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Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society, American Philosophical Society <Passy, October 1, 1778: Pay to John Adams 6,000 l.t. and charge the same to the commissioners’ account.> This letter only exists as copied in the account books of JA and WTF . It is published in Taylor, Adams Papers , VII , under Oct. 1; it also appears in Account III described above, XXIII , 19.
You are to go by the shortest Road to Dieppe, and make all the Dispatch possible. At Dieppe enquire for Mr. Baron, Merchant there, and take his Advice whether to go off to the Ship, or to acquaint the Captain with your Arrival send him the Letters you have for him, and desire him to come and meet you on shore. The last is safest for the Intelligence you may obtain, as well as for you, if the...
AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; two copies: National Archives <Passy, November 12, 1778: In view of the magnitude of the alliance between France and the United States, we conceive it would be highly pleasing to our constituents to have a portrait of His Majesty to be kept where Congress sits; if you are of opinion this would give no offense, we request your kind offices to...
Passy, 13 April 1778. printed : JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:52 . In replying to Mercklé’s letter of 26 March ( Cal. Franklin Papers, A.P.S. I. Minis Hays, comp., Calendar of the Papers of Benjamin Franklin in the Library of the American Philosophical Society , Philadelphia, 1908; 5 vols. ,...
LS : National Archives; copies: Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives (two) <Passy, February 10, 1779: As the change in command of the Ranger might be subject to misinterpretation, we hereby certify that your leaving that ship was with our consent and at the express request of M. de Sartine, who desired to employ you in some public service. That Lt. Simpson...
DS : Yale University Library; copies: Library of Congress (two), American Philosophical Society, Massachusetts Historical Society The present document, penned by William Temple Franklin on October 1, was most likely signed by Franklin the same day. It was eventually signed by all the peace commissioners, but not without hesitation (on the part of John Jay) and outright hostility (on the part...
We do not think ourselves authorized to give any Orders concerning the Deductions to be made from the Seamen’s Price money or Wages, of what was advanced to them. The Resolutions of Congress must be complied with as to your Stores and Furniture, we suppose there can be no Difficulty, but that M. Simpson will as he ought to deliver you your private Property upon Request. We are not informed...
L : Harvard University Library Mr. A. Lee is desired to sign and return the enclosed if he approves it. Addressed: A Monsieur / Monsieur Lee M.P.D.E.U. / a sa Maison / A Chaillot Endorsed: Recd. from a Commissionaire on my way from Challiot to Paris, between 6 & 7 OC. in the Eveng., containing a Paper of which the enclosd is an exact Copy. A Lee July 24th. 1778. Returned unsignd at 8 OC. next...
AL : American Philosophical Society Messrs. Franklins and M. Adams are extremely sorry that they were not at home when M. and Mad. de la Freté did them the Honour of calling at Passy. They are engag’d to morrow and every day next Week: but if it should be convenient to M. and Made. de la Freté, they will do themselves the Honour of dining at Suréne on Monday the 18th. Instant, which is the...
Capt. Jones has represented to us his Desire and Intention of returning to the Countess of Selkirk, some Plate which his People took from her house. We apprehend that Congress would not disapprove of this Measure, as far as it should depend upon them; and We therefore consent on the Part of the United States that this Plate should be return’d. This Consent is to be understood to extend no...
We have been honoured with your Letter of the 26th. October, and We request your thank your Excellency, for the prompt and generous manner in which, you have given Liberty to four of our Countrymen, who were among the Prisoners at Dinant. Such Examples of Benevolence can not fail to make a lasting Impression on the American Mind. Since the Recipt of your Excellencys Letter, We have received...
We agree that the Bills drawn on you, by Mr. Williams, and paid by you according to the list herewith transmitted shall be charged to the Public Account of the United States; Mr. Williams to be accountable for the expenditure of all the sayd Sums to Congress or to any Person, or Persons appointed by Congress for that purpose, and to the Commissioners of the United States at the Court of France...
Yours of the fifth instant We have received. We wish better Health to Captain Ayers, and a safe Passage to his Vessell, which is at sea before now no doubt, if not however she is to sail forthwith, without further orders. Your Draughts for the Account inclosed will be duely honoured. But you must distinguish that Part of it, which belongs to Mr. Adams in his private Capacity from the other...
Passy, 22 May 1778. printed: JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:110 . Citing the usual practice under the law of nations of allowing six months after the commencement of hostilities for subjects of both sides to remove their property, Adams and Franklin requested that, if possible, the General Court...
1. Force of his Vessel, Number of Men, &c. 2. What time he left America, and from what Port. 3. What Instructions he had from Congress. 4. If he knows the Contents of his Dispatches. 5. Ask for News, and Newspapers. 6. What Account there was of Differences between Count D’Estaign’s People and those of Boston. 7. Whether he was well supply’d with Necessaries there and Provisions. 8. Whether he...
(I) and (II) ADS : Cornell University Library; copy: Delaware Historical Society Instructions to W T. Franklin You are to go by the shortest Road to Dieppe, and make all the Dispatch possible. At Dieppe enquire for Mr Baron, Merchant there, and take his Advice whether to go off to the Ship, or to acquaint the Captain with your Arrival send him the Letters you have for him, and desire him to...
1778 1778 Octr. 1 Passy Octr. 1. 1778 Sir Pay to the honble. John Adams Esqr., or order the Sum of Six thousand Livres, and Charge the Same to Account of the Commissioners 6000. B. Franklin John Adams Oct. 2 Cabaret for Stationary, per Receipt 84. 10. 6 Washerwomans Account for D. Franklin 78. 12 Dennis Account
We have rec d. the Letter w h you did us the Honor to write on the 18 th. Inst, together with the Passports mentioned in it. His britannic Majesty’s Proclamation of the 14 th. Instant has our entire approbation, and we have the honor of transmitting to you, herewith enclosed, a Declaration perfectly correspondent with it. It appears to us important to both Countries that a System be speedily...
We have the honour to congratulate Congress on the Signature of the Preliminaries of a Peace between the Crown of Great Britain & the United States of America, to be inserted in a definitive Treaty so soon as the Terms between the Crowns of France & Great Britain shall be agreed on. A Copy of the Articles is here inclosed, and we cannot but flatter ourselves; that they will appear to Congress...
Copies: William L. Clements Library, Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives, Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères; press copy of copy and transcript: National Archives Propositions made to Mr Hartley for the definitive Treaty— 1st To omit in the Definitive Treaty the Exception at the End of the 2d Article of the Provisional Treaty: Viz: these Words “Excepting such Islands...
Copies: Library of Congress (two), Massachusetts Historical Society; AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society Mr. Grand, has laid before us, a State of the affairs of the United States under his Care, and the Demands upon him for money to discharge the Bills drawn upon him, are such as to require some assistance from you, if the Demands upon you will admit of it. If therefore, the State of...
Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society (three), National Archives (two), William L. Clements Library, Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères, Library of Congress; press copy of copy: American Philosophical Society; transcript and partial copy: National Archives No. 1. Article It is agreed, that so soon, as his Britannic Majesty shall have withdrawn all his Armies, Garrisons and...
AL : Library of Congress Messrs. Franklin and Adams present their Compliments to Mr. Genet, with Thanks for communicating the Papers, which they will read and consider, and furnish him with such Notes upon them as may occur. In BF ’s hand. We presume BF dated this letter erroneously, for it is in response to Genet’s of the 24th to each of the commissioners. They were as good as their promise;...
Congress will recommend to the Legislature of each of the thirteen States to appoint Commissioners to be under Oath to appraise at a just Value, at this Time the Estates that have been confiscated, and to make Provision, in a reasonable Time, not exceeding two Years for the a Compensation, to those of the Refugees who have not taken an active Part in the War against the United states, and of...
ALS : National Archives The Proposal inclosed, has been transmitted to us by Mr Bridgen, a Gentleman in London, who has been uniformly a Friend to America, and in a Variety of Ways, and at a great Expence has Served her Cause. It is a Project for introducing Copper Coins into the United States, and Seems to Us to merit the early Attention of Congress, to whom We have the Honour to recommend...
Copy and transcript: National Archives <[July 10, 1778: ] We are agreed that Mr. Williams’ bills on you, as listed herewith, be charged to the public account; he will be responsible to Congress or its agent, and to the commissioners, when called upon to render account of his expenditures. Our consent is not to be taken as approbation of his account or to influence the settlement of it. >...
DS : Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives (two), Public Record Office; copies: Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives (two.) Early on the morning of September 3, Benjamin Franklin, John Jay, and William Temple Franklin rode into Paris carrying four official copies of the treaty that would end the War for American Independence. Joined by Adams,...
That the Subjects of his Britannic Majesty and the People of the Said United States, Shall continue to enjoy unmolested, the Right to take Fish of every kind on the gr all the Banks of Newfoundland, in the Gulph of St Lawrence, and all other Places, where the Inhabitants of both Countries used formerly at any Time heretofore, to fish; and also to dry and cure the Same, at the accustomed Places...
Copies: National Archives, William L. Clements Library, Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society; press copy of copy: National Archives The American Ministers Plenipotentiary for making Peace with great Britain, present their Compliments to Mr. Hartley. They regret that Mr. Hartley’s Instructions will not permit him to sign the Definitive Treaty of Peace with America at the Place...
AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; two copies: National Archives <Passy, July 13, 1778: Load the Boston with whatever Capt. Tucker will take, and particularly with as much lead as he can carry and you can supply.> Published in Butterfield, John Adams Diary , IV , 160.
LS : National Archives; copies: Massachusetts Historical Society, South Carolina Historical Society, National Archives (two); two transcripts: National Archives <Passy, November 7, 1778: We enclose copies of our declaration concerning articles 11 and 12 of the Treaty of Commerce, correspondence with M. de Sartine on rescues and recaptures, and correspondence regarding negotiations with the...
AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; two copies: National Archives We have received your Letter dated Paris September 29 1778, with the valuable Present to the united States of America, of a Manuscript Book of the Commissioners of the English Navy, containing a Description of the Dimensions, Guns, Men &c. of most Ships, in Commission at the Time when it was written. We thank you, Sir...
AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; two copies: National Archives We have the Honour of your Excellencys Letter of yesterdays Date, requesting Us to give to the Sieur Fagan all the Security in our Power, for three Vessells, to transport the Merchandises of France to England. We have the Honour to acquaint your Excellency, that we have accordingly given the Sieur Fagan, three...
Copy: Connecticut Historical Society We wrote you the 12 inst. on the Subject of the Letter returned to Mr. Beaumarchais since which we are without any of your favours, except of the 12 inst. which relates to the Sales of the Cargo of the Amphitrite, the acct. of which sales you will please to favour us with a Copy of for our Settlement with that Gentleman. It is a little surprizing that Capt....
We have received your Letter of October the sixth, and wish it was in our Power to do more for officers in your situation than We do, altho that amounts in the whole to a large sum. But as We have al­ ready lent you as much Money as We have lent been able to lend to other officers of your Rank and in your Circumstances, it is not in our Power we cannot without a blameable Partiality to lend...
DS : Boston Public Library Nous Benjamin Franklin, arthur Lée et John adams deputés plenipotentiaires des treize états unis de L’amerique septentrionale pres sa majesté tres chretienne, Prions tous ceux qui sont a prier de vouloir bien laisser passer surement et librement Messieurs Joseph Waldo et Thomas Brattle Ecuyers Americains et Sujets des dits Etats, allant en Angleterre par Calais sans...
AL (draft ): Massachusetts Historical Society; two copies: National Archives <Passy, May 14, 1778: American warships have hitherto taken between four and five hundred prisoners, who were released because we could not confine them in France. Now Capt. Jones has brought into Brest nearly two hundred, whom we should gladly exchange for our seamen in England, but who we fear will be released in...
Copy: National Archives We had the honor of receivg. yr. commands relative to the Portraits taken & carried into Guernsey. We have accordingly written to Mr. S——r at Nantes, who we hope may be able to recover them. As soon as he shall inform us of the success of his endeavors we shall acquaint you with it. We have the honor &c. French minister Gérard’s wife. In Arthur Lee’s hand. Schweighauser.
LS : National Archives; copies: Harvard University Library, South Carolina Historical Society (two); transcript: National Archives <Passy, July 23, 1778: We are informed by the Count de Vergennes that the British cabinet plans to offer independence to the United States if it will make a separate peace. M. de Vergennes requests us to inform Congress that war between Britain and France, though...
Upon reconsidering Job Prince’s Letter, it is observable, that there is not a single Circumstance mention’d in it by which one may be assured that it is either an honest Letter or a Forgery and a Trick to get into their Power from us some Person of Confidence from whom or from the Letters we might write by him they might pick out some useful Intelligence. The releasing a French Fisherman taken...
We have just received a Message from Monsr. Le Comte De Vergennes, by his Secretary, acquainting Us; that Information is received from England of the Intention of the Cabinet there, to offer (by additional Instructions to their Commissioners) Independence to the United States, on Condition of their making a Separate Peace, relying on their Majority in both Houses, for Approbation of the...
Copy: Connecticut Historical Society The quantity of Stores you have on hand and the difficulty you find in shipping them induces us to accept of Mr. Monthieus proposal of taking his Goods out of the Mercury and loading intirely with the Stores of the public. Mr. Montieu has made that offer taking the same rate of Freight for the whole as was agreed for the quantity actually loaded already. We...
Paris, 18 May 1778. printed: JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:102 ; ordered printed by the congress as a broadside (illustration facing p. 99 ). This letter was signed by Adams and Franklin because, according to Arthur Lee in his Letterbook ( PCC , No. 102, IV, f. 7), “this Intelligence was sent...
Articles agreed upon by and between Richard Oswald Esquire the Commissioner of his Britannic Majesty, for treating of Peace with the Commissioners of the United States of America, in behalf of his said Majesty, on the one part; and John Adams Benjamin Franklin, John Jay, ^ and Henry Laurens, ^ four of the Commissioners of the said States for treating of Peace with the Commissioner of his said...
Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society, Library of Congress, National Archives (two) <Passy, January 13, 1779: We received yesterday your letter of the seventh and one from the comte de Vergennes, a copy of which is enclosed. We wrote his Excellency today requesting the convoy be sent to Nantes. We regret the convoy will not be able to go all the way to America, and hope it will continue...
AL : Clements Library, University of Michigan; AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; copy: National Archives <Passy, May 22, 1778: Mr. Joseph Parker of London has asked us to write to you about his property in a vessel that has been in public hands since the spring of 1775. We have reason to think that he is a worthy man, a friend of America; further detention of his property will ruin...
We herewith communicate to your Excellency a Resolution of Congress relative to the Treaties, which we request may be laid before the King. Thereby his Majesty will perceive the unfeigned Sentiments of that Body, as well as those of the whole American People, whose Hearts the King has gained by his great Benevolence towards them, manifested in these Treaties, which has made so deep an...
ALS : Yale University Library; AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; two copies: National Archives <Passy, June 23, 1778: We have a prospect of exchanging prisoners, and want from you a list of all those you have; we will let you know where to send them for exchange. Load as many arms and goods as you safely can; Mr. Schweighauser will provide them. If he has a ship ready for America,...
(I) LS : National Archives; copies: Library of Congress, Harvard University Library; (II) ALS : National Archives; copies: Library of Congress, Harvard University Library; (III) ALS : National Archives; ALS (draft): Library of Congress; copy: Harvard University Library As it is not in our Power to procure you such a Ship as you expected, we advise you after equipping the Ranger in the best...
AL (draft): American Philosophical Society; copies: Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives (two) We have done by our Friends at Amsterdam, who have followed our Orders, every thing that we thought incumbent on us to do relative to your Affairs, and We do not incline to have any further Concern with them. In reply to Merckle’s letter above of March 26, which Lee endorsed as given...