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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Lovell, James" AND Period="Revolutionary War" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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It gives me real pain to see the various arts and machinations of our internal Enemies practised with Effect upon the generality of Mankind. From the various reports which have been too successfully circulated for this month past the people will be brought to entertain suspicions with regard to congress which will tend to weaken their Authority and be greatly detrimental to our cause. Mr. D ea...
Yes I have been Sick confined to my chamber with a slow fever. I have been unhappy through anxiety for my dear Boy, and still am apprehensive of our terrible coast should he come upon it, besides the tormenting cruizers infest our Bay with impuinity and take every thing. You have heard I suppose that the passengers all left the Ship and went to Bilboa upon Gillions abusive treatment of them....
At length the mistery is unravelld, and by a mere accident I have come to the knowledge of what you have more than once hinted at. A Letter of Mrs. Shippen addressed to Mrs. A. but without any christian Name or place of abode, was put into my Hands Supposed for me, I opened and read it half through before I discoverd the mistake. Ought Eve to have laid it by then when so honestly come at? But...
You have been so good, in sending me the Journals and above all in sending me very particular Intelligence of what has passed upon several occasions that I depend much upon the Continuance of your Favours. An early receipt of the Journals will be a great Advantage to me, and I shall not fail to make a good Use of them. Since I have been here, I have seen Mr. I. and mentioned to him, his famous...
I inclose you an English paper of May 15th whereby you will see the Temper of the English Councils & the Failure of the prince Nassau’s Expedition to Jersey & Guernsey. however, as the Troops that were designed for America, under Convoy of Admiral Arbuthnot (being 4000) went to Guernsey, it is probable they will be detained some time & possibly it will prevent their going out at all, as it is...
LS and transcript: National Archives; ALS (draft) and copy: Library of Congress The Marquis de la Fayette, our firm & constant Friend, returning to America, I have written a long Letter by him to the President, of which a Copy goes by this Ship.— M. Gerard is since arrived, and I have received the Dispatches you mentioned to me but no Letter in answer to mine, a very long one, by the Chevr de...
I thank you for the trouble you have taken in forwarding the intelligence which was enclosed in your Letter of the 11th of March—It is by comparing a variety of information, we are frequently enable to investigate facts, which were so intricate or hidden, that no single clue could have led to the knowledge of them in this point of view, intelligence becomes interesting, which from but its...
LS and transcript: National Archives; AL (draft) and copy: Library of Congress I received on the 12th of June 1780 Copies of your several Favours of April 29. 1779. June 13. 1779. July 9th. & 16th. Augt 6. & Sept. 16th. 1779.— You will see by this what Delays our Correspondence sometimes meets with. I have lately receiv’d two of fresher Date, viz. Feb. 24. & May 4. I thank you much for the...
In my Letter to congress of the 16 of May, inclosing my Memorial, I observed, that the Bravery of our Countrymen in Carolina, De la motte piquets Captures, and the Spanish opperations of Gibraltar, had contributed to raise the Spirits of this nation from that gloom, in which the Capture of Statia Essequebo and Demerara had plunged them. I did not then conceive it possible that I should be...
Your Letters arrived in the absence of Mr. Adams who is gone as far as Portsmouth, little thinking of your plot against him. O Sir you who are possessd of Sensibility, and a tender Heart, how could you contrive to rob me of all my happiness? I can forgive Mr. Geary because he is a Stranger to domestick felicity and knows no tenderer attachment than that which he feel s for his Country, tho I...