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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="Revolutionary War" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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I was favour’d with your Letter the other Day by Mrs. Randolph . We had before her Arrival heard of the death of our worthy Friend. The great Load of Business I have had on Hand ever since the Convention obliged me to confine my Correspondence to him, knowing that he would communicate my Letters to the rest of the Associates. The infamous Practice of opening all Letters passing thro’ the...
I was so much ingaged last week in watching the motions of his Lordships Tenders, that I was depriv’d the pleasure of writing to you, three of which came up the length of James Town, and were haild by some of our riflemen, and not answering were fired upon by them, another report says the Tenders fired first, and attemted to and some men, but were prevented by eight rifle men, for there are no...
I thank God I am now so well that I could venture to write you a long Letter if a Multiplicity of Business did not render it impossible. But I will make the best Use of my Time and scribble you some fugitive Sentences. I wrote to Col. Nelson and you by the Post before the last, giving some Account of the Norfolk and Hampton Affairs. I can assure that our young Soldiers behaved extremely well,...
Former labours in Various Public emploiements now appear as recreations compared with the present, which affords a scanty allowance for food and sleep; I mention this as an Appology to you and my other freinds for not having wrote more frequently. The Committee having now Adjourned for a fortnight, I am at home and mean to write for Next Post as I set out on a small mountain excursion...
I receiv’d your favour dated Philadelphia Oct. 26th by the Express. In answer thereto I assure you I have not the least doubt but we shall be able to procure that Necessary article of Salt Petre if Attended to. I find Gentlemen here loath to risk as much cash as wou’d Make the Necessary preperations. I have been kept back my self by sickness in my famely, and have been much indispos’d my self....
I was not a little disappointed to find that you still complain of my not writing to you, when I have written twice since the Norfolk and Hampton Affairs. Your not mentioning those Letters greatly discourages me—not that I care who sees what I write, but that I stil should write and write again And you of my Neglect complain. The Affair of Princess Ann mentioned in your joint Letter to our...
I had written to you soon after the repulse of our Troops at Quebec, giving you, as I thought, a true state of that unfortunate affair; but upon comparing it, (altho I had my information from a person who pretended to know a good deal of the matter) with one that I saw afterwards, I found they differ’d so materially that I burnt my Letter and determin’d to leave you to the News papers for your...
If this should find you at Congress, when the business it relates to is undetermined, I hope you will use your Influence in favor of your humble Servant. It is believ’d here that a Physician will be appointed to the Continental Troops in this Colony; an office that I desire Exceedingly, as it would gratify at the same time my passion for Improvement in the profession I am destined to, and my...
I wish you would use your Interest in behalf of Dr. McClurg. He offers his Service as Physician to the Continental Forces in Virginia. Such a Person is much wanted. Col. Grayson who behaved admirably well at Hampton and who has taken great Pains to improve himself in the Military Science intends to offer his Service to the Congress. He is highly deserving of Encouragement. Do introduce him and...
I have snatched a few Moments to scribble you a few loose Thoughts on our present critical Situation. I think our Countrymen have exhibited an uncommon Degree of Virtue, not only in submiting to all the hard Restrictions and exposing themselves to all the Dangers which are the Consequence of the Disputes they are involved in with Great Britain, but in behaving so peaceably and honestly as they...