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M r Gimbrede has the honor to offer to M r Jefferson a Little Sketch in Cameo , which if he should deem it worthy of his acceptance, he will please to receive it, as an evidence of my Esteem & high consideration, with an unfeigned wish that in your retirement—you may experience that tranquility & happiness that your usefulness in public Life has so Eminently entitled you to. RC ( DLC );...
I recieved safely your letter of May 30. & with it your astronomical work & Political essay on the kingdom of New Spain , for which I return you my sincere thanks. I had before heard that this work had begun to appear, & the specimen I have recieved proves that it will not disappoint the expectations of the learned. besides making known to us one of the most singular & interesting countries on...
candidates Sec retary of State War Missisi pi Gov r v. Williams Holmes .
In conformity to a resolution entered into by the republican Citizens of Washington County in the State of Maryland , assembled at Hagers Town , we, the Chairman and the Secretary of the meeting, have the honor of transmitting to you the following extract from their proceedings.—we remain with sentiments of the highest esteem and respect N. Rochester W m L. Brent
I have seen in your Cabinet, a Geranium , which I understood you cultivated with your own hands. If you do not take it home with you, I entreat you to leave it with me. I cannot tell you how inexpressibly precious it will be to my heart. It shall be attended with the assiduity of affection & watered, with tears of regret; & each day as I attend it, will I invoke the best blessings of Heaven,...
Th: Jefferson presents his respectful salutations to mrs Smith, and sends her the Geranium she expressed a willingness to recieve. it is in very bad condition, having been neglected latterly as not intended to be removed. he cannot give it his parting blessing more effectually than by consigning it to the nourishing hand of mrs Smith. if plants have sensibility, as the analogy of their...
Th: Jefferson asks the favor of mr Smith to print for him 100. copies of the within letter each on a separate sheet of 4 to letter paper. he would be glad to have them by Thursday evening if practicable. he salutes him with esteem & respect. RC ( DLC : Henley Smith Papers); dateline at foot of text; endorsed by Smith. Not recorded in SJL . Samuel Harrison Smith (1772–1845) was born in...
THE friendship which has long subsisted between the President of the United States and myself gave me reason to expect, on my retirement from office, that I might often receive applications to interpose with him on behalf of persons desiring appointments. Such an abuse of his dispositions towards me would necessarily lead to the loss of them, and to the transforming me from the character of a...
The following packages on Board the Sloop Rebecca for Richmond Jn o Hall Master. One Barrel Muscovado Sugar N t 2 1 4 2—
The enclosed commission will inform you that I have taken the liberty to nominate you to fill the Office of Secretary of War, vacated by the resignation of General Dearborn, and that the Senate have compleated the appointment. I transmit the Commission with a hope that I shall have the pleasure of learning that your Country will have the benefit of your services in that important station. I...
Before this you will have seen the proceedings of the Legislature of this State. It is with much satisfaction I inform you that they are read with indignation and abhorrence by evry friend of the administration. There is but one sentiment among us that they are treasonable in principle. I am confident many very many of our opponents will not justify the measures. We will support the...
The undersigned practising Attornies at law within the Mississippi Territory beg leave respectfully to represent to your excellency that they Consider it Compatible with the privileges of free men to express their Opinions on Subjects interesting to themselves; and the Community in which they live. They have learned that one of the Judges of this Territory has resigned and that, that office is...
James Madison , President of the United States of America To all to whom these Presents shall come, Greeting — Whereas it has been made to appear to me that a certain Negro lad, named Nathan , was, at a Circuit Court of the United States , for the county of Washington in the District of Columbia, holden in December last, duly convicted of a burglary by him committed in the house of Francis...
I hope you will pardon me for soliciting your interposition in favor of the bearer hereof, my son Walter G. Anderson who has been in the Navy of the United States for about six years, which service he did not wish to quit, but from a severe stroke of the paralytic his physicians advise him to do so, and as his narrow circumstances render employment of some kind absolutely necessary, your...
The President of the UStates To John Barnes , 1809. Feb y 8 th for 12 lb dipt Candles @ 20 d 1 0
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Gimbrede and his thanks for the very elegant Cameo he has been so kind as to send him. he considers it as a flattering mark of the indulgence with which mr Gimbrede has been so good as to contemplate his public conduct, and it adds to the consolation he recieves from the testimony of the worthy that the purity of his intentions, at least, has atoned...
On the 28 th of Dec r last , I received your letter of the 14 th in which you are pleased to observe—“that you should have read the book *Horrors of Slavery I sent you with more satisfaction, had you found the author’s position in it more equal to his talents.” All men are fond of receiving satisfaction, and I trust, Sir, you will encrease yours by contributing to make some alteration in my...
Thomas Jefferson Esq r 1807 To Joseph Milligan November 7 th To 1 Malthus on population—2 vols Calf Gilt $ 8 – 00 1808 March 8
I had heard of your illness with extreme concern, from my wife, and also through Mr: Cranch and Mrs. Quincy—The sight of your hand-writing again, has given me the purest joy, though allayed by the evident weakness in which you wrote—I believe there is in the sentence I have just written there is something which might be called a bull —But my feelings both of pleasure and pain at the idea of...
8 March 1809, London. He has written Lord Grenville regarding inconsistencies in the parliamentary debates over the naval blockade, the enforcement of which has exceeded “the rule of the War of 1756.” He attended the debates where Rose and Canning spoke, the latter saying with “the most consummate Impudence” that he would not discuss the state of American negotiations. Joy took “copious Notes”...
The affectionate address of the Republicans of George Town on my retirement from public duty, is received with sincere pleasure. in the review of my political life, which they so indulgently take, if it be found that I have done my duty as other faithful Citizens have done, it is all the merit I claim. Our lot has been cast on an Awful period of human history. the contest which began with us...
It is with much concern I inform you that the Senate has negatived your appointment. we thought it best to keep back the nomination to the close of the session, that the mission might remain secret as long as possible, which you know was our purpose from the beginning. it was then sent in with an explanation of it’s object & motives. we took for granted, if any hesitation should arise, that...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Threlkeld and takes the liberty of asking a few small plants of the English mulberry & peach-Apricot, of which mr Threlkeld thought he could spare some. Th:J. can convey only such & so many as are very portable, & will occupy but little space. he begs leave to present to mr & mrs Threlkeld & family his friendly Adieux, and assurances of his sincere...
M r Threlkeld sends M r Jefferson three English Mulberys on American ones, & five Peach Apricots he reccommends great attention to be paid by the Waggonner to them as the Shoots are but Small in some, & may co me off. M r
Though it is “a terrible thing” for “eyes with reading almost blind” to go over between three and four hundred pages of ms. History, I have read “the General history of the United States” with more delight than it would be prudent for me to express. It is written in the pure spirit of an upright and faithful and impartial American. I see in it none of those panegyrical Romances which compose...
I wrote you on Sunday, and the same Evening I received yours of 26. Feby:—Yesterday yours of the 1st: instt: came to hand—I rejoice to learn that the children are at length perfectly well; and Kitty continues to be admired. I shall be very well satisfied to part with Mr: Gurney as a Tenant, and if he can give me any good security for the payment of his rent, I shall very willingly take it. I...
D 1809. Mar. 9. Balance at the bank in favor of Th: Jefferson 2291. 77½ a warrant from the Treasury 1148. 3439. 77½ Th:J. proposes to draw as follows J. Barnes
Agreeably to your instructions, I have made arrangements to provide the most necessary articles of furniture required for the President’s house. The first and most expensive of these are Looking Glasses of large dimensions. I have already purchased conditionally 3 pair, the largest of which is 8 ft. 6 in in highth, and I have in view one other pair, of very considerable highth & width. The...
The Bearer , one of my Sons attends with the List of furniture to aid M r La Mare in the Delivery of the furniture of the Presidents House to such person as may be authorised by the President of the United States to recieve the same— My son is a smart boy and very capable of assisting in this Business, more especially as he was present at the taking of the inventory—I have told him, Sir, that...
R. Harrison presents his respectful compliments to M r Jefferson , and has the honor to inform him that a Warrant will probably be ready by 2. o’Clock for the balance due on his Account as Min. Plen: at Paris . R. Harrison avails him self of this occasion to offer his sincere thanks to M r Jefferson for his past friendship & civilities; and to wish him every happiness in the retirement he has...
By a vessel just departing hence for Richmond I send a number of packages as by the inclosed , in which however I believe there may be an error or two, for I have not yet got the bill of lading. I must pray you to procure for me 3. dozen stick chairs , of the kind marked in the margin, painted black with yellow rings, & forward them for me to Lynchburg . Couch’s boats are, I believe, the most...
Being just on the eve of my departure for Monticello I must write you a short letter returning you a thousand thanks for the portrait of my grandson , which is indeed inimitably done. I do not know whether age impairs the faculties of your art, but I am sure it would do honor to any period of life. it will be a treasure to his parents & not less so to me. as he wished to see them & had a month...
I rec’d yesterday your favour of the Month of August 1808 and if the following answers to your Questions will be any gratification to your curiosity or any Aid to your Work, they are at your Service. 1. My Father was John Adams, the Son of Joseph Adams the Son of another Joseph Adams, the Son of Henry Adams who all lived independent New England Farmers and died and lie buried in this Town of...
On the first of the month I received your favour of the 22d. ult. with a copy of a speech of a ci-divant Minister to the Six Nations. Having been ill of the prevailing influenza, and expecting, mail after mail, to receive your answer to my letters of the 20th. and 23d. of Feb. I have delayed this acknowledgment. I hope that this evening will relieve my impatience to see the speculations you...
It might be expected that a woman & a stranger shou’d apologize for the freedom of addressing The President Of The United States—but, my dear Sir, I never made an apology in my life, and it wou’d take me longer to frame one than to write the petition which will be the subject of this address. It is in behalf of Col Burr—to whom it is but just to declare, that I act without his authority, or...
Prevented by a severe cold from paying You my Congratulations, personally, on the 4th of March, I requested our mutual Friend Mr Deblois to present them, hoping, ere’ this day, to have had the pleasure of renewing them myself. As the weather & roads still keep me from that satisfaction, I cannot longer delay begging You to accept my sincere professions of Joy on Your being placed at the Head...
11 March 1809, London. Reports that at least eight ships from America have recently arrived in a British port in violation of the Embargo. Seeks appointment for himself and Samuel Williams as commercial agents for U.S. in London. Williams is known as an honorable man on the exchange and would be a valuable representative, particularly if Joy’s business took him elsewhere. RC ( DNA : RG 59,...
11 March 1809, New Orleans. Congratulates JM upon his inauguration and asks for the same “Solicitude paternelle” for the convent’s work in educating the young as was enjoyed during the Jefferson administration. RC ( DLC ). 2 pp. Written in French and signed: “ Sr. de St. Xavier farjon / Superieure des Religieuses ursuline .” Docketed by JM. Enclosed in W. C. C. Claiborne to JM, 20 Mar. 1809 .
The Inhabitants of Albemarle , your fellow citizens & your friends, beg leave to congratulate you on your return to themselves & to your native county. They invite you to the enjoyment of that domestic happiness from which your public services have so long abstracted you, & for which you have so just a claim on their warmest wishes, & best exertions to establish. In the bosom of your family,...
By the post of this day I inclose to the President of the bank of Fredericksburg five hundred & ninety dollars on account of the hire of your negroes and subject to the order of yourself and miss Dangerfield , and tender you the assurances of my great respect. PoC ( MHi ); at foot of text: “M rs Dangerfield”; endorsed by TJ. Mary Willis Daingerfield (1745–1818), widow of Continental army...
Such has been the hurry & bustle of the close of a session of Congress & of my departure, which now takes place in an hour that I have not been able to acknolege the re ciept of your letters, but I did what was essential as to the most important one. I consulted with Gen l Dearborne and we concluded that the public service permitted the indulgence and the proceeding which would accomodate your...
I ought before this to have acknoleged the reciept of two or three letters from you, but the hurry of a close of Congress and bustle of my own departure which takes place in an hour, has prevented me. yours of Feb. 15. is just now recieved, & I hasten to inclose you an order of the bank of the US. here on that at Boston for 45.62 D to reimburse what you have been so kind as to pay for me for...
The non-intercourse law prohibiting the importation of any thing from France directly, I must still rely on the indirect importation from Amsterdam . making no use therefore of the letter to mr Backer which you were so kind as to send me, I now return it with a renewal of my request that you will suffer your former orders for the books to go into execution, and the tender of assurances of my...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Shattuc k and his thanks for the copy of the Boylston prize dissertation w hich he was so kind as to send him. he shall read it with pleasure in the leisure of Monticello , to which place he is now in the moment of departure. he prays mr Shattu ck to accept the assurances of his respect. PoC (
Last night I received your kind favour of the 4th: instt: with the information the most delightful to my feelings, that my mother is recovering still, that the children are well, and that I may hope to find you so, upon my return.—May God Almighty grant that this hope may be realized. This is the last Letter which I purpose to write you from this place—Yesterday the Supreme Court delivered...
Immediately after the affair of the Chesapeake (July 4th.) I went to Mr. Jefferson, making him a tender of my personal services. As our country seems yet to be menaced by foreign powers, I still hold it my duty to continue that offer, which I now do to you as President of the United States. I do it the more cheerfully because I am not unknown to you personally. I shall always feel a sincere...
Previously to the establishment of arrangements for carrying on the work during the ensuing Season, I beg to lay before you a proposition of which I hope to receive your approbation, and which I beg specially to explain on account of the personal interest I appear to have in it. Independently of my Salary, the expenses of the direction of the public works have been, Salary of the Clerk of the...
12 March 1809, Philadelphia. Asks that his stepson be appointed an official courier to carry diplomatic dispatches to England. Requests that Mrs. Madison “have the goodness, after mentioning the Matter to the President, to inform Mrs. Lewis or me, whether the appointment has been made or not, And if it has not; in what manner an application for it should be made.” RC ( DLC : Dolley Madison...
I have received your very civil Letter of the third of this Month with Emotions very similar to those which I felt, many years ago upon the following Occasion.— Returning from Holland to Paris in 177 8 4 I was invited to dine with my Wife and Daughter by the Baron De Stael, Ambassador from Sweeden, As I was the first of the Corps Diplomatic who arrived, the Ambassador was shewing me a fine...
When a young man I read Sidney upon government. In one of his Chapters, he agitates the following question—“Whether A civil War, or slavery be the greatest evil” and decides in favor of the Latter. In ing and revolving that Subject in my mind, I have been led to suppose there are evils more afflicting and injurious to a Country than a foreign War. The principal evil of War is death. Now Vice I...