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    • Washington, George
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    • Sullivan, John
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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Sullivan, John" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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I receivd your Letter of yesterday respecting Lieutt Sanborn, as also his application for a discharge—As it is not my wish to strain the Law to its full extent, but to exercise it in such a manner as to prevent irregularities, & for the support of due subordination, without which no army can long exist; & as Lieutt Sanborn stands fair in the opinion & esteem of both Officers and Soldiers, and...
The Intention of yesterday’s order, respecting the Review of the Connecticut Troops, is only to afford a good oppertunity of making choice of such of their Arms as shall be found fit for the use of the New Army. I am not without my fear that if they are appriz’d of the Intention, some of the best Arms will be Secreted; for this reason I desire you will say nothing of the matter till the...
In looking over the list of Officers in your Brigade, I find the whole compleated, except in one Instance, without paying the least regard to the order wch directed, that no Person should be Inserted that was not in the first arrangement, otherwise than by recommendation. I also find, in the Regimental returns of our Strength, in your Brigade, several matters that need explanation—to wit—a...
I agree to Adjutant Peabody’s discharge; & Colo. Otis’s Son taking his place —I do not know of any objection to the last arrangement given in by you, & shall, when my present hurry of business is a little over Issue the Commissions—My Order extended to all persons whatsoever, but from the Nature of the Office of Clerk of the Market, as you describe it, he must come in under⟨r⟩ the...
I quite forgot to enquire last night (when you were shewing me the Militia Pay Rolls) at what rates the Officers pay was charged—I am willing to allow them the same pay as the Troops here had, and have—that is, to the first of Jany agreeable to the old Establishment—(more I cannot)—& For the Month of Jany according to the present pay. this is putting of them in all respects upon a footing with...
I am a little surprizd, and concern’d to hear of your moving to Colo. Royals House —I thought you knew, that I had made a point of bringing Genel Lee from thence on Acct of the distance from his Line of Command—at least that he should not Sleep there—The same reasons holding good with respect to yourself, I should be glad if you could get some place nearer, as I think it too hazardous to trust...
inclosd you have Copy of a Letter I recd from Governor Cooke to the Contents of which I reffer you; General Green will march with his Brigade this day for Providence; & if I find that the Enemy are at Rhode Island I will Soon join him—Governor Cooke will forward this to you, & will inform you whether this alarm is well founded or not; if it is, you must repair to Providence with the troops...
Your favor of the 14 Instant I received this morning and am exceedingly sorry for the sad reverse of fortune in our Affairs in Canada—they are rather alarming, But I still hope our vigorous exertions will be attended with success, Notwithstanding the present unpromising appearances, & that we shall yet acquire & maintain possession of that Country, so important to us in the present contest. I...
Having received Intelligence of the unfortunate death of Genl Thomas, occasioned by the smallpox he had taken, the command of the Army in Canada devolves on you—I am therefore to request your most strenuous exertions to retreive our circumstances in that Quarter from the melancholy situation they are now in and for performing the arduous Task, of bringing order out of confusion. I confess...
I was favoured with yours of the 5th & 6th Instt by Express yesterday evening from Genl Schuyler, and am exceedingly happy on account of the agreable and Interesting Intelligence It contains. Before It came to hand, I almost dreaded to hear from Canada, as my advices seemed to promise nothing favourable, but rather our farther misfortunes—But I am now hopefull that our Affairs from the...
About One OClock to day, I received your Letter of the 13th and sincerely regret with you, the unhappy fate of Genl Lee. I know his feelings upon the occasion, and I know the loss our Country must sustain in his Captivity. The Event has happened & I refer you to the several Letters which I had wrote him, & to one which now goes to Lord Stirling, & to my Lord himself who, I presume, is with you...
As the Information which gave rise to your Remove to the Scotch plains seems to have been void of foundation, and as no great good can result from yr laying in an exposed situation, but much Evil flow from a Surprize (which by the bye I hope never will happen) I can not help expressing my doubts of the propriety of yr removing where the Troops now are (if at the Scotch plains)—Our Affairs at...
The Express delivered me Yr favr this Evening. Ignorant as I am of the ground which you occupy at the Scotch plains, I can not possitively determine whether it is tenable or not. However let me recommend to you to consider maturely whether the Advantages that may accrue from yr neighbourhood to the Enemy, can balance the Consequences that must result from yr being driven from it. ’Tis true yr...
Upon considering the best Mode of distressing the Enemy and rendering their situation still more disagreeable, as well as retarding their early Operations in the Field; I have determined to remove out of their reach all the Horses Waggons & fat Cattle, for which purpose I have appointed Thursday Morning next early for you, Genls Putnam, Warner, & Dickinson to do it. In the mean time you will,...
An Inconvenience of considerable Magnitude arising from the Practice of carrying Household furniture &C. in Waggons & Carts to the Enemy has determined me to direct that in future nothing shall be transported that way—I do not mean to prevent such of the Inhabitants as choose to withdraw within the Enemy’s lines from taking with them all their Apparel & Household furniture as usual if they can...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] March 15, 1777. Exhorts Sullivan not to imagine slights. Discusses separate commands. States that the only separate command is that of the Northern Department. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Do not my dear General Sullivan, torment yourself any longer with imaginary slights, and involve others in the perplexities you feel on that score—No other officer of rank, in the whole army has so often conceived himself neglected—slighted, and ill-treated, as you have done—and none I am sure has had less cause than Yourself to entertain such ideas—mere accidents—things which have occurred in...
You are to repair to Princeton and take upon you the Command of the Troops at that Post. The Troops from Maryland, the lower Counties (on Delaware) and Hazen’s Regiment, together with the Artillery Company, and light Horse now at that place, are to remain there till further orders; all others now there, or that shall hereafter come to that Post (except the Marylanders and such detachments as...
Your favour of Yesterday I have received this morning. As Genl Greene is gone down, with an intention to collect his Division and I dont know what advances he may have made in it, I could not with propriety agree to the change you mention without his approbation; I have wrote to him signifying my assent and desiring him to give you his sentiments upon the occasion. If I have made a mistake in...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] May 29, 1777. Orders Sullivan to send intelligence concerning the enemy as rapidly as possible. Repeats orders for rerouting men and wagons. States that John Parke Custis is not to come by the usual road. LS , in writing of H, postscript in the writing of George Washington, George Washington Photostats, Library of Congress. Custis was Martha Washington’s son by her...
Letter not found: to Maj. Gen. John Sullivan, 29 May 1777. GW wrote Sullivan on this date : “I wrote to you this morning.”
I received your favour of this date. It is of the greatest moment that the motions of the enemy on the quarter you mention, should be narrowly watched; and every step they take known by me as early as possible. I am strongly apprehensive they will shortly push for Philadelphia by water, and the counteracting their scheme will intirely depend upon my having instant intelligence of every thing...
In consequence of your representation I yesterday detatched Lt Colo. Barber with 150 Men and some Horse to Sommerset Court House. I wish you would use your endeavours to encourage the Militia between Brunswic and the Delaware to be ready to assemble and give their Assistance provided the Enemy attempt to march thro’ the Country, which they intend to do from all our late Accounts. The inclosed...
I have yours of the 5th: I agree with you that Colo. Blands Men being natives are more to be depended upon than Colo. Moylans, but the Virginia Regiment of Horse has been so detatched the whole Winter, that I could not deny Colo. Bland his request to draw them together that they may be properly equipped, which they have never yet been. In point of opportunities of deserting there is full as...
I have yours of yesterday with Colonel Formans letter inclosed. If the Ships that went out are intended for Delaware Bay, the Troops at Brunswic and Amboy will either follow immediately by Sea or wait till they hear of their arrival in the Bay and then make a sudden march to meet them. The Flag upon the Tree was seen yesterday, but if you will hoist it about half way up the Body, it will be...
Yours of yesterday evening was delivered to me early this Morning. Every account confirms the certainty of the Enemy’s intention to move by land, and I think it will from appearances take place in a very short time. Govr Livingston, in a letter of the 9th instant, informs me that he had ordered the Militia of Gloucester, Salem and Cumberland to assemble at Mount Holly and that Colo. Bowes Reed...
I am uneasy at hearing nothing from you. The Enemy have advanced a party, said to be two thousand, as far as Van Ests Mill upon Millstone River. They have been skirmishing with Colo. Morgans Rifle Men, but have halted on a peice of high Ground. Some Accounts say that their main Body has marched by the Brunswic Road towards princetown but by neither seeing your Signals nor hearing from you I am...
I am favd with yours of this morning. Upon considering your Situation, the General Officers are of opinion, that while you remain upon their left Flank of the Enemy it is always in their Power by pushing briskly towards the Delaware to cut you off from joining this Army or perhaps of crossing the River. But if you cross their Front and get upon their right Flank you can always form a junction...
I have both your favs. of this day, by the last of which I find that you had arrived at Fleming town, and am happy to hear that the Militia join you in such Numbers, and are in so good Spirits. I would have you leave your Artillery and Baggage upon some secure and strong Ground under a proper Guard, and move with the remainder of your force to some place between Verbrykes Mill on Neshanack and...
I have both your favs. of this Morning. The Enemy last night sent off all their spare Baggage and Women to Brunswic, and the deserters say are preparing for some move, none more probable than an attempt upon this post. Considering the extent of the Ground we have to defend, we want force to make a proper resistance. You will therefore immediately upon the Rect of this detatch one thousand...