but no particulars. If you hear any thing of it from Staten Island be pleased to let me hear from you. I am Yr most obt...
Annexed is a duplicate of what I had written to you on the 27th ulto the original I fear miscarried last Week as the post is missing and supposed to be carried into New York. The intelligence contained in yours of the 30th ulto "that the fleet was laying at the Hook the 28th" must have been ill founded, as I see by a York paper that they had been spoken with the 21st to the southward of the...
I have recd yours of the 10th: I prefer permitting an escape to giving up—because doing the last would imply that we think we have no right to seize upon a deserter in all cases whatever and wherever we can find him, a point which I would always insist upon, more especially as it may one day be brought in question where a Gentleman of high rank, who formerly belonged to us, may be the object....
I have received the Communications, which you did me the favor to make, in Your Letter of the 20th Ultimo. The knowledge of the present state of the Enemy in New York & its dependencies with regard to the total strength, and the particular disposition of the Corps, is of so great and interesting importance, that I must request you will have the goodness to turn your earliest & strictest...
I did myself the pleasure of writing to you the 28th of March last importing his Excellency’s surprize that the Jersey Brigade had not made returns to the orderly Office since the late arrangement took place in the army and desiring that you might be punctual in sending a Monthly state of the Line to the orderly Office so as to reach it by the last Saturday in every Month, yet no return has...
I last night recd your favr of the 9th. The intelligence you communicate is interesting and what you will be pleased either to confirm or contradict as speedily as possible and with as much precision as you can as to the number of ships of War—Troops and destination—The number of ships of the line mentioned by your informant must be false except the enemy have received a reinforcement. I have...
The late accounts from New York are mysterious and perplexing, but they at any rate demand that we should be in readiness to move. You will therefore concentre, as much as possible, your Brigade and put them under marching orders. The parties at the Clove are not to be immediately called in, but the Officers commanding them warned to be in readiness. Should an evacuation of New York take...
I have been favd with yours of the 2d instant. It is very unaccountable that so many Indications of an evacuation of New York should be reported to You and that they should come from no other quarter—I have a very good channel of intelligence by the way of Long Island and no movement is mentioned but that of a fleet bound to Europe—I cannot help suspecting that there may be some design in...
I was Yesterday favored with your Letter without Date. Had not the Enemy made the Movement which you mention, I should, by that Time, have given you Directions to have drawn your Brigade towards this River in present Circumstances, you will be pleased to draw together as much as possibly you can, the whole Brigade (except the Parties in the Clover) to one Point, at Morris Town, where you will...
Imediately on the Receipt of this you will be pleased to collect all the Troops of your Brigade (except the Compy at Wyoming) & put up them in motion on their March towards Kingsbridge. As the Operations of the Campaign are on the Point of Comencing, you will use your utmost Diligence that the Troops come on with Dispatch. It will be v ery inconvenient (to say no more) to be loaded with...
I have recd your favor of the 30th ulto. I take if for granted that this letter will meet you upon your march from Morris Town. Should you not have advancd too far towards Kingsferry to turn off towards Dobb’s without much Disadvantage, you will be pleased to do it, & inform me of your Arrival upon the West Side, where you will remain till further Orders. I believe I before mentioned my Desire...
I have recd your favr of this date. You will remain where you are ’till further orders, but you will make me an exact Return in the morning of the force which you have brought with you. However desirable a supply of Cloathing may be, I have no authority to allow it to be procured in the manner which Mr Caldwell mentions. I am Dear Sir yr most obt Servt CSmH .
You will this evening detach a party of 100 men to take post upon the Heights at Fort Lee and those above it opposite to Spiten Devil and wherever any shipping may lay. I would wish the Officers to be intelligent and capable of observation—and to make remarks upon the seeming strength of the enemy if they turn out upon an Alarm and how they in such cases dispose of their troops—The Business of...
The inclosed for General Forman is of so much importance that I do not care to trust it to a common hand. If there should be an Officer in the Jersey Brigade who has any business in Monmouth he may be sent with it. If there is none under such circumstances, I must request you to send one on purpose. I am &c. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I have rec’d your’s of the 23d, you must consider your present post of importance and the nearer you are to the point to be defended the greater will be its security it would therefore be more proper should the ground be eligable to pitch your Camp as near as possible to the Block than to occupy a position one or two miles either to the right or left. The sending your horses to pasture even at...
Some Convoys are coming on from the Jersies to Dobb’s Ferry—for their Security against the Enemy—you will be pleasd, by Order of the General, to throw out some Parties from your Comand thro’ Springfield to Aquacanack with Directions to scour below towards Newark—& continue till the Convoys are safely arrived. I am &ca P.S. in your Comand you will include the Militia lately arrived. DLC :...