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I have received Your Letter of the 5th Instant—and am much obliged to the Court for their attention in the case of John Springer Junior, and for committing him to the custody of the Sheriff. In a few days I shall give such orders about him—as will be consistent with justice and my duty to the public. In the mean time he will remain in custody of the Sheriff. His conduct in deserting to the...
I understand Mr Skinner is gone to Philadelphia. You will keep the inclosed Letter for him till he returns, when You will take the earliest opportunity of delivering it to him. I desire to see him as soon as he arrives & have written to him for the purpose. You will inform the Officer who came with a flag to Elizabeth Town Yesterday—that he is not to wait for an Answer to the Letters he...
I have received your favor of the 10th of Febry & must take the liberty to tell you candidly there would not be a propriety in my writing to the President of Congress respecting your extra-expences while acting as Depy Comy of Prisoners; because it would open a door to innumerable applications, because I do not conceive it is proper for me to interfere in the pecuniary Arrangements of...
I embrace this first oppertunity to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 20th from Philadelphia. Your meeting with the smallest delay in receiving payment for the Land purchased of Messrs Dow & Co. gives me pain—I receive no Earthly advantage from it—I have been paying interest for the Money near two Months & one of these I have had it on my desk. Had Mr Lund Washington, in explicit...
The Honble Robt Morris Esqr. will pay Mr Lund Washingtons Bills upon me for £680 in your favor—£600 in favor of Mr Peter Dow—and £600 in favor of Mr Collin McIver. I am—Sir Yr Most Hble Servt DLC : Papers of George Washington.
As the Transmission of the inclosed paper through the usual Channel of the Department of foreign Affairs would, on the present Occasion, probably be attended with great Delay—and recent Intelligence of Military Transactions must be important to our Ministers in Europe at the present period of Affairs—I have thought it would be agreeable both to Congress and your Excellency, that the Matter...
I am exceedingly sorry I did not know that you were in this place today. Our want of Men and arms is such, as to render it necessary for me to get the best advice possible of the most eligeble mode of obtaining of them. I adjourned the Council of Officers today, untill I could be favourd with your opinion (together with that of others of the General Court) on these heads. They meet again...
From the distressed situation in which I am informed Lt Colo. Antill is on Long Island, I desire that you will send him a Barrel of Beef and one of Pork, and Two Barrels of Flour. They ought to be good. If you cannot procure them yourself, you will apply to the Commissary who must furnish them. The sooner Colonel Antill can receive this supply the better. I am Sir Yr Most Obedt &c. DLC :...
I am exceedingly sorry I did not know that you were in this place today—our want of Men & Arms is such, as to render it necessary for me to get the best advice possible of the most eligeble mode of obtaining of them. I adjourn’d the Council of Officers today, untill I could be favourd with your opinion (together with that of others of the Genl Court) on these heads—they meet again tomorrow at...
This Morning your polite Letter of the 1st Instt, was delivered to me by Mr Dana. I am much obliged to you for your introduction of that Gentleman and you may rely on my shewing him every Civility in my power. I have ever thought, and am still of opinion that no terms of accomodation will be offer’d by the British Ministry, but such as cannot be accepted by America. We have nothing my Dear Sir...
You will excuse me for reminding you of our conversation the other Evening, when I inform’d you that General Lee’s departure for New York is advisable upon the Plan of his Letter, and under the circumstances I then mentioned, ought not to be delayed. In giving me your opinion of this matter I have no doubt of your taking a comprehensive view of it. That is, you will not only consider the...
As the Transmission of the inclosed paper through the usual Channel of the Department of foreign Affairs would, on the present Occasion, probably be attended with great Delay—and recent Intelligence of Military Transactions must be important to our Ministers in Europe at the present period of Affairs—I have thought it would be agreeable both to Congress & your Excellency, that the Matter...
At length I have been able to comply with the first part of a Resolution of Congress of the 27 Ultimo relative to a return of the vacancies in the Several Regiments composing that part of the Army under my immediate command. I thought to have made this Return much sooner, but the dispersed situation of our Troops—the constant duty they are upon—the difficulty of getting returns when this is...
You will excuse me for reminding you of our conversation the other evening, when I inform’d you that General Lee’s departure for New York is advisable upon the Plan of his Letter, & under the Circumstance I thene mention’d, ought not to be delayed. In giving me your opinion of this matter I have no doubt of your takeing a comprehensive view of it. That is you will not only consider the...
The approaching season, and the distresses of the Army in the Articles of Blankets & Cloathing make it necessary, that every practicable measure should be pursued to procure supplies. Therefore to releive, if possible, the wants of the Troops, raised by the State of Maryland, in these essential Articles, you are to proceed immediately to Govr Johnson with the Letters you have in charge for...
Amidst a multiplicity of Business smaller matters are apt to be overlook’d—this I conceive to be the case with respect to the proposition of a Colo. Baillie, for opening a Road from Connecticut River to Montreal, and which I laid before Congress for their direction some Months ago—The matter again occurs upon a Second application, from Mr Weatherspoon (the bearer, at, as I understand, the...
I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 11 of July inclosing to me the Address of the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts—and to assure you that the pleasure I experienced on that occasion was much enhanced by the polite manner in which you have been pleased to convey it to me. The inclosed reply I beg leave to commend to your...
I have the Honor to acknowlege the Receipt of your joint Letter of the 18th instant. Happy, inexpressibly happy, in the certain Intelligence, of a general Peace, which was concluded on the 20th Jnry—I feel an additional pleasure in reflecting that this glorious Event will prove a sure means to dispel the Fears expressed by your Commonwealth for their North Eastern Boundary, that Territory...
Being accidentally at this place, I met your letter of the 17th, here, this day. Should you obtain the permission which you have requested of the Governor of Maryland, that will be sufficient to convey you safely through the posts of the American Army; as the Officers commanding at them have directions to pay obedience, at all times, to the Acts of the Executive powers of any of the States. I...
I impart to you in confidence that I intend to execute an enterprise against Staten Island to morrow night, for which reason I am desirous of cutting off all intercourse with the Enemy on the East side of the River. You will therefore tomorrow at Retreat beating set a guard upon any Boats which may be at the slot or Niack, and not suffer any to go out on any pretence whatever, till next...
I have received your Letter of the 5th by the Sergt who conducted the deserter to this place. The idea of an Enemy’s sending a flag by a post of the adverse party into what they call their own lines, is very preposterous & inadmissible—I would not advise that any flag of truce be permitted to go beyond your Post for any purpose whatever. However desirable it might be to intercept the...
You will send a trusty non Commissioned officer and four men with the inclosed letter to Capt. Humphries, who is with General Starke and a body of troops at the White plains—You will send them across the River immediately on receipt of this and order them to make all diligence. They will return by Kings ferry. I am Sir Yr hum. servant DLC : Papers of George Washington.
[ Totowa, New Jersey ] November 24, 1780 . Asks Alden to send enclosed letter to Lieutenant Colonel David Humphreys. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Alden was a captain in the Second Massachusetts Regiment.
At the pressing request & solicitation of Roger Alden Esqr. Capt. in the 2nd Connect. Regt I am induced to grant him a discharge from the Army of the United States. At the same time I think it but justice to his merit to Certify, that so far as his service has been within the compass of my knowledge it has met with my entire approbation; and that from what I have heard and known he has on all...
I have waited, as I think you must do me the justice to acknowledge, with a good deal of patience, to see if you were disposed to fulfil your agreement with me, respecting the Land I purchased of you in Maryland. As I hear nothing of your intentions of carrying this matter into execution, and see no greater prospect of its being done now, than when the bargain was first made, I cannot help...
Having been informed by a Letter of the 14th Instt from Captn Sill of the unspeakable loss Your Ladiship has experienced, I feel the sincerest dispositions to alleviate by sympathy or participation those sorrows which I am sensible cannot be removed or effaced. for this purpose, I would also have suggested every rational topic of consolation, was I not fully perswaded that the principles of...
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] June 2, 1779 . Orders Stirling to Pompton. Asks Stirling to keep careful watch on Highland forts. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
The enemy landed at De Harts Point last night in considerable force—and are advancing rapidly this way. They may aim at our camp or they may only intend to proceed as far as the mountains and file off to the left making a sweep of all the forage Cattle &c. in their way. In any case we ought to collect the Militia to give them all the opposition in our power. I request your Lordship to give the...
I am favored with your Lordships Letter of the 6th inclosing a Copy of General Sullivans to you. I have never tho’t it well to despise Information of an Enemy’s Designs——but I must freely confess to your Lordship, that I have but little apprehensions of Danger, from the Quarter of Canada—the advanced season of the Year, were no other Obstacles in the Way, I should judge sufficient to deter the...
I have the pleasure of Your Lordships favor of the 13th. If the accounts which General Schuyler transmits be true, the Enemy have no occasion to boast of their Northern Campaign. Should Your business call you to Prince town and you can make it convenient to extend your ride to Philadelphia, I shall be happy in seeing you. Mrs Washington is better than I could have expected after the heavy loss...