You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Lovell, James
  • Recipient

    • Adams, Abigail
    • Adams, Abigail
  • Period

    • Revolutionary War

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Lovell, James" AND Recipient="Adams, Abigail" AND Recipient="Adams, Abigail" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
Results 1-10 of 58 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
It is probable that Genl. Howe will waste the fall of this year between Chesapeak Bay and Delaware River. I send you a copied sketch of part of the country to which the Gazettes will frequently refer; as I know You give singular attention to the interesting concerns of America in the present struggle. This knowledge is only part of the foundation of my affectionate esteem of you. Nor will I...
As the delivery of this Billet cannot be attended with the disagreable allarm which the amiable Mrs. Adams some time ago suffered from a well meant but indiscretely-managed little Compliment of one of her Admirers, I improve this fair opportunity to congratulate her, thus, upon the late happy events at Saratoga, greatly important to the Public and, consequently, interesting to her patriotic...
I am to thank you, in my own name, and on the public account, for that exercise of laudable patriotic prudence, which you have modestly termed the “Freedom” of inclosing to me Mr. McCreary’s letter to your worthy Husband. I read it in Congress, and I think it will be useful to the commercial Committee. The same Gentleman wrote to Mr. Adams in Sepr. some interesting history, of which he gave me...
When I tell you that no Credit is to be given to the late Report of an attempted Assassination of Doctor Franklin, you are not to attribute my Assertion to an Endeavour to give Relief, at all Adventures , to the anxious Mind of an amiable Sufferer. Had your Letters of the 1st. and 8th. of March reached me before this Morning, I could not have given you so much Satisfaction as at present. I...
Amiable tho unjust Portia! doubly unjust!—to yourself, and to me. Must I only write to you in the Language of Gazettes, enumerating, on the Part of Britain, Acts of Deceit, Insolence and Cruelty; or, on the part of America, Instances of Patience under repeated Losses, Fortitude under uncommon Hardships, and Humanity under the grossest Provocations to Revenge? Must I suppress Opinion, Sentiment...
I have this Afternoon received your Favour of June 12th. and at the same Time a Gazette from Boston, of later Date, in which I find a pleasing Entry in Regard to Mr. Adams’s Arrival in France. It is so likely to be true from the blundering Manner of it that I venture to congratulate you upon it. Mr. Thaxter is not yet arrived here, but is expected hourly. He will heartily participate in the...
I heartily congratulate you upon the indubitable Proofs of our Friends Arrival in France. You might imagine that the Congress had received some important Intelligence in the large Packets sent lately from Boston, if I did not acquaint you that they were chiefly for Monsr. Girard who is not yet arrived. A french Fleet having sailed for America, an English One being ready to follow, and a second...
Yesterday the Letters of Portia of June 24th. and Augst. 19th. came to my hand together, by Post. The wishes expressed in the latter have made all the Impressions of the most pleasing Commands, and shall be strictly attended to upon the first possible Occasion of fulfilling them; which must, I think, be soon, tho the Embargo is not yet taken off. As to the former , I will not now make it the...
I have the Mortification of being obliged to tell the amiable Portia that the Council of Pensylvania will not grant a partial Exportation of Flour from their State while the general Embargo lasts: So that I cannot soon have the Pleasure of executing the Commission which that lovely Woman has entrusted to me. The State of Massachusetts Bay will have the Direction of a Quantity out of which the...
Having a good Opportunity, I now forward those Things which were left at York Town by your worthy Husband. I have never yet got the Box of Papers which were carried away by Mr. Sprout’s Family. They consigned the Box to a most careful Man, Mr. Houston who has promised to send it to me. But perhaps it will be a Thing convenient to the Carrier of what is now with me to call at Princeton for the...