You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Hamilton, Alexander
  • Period

    • Revolutionary War

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
Results 151-200 of 807 sorted by relevance
The Subscriber has received nothing for the month of August, on account of the quota of this state for the present year. Published agreeable to the instructions of the Superintendant of Finance. The New-York Packet. And the American Advertiser , September 5, 1782. H wrote the same letter to the Packet on August 1, 1782 .
[ Great Egg Harbor Landing, New Jersey, November 1, 1779. On November 8, Brigadier General Du Portail and Hamilton wrote to Washington : “We hope before this you will have received our two letters of the 26th of October and 1st instant.” Letter of November 1 not found .]
It is his Excellency’s desire, that you have an immediate inspection made into the state of the mens arms and accoutrements, belonging to your division; and take effectual measures to have them put into the best order possible. Also to have your men completed to their proper complement of ammunition, strictly injoining the greatest care to avoid all wanton and unnecessary waste. I am Sir  ...
The Commander in chief positively requires all officers, absent from camp, belonging to the Troops of the State of Virginia, except those who are detained on Public service, by his Excellency the Govr of that State, or any Genl officer of the same, or those who may have furloughs not yet expired—immediately to join their respective Corps. By his Excellys Command The several Printers of the...
I am in Philadelphia on some business of great importance to the army; to execute which I stand in need of a party of about 100 men which are not readily to be procured here. If Your Excy. will be pleased to order over such a party under good active officers, you will equally serve the public & oblige.   Yr. Excy’s   Most Obed servt. ALS , Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston.
[ West Point, September 12, 1779. On September 18, 1779, Jay wrote to Hamilton : “Your favors of the 25, 26, & 30 July & 12 Inst have thus long remained unanswered.” Letter of September 12 not found .]
His Excellency has examined your Provision report; and finds every part of it very well, except that relating to the placing a quantity at Trenton. This is the most improper place in the world; for if the enemy should move towards Philadelphia the provisions at trentown in the hurry occasioned by such an event would inevitably fall into their hands. You will therefore without loss of time have...
I have taken the General’s orders on the subject of your letter of the 24th. As Colo. Hay’s oxen appear to have been converted to the public use, justice requires they should be replaced to him—as it is not known certainly in what manner they were used and as it is not material to the public from what departments the compensation comes. The General directs that the quarter master general will...
[ Philadelphia, February 1, 1782. The description of this letter reads: “Alexander Hamilton, to Col. Wadsworth, begging the loan of one hundred pounds.” Letter not found. ] “Original Correspondence of Colonel Jeremiah Wadsworth of Hartford, Connecticut, Commissary General of the Continental Army.” Items offered for sale by William Todd (Jeremiah Wadsworth Papers, MS Division, New York Public...
It is with the utmost chagrin I am obliged to inform you, that I am not able to return you all your pamph[l]ets; and what is still worse the most valuable of them is missing. I beg you will not impute it to carelessness; for I assure you upon my honor the true state of the case is this—I put your pamphlets in the case with my other books; and some person about the College got into my room...
Headquarters [ Middle Brook, New Jersey ] December 20 [ 1778 ]. Requests minutes of trials of Charles Lee and Arthur St. Clair so that they can be published in general orders. ALS , Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Lee was “suspended from any command in the Armies of the United States of North America for the term of twelve months.” St. Clair was acquitted ( GW John C....
[ Valley Forge ] April 19, 1778 . States that a horse not fit for service should be returned to a Mr. Sellers, its owner. Signed “A Hamilton ADC.” The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography , XVI (1892), 196.
Capt Christie dispatched by His Excellency The Commander in Chief on very important business is hereby authorised to impress horses by the way. ALS , Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Christie (also spelled Chrystie) was a captain of the Third Pennsylvania Regiment. On June 4, Washington gave the following instructions to Christie: “To proceed immediately to West-Point. To...
The General desires you on receipt of this to send a party of fifty men to proceed ten miles down the River road beyond to the ferry to give security to the guards who are conducting the prisoners to Head Quarters on an upper route. I am Yr most Obedt servant NN .
By His Excellencys Command, I am to desire you will give orders upon the deputy Clothier General at Peeks-Kill, for the necessary supply of Cloathing &c. for the four companies raising under your direction. It is not however intended, that more shall be drawn than a sufficiency for the number of men actually inlisted. I am Sir   Your most Obedt servant ADfS , George Washington Papers, Library...
General Howe has just made a proposition, towards a general exchange of prisoners, or rather has acceded to our former propositions on that subject. His Excellency commands me to inform you of this and to desire your immediate attendance at Camp, which is indispensably necessary. I am with great regard   Dr Sir   Your most Obdt serv ADfS , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress....
Mr. Hamilton presents his Complements to General Irvin, wishes to converse with him on a particular subject, for which purpose he will call at his lodgings tomorrow Morning at Nine oClock December 1 AL , Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.
[ February 14, 1777. In a letter to Hamilton dated April 31, 1777 April–May, 1777, Knox wrote: “I could not omit acknowledging the receipt of you⟨r⟩ Very Circumstantial and Satisfactory Letter of the 14th. Feby.” Letter not found. ] MS is misdated April 31, 1777.
[ Bergen County, New Jersey ] September 11, 1780 . “His Excellency desires you will furnish from your Brigade a subaltern for the Company of light infantry in Col Cortland’s regiment.” ALS , MS Division, New York Public Library. Colonel Philip Van Cortlandt, Second New York Regiment.
[ Philadelphia, April 23, 1783. On May 4, 1783, Schuyler wrote to Hamilton : “Your several favors of the 18th & 25th March and 2d. ult: were delivered me … that of the 23d April I had the pleasure to receive yesterday.” Letter of April 23 not found. ]
Perhaps before this reaches you, you will have heard that the British have impliedly acknowleged our independence—by giving a commission of the 23d. of September to Mr Oswald to treat with The thirteen United States of America . Many are sanguine in expecting that peace will be the result of the Negotiations, for my part I have hopes, but if it should not be the case I shall not be much...
I have the honor to acknowlege the receipt of your letter of the 29th. of August; the contents of which shall be executed. I have just received by the post accounts of the specific supplies furnished by this state; copies of which I shall prepare to be transmitted to you by the next post, as I am to return the Originals, which are for the inspection of the legislature. I hope to add to these...
We have the honor to inclose for Your Excellency and the Council a copy of the resolutions communicated in our conference yesterday. Having then fully entered into all the explanations which were necessary on the subject, we shall not trouble your Excellency with a recapitulation. But as the object is of a delicate and important nature, we think it our duty to request the determination of the...
I take the liberty my Dear Sir to request your interest for a friend of mine and a member of the family, Dr McHenry. He wishes to quit a Station which among foreigners is not viewed in a very reputable light and to get into one more military. He will go into the Marquis’s family as an aide. He has been in the army since the commencement of the War—first in the medical line, since the 15th of...
I have been honord this week with your letters of the 28 August 6th. 12th and 17th instant with their inclosures. It gives me the most real pleasure to find that my past communications have meet your approbation; and I feel a particular satisfaction in the friendly confidence which your letters manifest. I am persuaded that substanial reasons have determined your choice in a particular...
As the enemy appear from different Quarters to be in motion it is necessary that the army be in readiness to march, it is therefore ordered that the tents be immediately struck—the baggage and camp equipage loaded—the horses to the Waggons and all the men at their respective incampments paraded and ready to march at a moments warning. ALS , University of California at Berkeley. Lincoln, who...
Your Excellency will, I am persuaded, readily admit the force of this sentiment, that though it is the duty of a good citizen to devote his services to the public, when it has occasion for them, he cannot with propriety, or delicacy to himself, obtrude them, when it either has, or appears to have none. The difficuties I experienced last campaign in obtaining a command will not suffer me to...
You will see that Mr. Farge is a man in distress. The General has given him an order to draw rations. From his situation he cannot draw them dayly. Can you advance him for two or three months at a time? This is wholly private. Yrs. with great regard ALS , Harvard College Library. Stewart was commissary general of issues. Accompanying this letter is an enclosure written and signed by H which...
I am sorry that for want of a person to send them with, I have been obliged to detain your horses till now. The articles I shall want from Duychinks are: four pint decanters if to be had, if not two Quart do. a dozen wine glasses two ale-glasses to hold about a pint each, if not to be had, two tumblers. You will oblige me by procuring these articles as soon as possible, having them carefully...
I had the honor of writing to your Excellency lately on a very confidential subject and shall be anxious to know as soon as convenient whether the letter got safe to hand. The bearer Shattuck thinks he can point out the means of apprehending Wells & Knowl ton the two persons whom Your Excellency was authorised to have taken into custody. I have desired him to call upon you to disclose the...
When you ask my opinion as a friend, I must always act the part of a true friend, however frequently the advice I give may happen to clash with your feelings justly irritated by injuries which you have not merited. Considering the Board of treasury as so many individuals, the complexion of their letter to you would abundantly justify the asperity of your reply; but considering them as a public...
The following is the address which the Marquis thinks will best answer the purpose—The Right Honorable The Marquis de la Fayette, Marechal de camp of the armies of His Most Christian Majesty and Major General in the Service of the United States. ALS , sold at the Parke-Bernet Galleries, January 20, 1947, Lot 346. Varick was at this time aide-de-camp to Benedict Arnold at West Point. Varick’s...
His Excellency has just rec’d information from Col. Butler, who is stationed at the landing called stoney beach that a party of the Enemy of about 400 Men were on the opposite side of the River apparently with a design to reconnoitre the landing. In consequence of this intelligence, he desires you will as soon as possible to morrow morning advance Genl: Smallwood with his Brigade to the Forest...
His Excellency desires me to acknowledge the Receipt of yours of yesterday, and thank you for the intelligence contained in it. He hopes you will soon be able to send him a confirmation with more certain particulars. I am Dr Sir   Your most Obedt ALS , Mrs. Cecily Symington, Cooperstown, New York. Stewart was commissary general of issues from June 18, 1777, to July, 1782.
The last post brought me your letter of the 25th of July, which I transmitted to Colonel Brooks, accompanied by some inquiries that appeared to me necessary. A copy of my letter to him, and of his answer, are enclosed. You will see that he insists positively on your having made the offensive observation before imputed to you; adds several aggravating particulars to his first relation; and...
His Excellency desires you will put a stop, by every mean in your power to the above practice. Any officer who shall be found impressing this man’s horses without proper authority will be most severely dealt with. I am Sir   Yr. Most Obedt ALS , Coburn Library, Colorado College, Colorado Springs. No addressee is given in the MS, but this letter was presumably addressed to Colonel Henry...
I am directed by The General to inform you in confidence, that the army will march from its present ground as soon as the weather permits. You will make your arrangements accordingly. When the weather clears, if you will call at Head Quarters, you will be informed of the particular disposition. I am D Sir   Yr. Obed ser ALS , MS Division, New York Public Library. Pickering had succeeded Major...
I wrote to Your Excellency a day or two ago by express—Since that a Committee appointed on the communications from you have had a meeting, and find themselves embarrassed. They have requested me to communicate our embarrassments to you in confidence and to ask your private opinion. The army by their resolutions express an expectation that Congress will not disband them previous to a settlement...
In my last letter My Dearest Angel I informed you that there was a greater prospect of activity now than there had been heretofore. I did this to prepare your mind for an event which I am sure will give you pain. I begged your father at the same time to intimate to you by degrees the probability of its taking place. I used this method to prevent a surprise which might be too severe to you. A...
[ Philadelphia, February 24, 1783. The description of this letter reads: “Referring to a plan for carrying the 8th article of the confederation into execution, etc.” Letter not found. ] Luther S. Livingston, ed., American Book-Prices Current (New York, 1906), 717. See the first and second “Continental Congress. Motion on Evaluation of State Lands for Carrying into Effect Article 8 of the...
It is proper I should inform Your Excellency that Congress have lately removed to this place. I cannot enter into a detail of the causes; but I imagine they will shortly be published for the information of the United States. You will have heared of a mutiny among the soldiers stationed in the barracks of Philadelphia, and of their having surrounded the state house where Congress was sitting....
Be so good as to urge the bringing forward the boats; there is no time to be lost. They ought to be with the others by Wednesday evening, if possible. Yr. very hum serv I think I mentioned to you in my first note, that the boats would be by this time at Dobbes ferry. ’Tis there the teams must go. ALS , RG 93, Miscellaneous Records, National Archives. These boats were being assembled for the...
You will see by the inclosed we are too late. Arnold went by water to the Vulture. I shall write to General Greene advising him without making a bustle to be in readiness to march and even to detach a Brigade this way, for though I do not believe the project will go on, it is possible Arnold has made such dispositions with the Garrison as may tempt the enemy in its present weakness to make the...
I thank you Dear Mac for your poetry and your confidence. The piece is a good one—your best. It has wit, which you know is a rare thing. I see by perseverence all ladies may be won. The Muses begin to be civil to you, in spite of Apollo and my prognosis. You know I have often told you, you wrote prose well but had no genius for poetry. I retract. Adieu. Steiner, James McHenry Bernard C....
Your two favours both of the 22d came to hand yesterday. His Excellency had been all the day out reconnoitring the country and did not return home ’till late in the evening; this morning he again went out upon the same business, and has desired me to acknowlege the receipt of your letters. The signal advantages gained over the enemy by Generals, Stark and Herkemar at so gloomy and distressing...
I am extremely anxious to get across to Head Quarters this night and it seems hardly possible to cross the river here or not without great risk. I wish to hire a couple of horses one for myself and one for my servant to cross the river at West Point with a guide to conduct us across the Mountain. I will pay him handsomely for his trouble. You will oblige me singularly if you can assist me upon...
By inquiry, I have learned that General Patterson’s brigade, which is the one you propose to send is, by far, the weakest of the three now here, and does not consist of more than about 600 rank and file fit for duty. It is true there is a militia regiment with it of about 200, but the term of service for which this regiment is engaged is so near expiring, that it would be past by the time the...
I wrote you, my dear, in one of my letters that I had written to our father, but had not heard of him since, that the operations in the islands hitherto cannot affect him, that I had pressed him to come to America after the peace. A gentleman going to the island where he is, will in a few days afford me a safe opportunity to write again. I shall again present him with his black-eyed daughter,...
The General is very anxious to hear from you and that your corps should join the army. Your men must have suffered exceedingly yesterday and last night, and your baggage is here. Be with us as soon as you can; but send the express back immediately with an account of your success. Yrs. Affectionately ADfS , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Lafayette was on a reconnaissance in the...
The inclosed I write more in a public than in a private capacity. Here I write as a citizen zealous for the true happiness of this country, as a soldier who feels what is due to an army which has suffered everything and done much for the safety of America. I sincerly wish ingratitude was not so natural to the human heart as it is. I sincerely wish there were no seeds of it in those who direct...