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ALS : American Philosophical Society Govr. Pownall presents his Compliments to Mr. Franklin and shou’d be very glad to the favour of his company to Dinner to Day. If he is engaged Govr. Pownall shou’d be very glad to see him any Part of this Evening if not otherwise engaged. [ Memo in Franklin’s hand: ] Forts. and Indian Expenses. Ministers make an impossible Act and run mad that it will not...
ALS : American Philosophical Society If you have nothing better to do will you be so good to call on me this Morning and take a Family Dinner with us. I would call on you but having the symptoms of a great Minister strong upon by name the Gout I am not able to walk. I wish much to see you. Your friend and Servant Addressed: To / B Franklin Esqr / &c William Pitt, a famous sufferer from the...
AL : American Philosophical Society Govr. Pownall presents his Compliments to Dr. Franklin finds he shall necessarily be detained at home here to too late an hour for breakfasting with Dr. Franklin. But will if not inconvenient call upon him about eleven. Addressed: Dr Franklin / at Mrs Stevenson’s / Craven Street/ Strand
AL : American Philosophical Society Mr. Strahan presents his best Compliments to Dr. Franklin, and begs he would send the Letter by the Bearer. This note might have been written at any time when BF was in London after he had received his honorary doctorate from the University of St. Andrews in February 1759. It is possible that the letter Strahan referred to was one of BF ’s communications to...
AL : American Philosophical Society Mr. and Mrs. Strahan present their Compliments to Dr. Franklin and the Ladies, and conceiving it may be more agreeable and convenient for them, will not dine till three o’Clock to day. Addressed: To / Dr. Franklin / or / Mrs. Stevenson Apparently “the Ladies” were Mrs. Stevenson and her daughter Mary (Polly), if the note was written before the latter’s...
AL : American Philosophical Society Mr. and Mrs. Wood present their Compliments to Dr. Frankland and beg the favour of his Company to dinner to morrow at three o’ Clock. An undated note from Mrs. Stevenson of about 1767–70 mentions a Mr. Wood who called while BF was away from Craven Street for a few days. The caller told her that BF knew where he lodged and that they had seen each other in...
AL : American Philosophical Society Mrs. French thinks it long since she had the pleasure of seeing Dr. Frankin, called at his house to desire the favor of his Company to dinner tomorrow to meet Mr. Payne to play at Chess till half an hour after 7 o’ [ clock ]. Will be happy to see him as [early?] in the Morning as is agreeable. Addressed: To. Dr. Franklin For BF ’s old friend see above, XVIII...
AL : American Philosophical Society Mrs. Montagu presents her compliments to Dr. Franklyn, and is afraid he will think her troublesome in desiring the favour of his company on Sunday next the 19th, as well as on this day sennight. Mr. Bolton, who has promised to dine with Mrs. Montagu on sunday, will be best rewarded for his civility by meeting Dr. Franklyn, and so great an Artist as Mr....
ALS : American Philosophical Society The letters that follow we have found impossible to date. All of them, presumably, were written after Polly Stevenson’s marriage in 1770, when Dolly began to pay Franklin more attention than before “tho not more than I have always been prompted from affection to Pay.” Prior to the wedding no correspondence exists between them, or at least none that can be...
AL : American Philosophical Society <Jermyn Street, Wednesday morning, in the third person. Invites Franklin to dinner next Monday. > BF ’s friendship with the Shipleys appears to have begun in 1771, and we are therefore printing the invitation under the earliest likely date.
Printed form with MS insertions in blanks: American Philosophical Society Vous étes prié, de la part de Monsieur le Curé & de Madame Le Veillard , Trésoriere des Pauvres, de vous trouver à l’Assemblée de Charité qui se tiendra dans l’Eglise Royale & Paroissiale de Notre-Dame-de-Graces de Passy, à l’issue des Vépres, Dimanche prochain 5 7bre 1779 Il y aura Prédication, par mr L’abbé gautier...
ALS : American Philosophical Society The Bearer is Baron Steieben of whome I had the honor to write to you by the hands of a Friend about a month since. He is a Gentleman of Family, Merit and great experience, well known to some of the First Personages in Europe, and hereby gives you sir a strong proof of his Ambition to make the Acquaintance of Doctor Franklin in actualy performing a Journey...
ALS (incomplete): American Philosophical Society [ Missing ] ourselves without making Mr. W—s experiment. But to be serious; unluckily for that Gentleman I have drawn no conclusion from his favourite experiment, except it be this, that a point will not invite a stroke of lightning upon it, at 12 times the distance of a knob. The chains happen’d to be both of the same wire, and length. Whoever...
Incomplete draft: American Philosophical Society Illustrissimo Signor Signor Padrone mio Colendissimo. A quest’ora avrete ricevuto risposta alle vostre direttavi per mezzo [ blank in MS ] riceverete anche questa per l’istesso canale, e potrete rispondermi per il medesimo; che così La spesa sarà tutta addosso a me, e riceverò lettere sicuramente; perciocchè le due penultime vostre hanno tardato,...
ALS : American Philosophical Society The condescending respect with which Your Excellency hath in repeated Instances regarded me and mine is matter of gratful contemplation. Permit us to look with sincerest Veneration to the Man distinguish’d amongst a glorious Band of firm Characters: who sustain’d by divine Providence, have thus farr, form’d and Fostered the Rising world of Freedom. May...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I have not been fortunate enough to be in Craven Street when letters have been forwarding to you and now have reason to fear that it will not be without some difficulty that mine will be of the happy number that will get to you, at least it seems so to me from a note that I have just now read of Sir Huttons. However neither my small hopes, nor my great...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I have only time till [ to tell] you I hope your wellcom, to Philada: welcom i am shuer you ar but I mean in good health, and safe arrived, and my Daer Temple, pray tell him too writ to Mrs. Wolford. I hope you ar ashurd I take every opportunity to send your papers, by this Shipe. I am oblig’d to Mr. Baliy for Inquiring at the Coffehous. The Bishop sent to...
LS : Massachusetts Historical Society; draft: Massachusetts Archives; copies: National Archives and Connecticut State Library The second Massachusetts provincial congress, elected by the towns as the first had been, held two sessions between February 1 and April 15, 1775. It then recessed until May 10, but as a result of Lexington and Concord reconvened on April 22. By that time John Hancock...
Two copies: Moravian Archives, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania Your safe return from England into this Province, at so very critical a Time, has given me and my Brethren much Joy, we viewd and honor’d the Hand of God in it, hoping that your deep Knowledge and long Experience in the House of Assembly will once more be well apply’d for the good of this Country. I can therefore assure you that we thankd...
Printed in Votes and Proceedings of the Province of Pennsylvania . . . (6 vols., Philadelphia, 1752–76), VI , 587. Franklin had no more than set foot in Philadelphia before he was plunged into local as well as Congressional politics. The day after he arrived the Assembly chose him unanimously as a delegate to Congress. On June 30 he was appointed to the Pennsylvania committee of safety and...
ALS : Yale University Library Welcom a Hundred times Welcom to our once happy Land. Are you in Health and allow me to ask you the old question over again if you are the Same good old Soul you used to be? Your arrival gives New Spring to all have heard mention it. When Shall We See you here? Do let it be as Soon as the Congress is adjournd or dont know but your good Sister and Self Shall mount...
ALS : Yale University Library God be Praised for bring you Saif back to America and soporting you throw such fatuges as I know you have sufered while the minestry have been distresing Poor New England in such a Cruil maner. Your last by Poor Quensey Advises me to keep up my Cuiridg and that foul wither does not last allways in any country. But I beleve you did not then Imagin the storm would...
ALS : Duke University Library The frequent accounts of your Intentions of leaving England, also unwilling to intrude on time taken up with Matters of Consiquence prevented my Writing as often as I otherwise should have done, however constrained by a real Esteem for a Gentleman so great a friend [of] Mankind in general and of American in particular will I trust plead my Excuse for thus...
ALS (draft): Library of Congress En attendant que j’aie l’avantage de répondre plus au long à la Lettre dont vous m’avez honoré de Londres par Mr. Rey en date du 24 fevr. 1774, Celle-ci vous sera présentée par Messieurs Giraud et Planier et leurs Epouses, quatre braves et honnêtes gens, qui pour l’amour du plus précieux de tous les biens de l’homme, pour l’amour de la liberté, ont quitté leur...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Since my last I have recvd from La Duchesse de Villroy the Plan of your Armonica improved, which you will receive by this Ship. The Newspapers will give you all in the political Way. I have been several Days shut up in your Room, so have not been able to gather any thing more than the Public Prints contain. You will see by the Fate of the N York and Quebec...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Some time since Mr. Wm Lee forwarded my letter to you advising the payment of £100 from the Constitutional Society into the hands of your Bankers Messrs. Brown Collinson & Co. towards relieving the distress’d Inhabitants of Boston. On the 23d Inst. they voted £100 more for their relief which is also paid into the hands of the same Gentlemen on your Account...
Incomplete autograph copy: Yale University Library I would give much more than I can afford for one hours friendly Conversation with You. Writing is a tedious dilatory Business and tis impossible to enter into those Details which go to the Essence and Marrow of the Subject and enable us to judge with clearness and confidence. Since my last the face of things is grown not only alarming but...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Here inclosed I return the Letter, which You were so complaisant and kind to let me have the Reading of. Your Answer, which You were pleased to give to it I have forwarded already. That our dear Lord may bless You and the whole Congress in all Your Deliberations and Councels is the most sincere and cordial Wish of Your devoted and most humble Servant...
Extract: Papers of the Earl of Dartmouth deposited in the Staffordshire County Record Office William Strahan was one of the few British political correspondents whom Franklin retained after leaving England. The Scot had bought himself a seat in Parliament in 1774, and consistently supported the government’s American policy. The outbreak of war, much as he regretted it, did not shake his faith...
ALS : Yale University Library Agreeable to a Message from Lord Shelburn, I waited on the Prince de Masserano spanish ambassador, for a Book which his Lordship informed me was for You. After my Name was sent up, his Secretary came and asked if I spoke French, and answering in the affirmative I was immediately admitted into the Princes Chamber, where he was dressing. He then told me that the...
ALS : American Philosophical Society My mother promis’d Lord Drummond to send a letter to you by him, she deputed Mr. Williams to write it for her, but as he has already written by this Vessel he desir’d me to do it. I pleaded being very sleepy and stupid, they said writing would rouse and enliven me, I do not find they said true, however, I will write on. I have the pleasure to tell you that...
ALS : Yale University Library Hearing that you was arrv’d in America and I being much Concrned for our belov’d Son, this is to desire you to Give us Some account of his Situation and Curcomstances. Poor fellow I feare he is now undon as a Merchant. We relying on the faith of General Gage packed up all his Goods in Order to remove them out of Boston, but was forbid by him out of whose Mouth...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I most sincerely congratulate you and your country, upon your safe arrival in America. After many years watchful attention to its interest and when you could render it no further service at home, You are at length arrived to the only Asylum and at the most critical juncture to take your place and to display your distinguished abilities among a sett of...
ALS : American Philosophical Society En réponse à la Lettre toute obligeante dont vous m’avez favorisé en date du 24 Fevrier 1774, puisque j’ai eu le bonheur de rencontrer votre goût dans le choix des nouvautés que vous avez bien voulu recevoir de moi, cela m’enhardit à continuer de vous payer le tribut de mes petits travaux. Je sens combien il est chétif; mais le desir extrême et constant que...
Copy: Papers of the Earl of Dartmouth deposited in the Staffordshire County Record Office I wrote you the 7th of last Month by the Packet, to which I beg leave to refer. I have since by the Papers and by several of your Friends, heard that you were safely arrived at Philadelphia, and unanimously voted by the Assembly then sitting, one of their Delegates to the Congress, then about to meet. I...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I write to you more to prove my remembrance of you, than for the importance of any thing I have to communicate. The two defeats near Boston seem to have made little impression on the Ministry. They still talk of great things to be expected from their Generals and Troops when united. One of your judgment will draw more information from the single word Rebels...
ALS : American Philosophical Society The Concern I knew my Ever Dear Brother would be in to know what was become of me made me take the first opertunity to write to him and twice since, but did not recve a line from you till the day befor yesterday when I recd. yrs of the 17 June and this Day I have recd. the first you wrot, it had been Return’d from Cambridg and had lane 3 weeks in Newport...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Your letter which had the Pleasure of Receiving gave me great Pleasure as it gave me a fresh Proff of your own Dear Self, and being once more on the Same Land with us. Your Dear good Sister Grew Very impatient till She heard from you and began to fear you was not Come. She was kind enough to Shew me her letter and you are fear full She will be trouble Some...
AL : American Philosophical Society Our Men have Taken [2?] Islan and brought of Eaght hundred Sheep and Catle of One an Other five hundred Sheep and Catle of the other and a Manawars barge with fore Men. Col. Robenson has Taken long Island and brught of Two hundred Sheep and Some Catle and Eaght Men and One Young Lade with out the loss of a Man. Two of the Islands was taken last Week and the...
AL (incomplete) and draft: American Philosophical Society Yesterday being the Day appointed by Lord Dartmouth I waited on him, but he having a greater Number of Gentlemen at Levee than he could attend to, I was desired to call again to day: which I accordingly did. On my entring he said, Mr. Williams I have only to tell you, I have delivered your Petition into the Kings hands, but Things are...
Transcript: Library of Congress I take the opportunity of writing a line to you by Capt. Read, tho. I have not any thing now to say. We seem rather on this side the water to be expecters of news and events; more especially as to the proceedings and proposals from the Congress. As to my own opinion and wishes, they continue the same. I can only wish generally for peace, and for such measures on...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I am very glad to collect by a Phrase in the letter from the Congress to the Canadians, that they think once more of imploring the Attention of their Sovereign. I can give you no information of the State of the Ministry, I should be one of the last to be informed of their counsels. The great fear that I entertain, is, least they should make things desperate...
Extract reprinted from Horace Wemyss Smith, Life and Correspondence of the Rev. William Smith . . . (2 vols., Philadelphia, 1880), I , 519. I thank you for Dr. Smith’s excellent Sermon. If it be not impertinent, give him my most respectful compliments and thanks. I think to get it printed. The sermon that is the subject of the extract was published, as noted below, in early July. If BF...
Copy: Papers of the Earl of Dartmouth deposited in the Staffordshire County Record Office Having wrote You April 8. June 7. and July 5. this is the Fourth Letter I have sent you since you left Us. I have in Truth Nothing new to convey to you, and only write now in Consequence of my Promise of doing so every Packet till your Return, which I still hope will be towards the Fall. It was with the...
Printed form with manuscript insertions: Yale University Library <August 2, 1775: Weatherby, a Philadelphia linen printer, binds himself and his heirs to pay Franklin or his assigns £ 44 in Pennsylvania currency. If £ 22 in the same, with interest, is paid within a year the obligation will be void. Sealed and delivered in the presence of Richard Bache and James Bryson. > Perhaps one of the...
ALS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania In the summer of 1775, while a subcommittee of the Pennsylvania committee of safety was wrestling with the organization of the associators, the rank and file of fledgling soldiers in Philadelphia were voicing three main concerns. Two of them, their pay and the treatment of those who refused to volunteer, are discussed in the headnote on the report of...
ALS : Yale University Library Colo. Harrison yesterday having informed Me that a Constitutional Post Office is now established, and that You are appointed the Head of that Department, the present Deputies I doubt not will be removed, particularly in this City and Baltimore Town. Give Me Leave to recommend Mr. York as a Rider from Philadelphia. I never heard an Imputation on his Character and...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I had lately the honour of acquainting you by Capt. Read with some particulars which I now confirm, and although but little of importance has since occurred I am induced to trouble you again with a few suggestions respecting the Title of the different Indian Tribes of America to the property and Jurisdiction of their Territories. You will doubtless remember...
ALS : American Philosophical Society This letter was apparently Franklin’s first news of an invention that might, given a fair trial, have affected the course of the war. Until the entrance of France, Britain had virtually complete control of the sea; the Royal Navy supplied and reinforced British armies, and moved them at will along the coast. Any challenge to the navy’s predominance would...
ALS : American Philosophical Society With pleasure your friends received the agreable inteligence of your safe arrival and health. Inclos’d I return a Letter for you directed to our care. From different accounts I am pleased to observe, the great unanimity that prevails thr’o the Continent; your advise was never more wantd, hope it will tend to restore that invaluable blessing to which our...