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I have received your line with an inclosure the 24th. ultimo, wrote to the partys, and am now busey in putting forward four of the Horses requird by my new Correspondant. By the time limited, I hope to send Him a set that will compleat His Carriage. As 17 or 18 have been sent from me since the 6th of last mo., I hope a considerable part of them will answer and give a good temporary lift. A...
By His Excellys. command I am to request you will be pleased to put General Hands brigade under marching orders to move by break of day tomorrow morning. He will see General Greene and take orders from him. An impress of waggons is the object. I have the honor to be with the truest attacht. Yr Lordships Most Obedt. serv. ALS , MS Division, New York Public Library. Brigadier General Edward...
I communicated your Lordship’s letter to his Excellency. He has desired me to send Capt Scott’s company their dismission, which you will therefore be pleased to give them, on the expiration of their time. General Green will bring you an answer to your letter respecting Mr. Willcox’s, by which you will perceive that his Excellency has approved, and that I have written to Mr. Willcox agreeable...
Since the giving my evidence at the Court Martial, I have been endeavouring to recollect more particularly the import of the conversation between General Lee and myself, that happened in the field the day of the action and which was the subject of discussion yesterday, before the Court. My memory will not serve me on the occasion, in so clear a manner, as I could wish; but I have been able to...
The General approves your proposed order and requests you to forward a copy to the respective guard—Tomorrow in general orders, they and the militia will be directed to take their orders from you. Bedkins corps is instructed to join you for the purpose of vedets. I have the honor to be Yr Lordships hum. s. NjP .
By His Excelly’s command I am to request, You will be pleased to put General Hands brigade under marching orders to move by break of day tomorrow morning. He will see General Greene and take orders from him. An impress of waggons is the object. I have the honor to be with the truest attach men t Yr Lordships Most Obedt ser. NN : Myers Collection.
His Excellency desires me to inform you, that the Congress have been pleased, to appoint Monsieur Le Baron D.’Arondhl, colonel of the regiment, to which you belong. He conceives both the honor and advantage of the regiment, to be promoted by the appointment of a Gentleman to the command of it, so respectable by birth, the honorable Station he fill’d in the service of his Prussian Majesty, and...
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] June 13, 1777. “… Joshua Austin, belonging to the independent company of the State of Connecticut, … appears to be incapable of military service. He is hereby discharged from the Continental army.…” ADS , Connecticut State Library, Hartford.
I inclose you a copy of a warrant to me from The Superintendant of Finance on the Treasury of this State for the sum due the 1st day of April last as the first quarte[r]ly payment of the quota of the present year. I shall be obliged to you to inform me what appropriations have been made by the Legislature of the State on this account; and I am at the same time to request the payment of such...
I have the pleasure to inform you that the Commanding Officer on Staten Island has agreed to the proposed exchange of papers; and the inclosed are a commencement of the plan. They contain nothing. We have several rumours from New York of accounts received there that affairs to the Southward the last of April or the beginning of May were in statu quo; the enemy had made no material progress...
I have the honor to inclose you several late papers from New York. We have not yet gotten into a right train, but I am promised for the future that if the papers are forwarded regularly on our part, the exchanges will be made with regularity. I am sorry to inform you that a Hand-bill was published at New York dated the 29th. by authority giving an account of the surrender of Charles-Town with...
The first step to reformation as well in an administration as in an individual is to be sensible of our faults. This begins to be our case; and there are several symptoms that please me at this juncture. But we are so accustomed to doing right by halves, and spoiling a good intention in the execution, that I always wait to see the end of our public arrangements before I venture to expect good...
The day before yesterday I had the honor of your letter of the 29th. of April, transmitting the latest Philadelphia papers. I immediately sent them to the officer commanding on the lines to be exchanged in persuance of the plan which has been preconcerted. The papers expected in return are not yet arrived, the moment they do, they shall be forwarded. ’Tis probable our first experiment may meet...
[ Morristown, New Jersey, May 10, 1780. The description of this letter reads: “Giving military information.” Letter not found. ] Victor Hugo Paltsits, ed., American Book-Prices Current (New York, 1916), 812. François, marquis de Barbé-Marbois.
This would be the most dangerous stroke they could give to our cause. It would not only conciliate the greatest part of the people immediately in their power, but would prepare the minds of their neighbours to yield an early submission. This argument aided by the prevailing eloquence of a military force would become almost irresistible. I would not for the world that the tories throughout the...
In the present state of affairs I know of no certain mode for procuring the release of your Brothers, unless there are naval prisoners in the French department whose situations will apply to theirs. I have however directed our Commissary of Prisoners to use all his influence at least to obtain permission for them to make you a visit at Philadelphia—to ascertain in what light they are...
In my absence from Camp, the Commissary of prisoners has no doubt informed you, that your Brothers were not at New York. I am sorry you were so long kept in suspense about an explanation which without a determined disposition to blunder ought to have been long since obtained. I find, my Dear Sir, on the experiment in several ways, that I cannot regularly procure the New York papers in exchange...
I communicated My Dear Sir to the General your ideas of an union between the patriotic males and females; which he relished so well that he has taken the first opportunity to write to the Presidentess recommending it. I hope the proposal may be approved as it will be useful. You will have heard before this gets to hand of the arrival of the Counte De Rochambeau and of the Chevalier De Ternay,...
You have intirely misunderstood me. I said I knew you too well not to be convinced, that you would give fair play; that is in other words my knowlege of you convinced me that you would give fair play . You seem to have taken it in a different sense. Permit me to say this was not well done; for my friendship for you as well as the whole complexion of my letter ought to have saved me from the...
Mr. Garanger has received a second order from the General to make the experiments which were before prescribed him. General Knox he tells me has given him a letter to you to furnish him with the materials and afford him the assistance of which he may stand in need. You will oblige me by facilitating his operations as much as you can; You may depend he will not be introduced into the corps of...
I received your note concerning Mr. Garanger. I am no further interested for him than as a stranger who has taken a great deal of pains to render himself useful & who appears to me to understand what he professes. I know you too well however not to be convinced that you will do every thing in your power to give him fair play. He ought to choose his own means and we should judge of the results....
Not having had the pleasure of hearing from you in answer to my letter of the 18th. of Augt. I now send you a duplicate. I wish at least to be able to let Morris know what prospect I have of fulfilling his views and I therefore shall be indebted to you to let me hear from you on the subject by the first opportunity. I am Sir    Your most Obed ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. A draft...
In obedience to Mr. Morris’s instructions I lately wrote to His Excellency The Governor requesting information on a variety of matters, which it is of great importance to the Financier and to the public to know. The Governor in his answer tells me that the returns lately made by different public officers and on the files of the Legislature will answer most of the questions stated by me. The...
I inclose you a letter for Mr. Writtenhouse accompanied by a Theodolite which you will be pleased carefully to forward him for The General. (Now on my own account) Gibbs informs me you were obliging enough to promise that care should be taken of my mare and her colt at your place. I leave her in charge of Mr. Wallace as my servant will be too much employed while we stay to carry her to your...
The whole army immediately to strike their tents, pack them up, and get themselves in every respect ready for an instant march. The Quarter Master General to have every thing in his department ready. Colonel Biddle will communicate the above order, to the Commissary & Pay Master General & Judge advocate. ALS , MS Division, New York Public Library. Although George Washington anticipated a...
Mr. Laurence who will deliver you this, is I am informed, a character that by his attachment to the cause, his suffering, &c. has a claim to all the indulgence we can show him with consistency. All his grass is gone. He expects soon to have his hay taken away and then he says his cattle and his family in consequence must starve. If you can manage to spare him without incurring the charge of...
There is to be an interview at Elizabeth Town the 19th. between General Lincoln General Philips, The British & American Commissaries of Prisoners. You will endeavour to provide them, with forage, and for this purpose if you please, take the directions of General Lincoln. Yr Obed serv. ALS , Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Major General Benjamin Lincoln had been taken prisoner...
Headquarters [ Middle Brook, New Jersey ] December 20 [ 1778 ]. Requests minutes of trials of Charles Lee and Arthur St. Clair so that they can be published in general orders. ALS , Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Lee was “suspended from any command in the Armies of the United States of North America for the term of twelve months.” St. Clair was acquitted ( GW John C....
By His Excellency’s command, I am to request, you will immediately furnish him with an exact return of all the cloaths and materials for cloathing, you have provided in consequence of orders from Congress or the Board of War. This return must also show, what you have delivered, when and to whom, and what now remains in yr. possession. You will be pleased to be as accurate as possible. I am Sir...
[ Ringwood, New Jersey, January 26, 1781. “I accompanied the General to this place on the business of the Jersey revolt. Tomorrow morning it will be brought to a decision.” Letter not found. ] ALS , sold by C. F. Libbie and Company, November 15, 1889, Lot 343. Bland, who had been a colonel First Continental Dragoons, resigned from the service on December 10, 1779. On June 21, 1780, he was...