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My Pen is occupied on a narrative, intended for posterity, in which I am desirous to incorporate, every act & incident of my publick Life, which may denote Zeal, & demonstrate Patriotism. Pending my last most unrighteous & fatal Persecution, my solicitude to contribute my humble services, to the common defense, impelled me to petition you, for a prompt trial, agreably to the provisions of the...
Some very interesting domestick concerns which could not well be postponed, seconded by the state of the wound on my leg, prevented my having the pleasure of waiting on you in the last week, but I shall be with you to morrow if no accident presents an obstacle to it. I shall bring all the papers with me which it will be necessary to submit to your view at this time. Indeed many things have...
On the 2d instant I had the honor of continuing to you the tender of my services in the situation I so long have held in this port, as Consul of the United States. I now respectfully repeat the same tender, with the assurance of the satisfaction it ever has afforded me, & ever will afford me, of being useful to my countrymen. During the war I have, from time to time, written to you on the...
I have nothing from you to day. Col Cass has arrivd & gives the same acct. heretofore recd. from others of the surrender of Detroit. Genl Cushing thinks that a power to grant a volunteer comn., to give effect to the law, is a necessary construction of it. I shall, unless some other view be taken in the course of the day, accept such a comn. & set out in discharge of it, in a few days. A short...
At a meeting at the Department of State, Mr. Monroe brought under consideration the Algerine case, and the case of the Whaling vessels in the Pacific. He will communicate the result in both cases; but I find, upon an explanation, that only one of the Whaling vessels is known to have been seized by the Spaniards, though there are 24 at risque. The dispatch from Mr. Harris is an unpleasant one;...
18 May 1810, Augusta. Thanks JM for his “friendly letter [not found] … in reply to one which I took the liberty to address to you from Portland.” Plans to spend several months in Kentucky, in “seclusion & solitary study,” to work on a series of orations: “‘The Progress & Prospects of society in the U.S.’—‘The Licentiousness of the Press & the most eligible & probably efficient corrective of...
§ From James Kilbourn. 24 December 1813, Washington. “Being absent when the other members of the Ohio Representation forwarded their recommendations of a person for the Marshals Office in the District of Ohio, and being willing to take an equal responsibillity on myself in that respect with my Colleagues I have thought it proper in this manner to suggest, that I consider Doctr. John Hamm of...
Lieutenant Stewart when delivering to you this letter, will at the same time present for your acceptance, a specimen of the cloth made at the Steubenville Woolen factory lately established by Mr. Wells, Mr. Baldwin & myself, and managed entirely by Mr. Orth an excellent Artist from Aix-la-Chapelle. We flatter ourselves, that the texture, colour, & dressing of this cloth, will justify the good...
In a late communication I did myself the Honor to apprise you that I had taken the field as Commander in Cheif. Every practicable exertion is now making to place the State in an efficient posture of defence. For this purpose large requisitions have been made on the Militia, which added to the former requisitions, made since the commencement of the war, has produced a call amounting to nearly...
Permit me honor’d Sir, to call your attention,& request that you will peruse this, when the hours of business have ceas’d their temporary influence. I was bred up in the Counting House of Mr. Jacob Barker of New York. I Serv’d him nine years, two of which I was at France & Spain; for the purpose of extending largely; his great Commercial views; as well as my own interests. After having been...
I enclose you a copy of a letter sent yesterday to genl. winder, relating to the communication between Col. P. & Col: Baynes, which were forwarded to you a day or two before. A stronger paper was authorised by the heads of depts., but I afterwards moderated the terms, retaining the sense. The distinction in it, is so obvious, between the passage which expresses, the sense of the govt. on...
I send you letters from General Jackson which give an account of a victory truly glorious. It will be well to send them to Gales, except that which I have marked to be retained—unless indeed so much of the letter of the 9th. as relates to the conduct of the Kentuckey militia should also be retaind, tho I do not see how it can be, as similar statments will soon force themselves on the public RC...
29 July 1812, Shelbyville, Kentucky. Is authorized by the Kentucky volunteer cavalry regiment to offer their services to march as soon as possible “to Canada or any other point where our Services may be wanting.” This regiment “is upwards of 400 strong they are well acquipt in everry thing but arms.” Has been informed by Col. John Allen that his regiment was named in Allen’s letter to JM. He...
In the Year 1807 the General Assembly of Tennessee established a College in the Vicinity of this Place and at the same time endowed it with the profits arising from the proceeds of the Sale of one half of the Land appropriated by an Act of Congress of the United States for the Support of Two Colleges one in East and the other in West Tennessee. If East Tennessee College had the Necessary...
I am requested by Mr Joy to forward the inclosed. I wish there was a better prospect than now presents for amicable adjustment between our country & this. It daily appears more & more the determination of administration to continue the orders in council; yet petitions for their revocation increase; as do the prices of Grain & other articles of food, which, adding to the distresses of...
22 June 1812, Madeira. Solicited an appointment to the Lisbon consulate in June and July 1811, “should it again become vacant.” Has been informed that Mr. [George] Jefferson resigned the post due to ill health. “May I hope that my expectations will not be disappointed & that I may at last have a prospect of educating my family in a manner equal to my wishes.… I have only to add that my...
I have yours of the 23 d. Col: Aspinwall is desirous of obtaining the appointment to London as you were apprizd before you left us. The principal competitors are Col: Drayton & Com: Barney. The loss of his arm gives him I think a stronger claim than either of the others, and will perhaps reconcile both of them to his appointment. His appointment would open a place in the army for some other...
I hope you will excuse the liberty I have taken to address you on the followin[g] subject; but situated as we are at present with this armament of England at our doors, and our sea port towns in danger of being destroyed, the inhabitants reduced to the greatest inconvenience and distress, I hope will be a sufficient apology—moreover it is the duty of every good Citizen to use every exertion...
11 July 1811, Boston. Asks if JM can spare the time to read the enclosed pamphlet, written by “a zealous admirer of his administration.” RC ( DLC ). 1 p. Austin very likely enclosed a copy of his pamphlet, written under the pseudonym of “Leolin” and published on 30 June 1811, Resistance to the Laws of the United States; Considered in Four Letters to the Honorable Harrison Gray Otis (Boston,...
I have been much engaged in my private concerns, tho’ rather indisposed, since my return home, so that I have not been able to enter on any serious business. I shall begin to day to take up the most pressing. I retain for the present Sodestroms comns., believing that their effect will be to license a trade with the enemy. I return the letters of the Secry at war and of the navy. Respectfully &...
I have not had the Honour as yet of ⟨r⟩eceiving any Communication from your Excellency, but presume I shall ⟨n⟩ot much longer remain without the wished for Correspondence ⟨f⟩rom the usual Department of Government. The Object of the present is, to notice to ⟨y⟩our Excellency, that, since the renewal of Intercourse & Trade ⟨b⟩etween the United States & this port, I have remarked a great Degr⟨ee...
I trouble you with a draft of the agreement with Mr. Hassler relative to the survey of the coast. The work is an important one, and must require both time and money to complete it. I am confident that Mr. Hassler is the only person equal in all respects to the undertaking, within the reach of the government. The circular to the banks is prepared for issuing, and the prospect of an accumulation...
I return’d here yesterday morning, having been prevented arriving the preceding evening by the rain. The case with Algiers is interesting. The sentiments expressed in your letter of the 25th. which I have just received, accord in every circumstance, with those of the gentlemen in the admin. here. Anxious to communicate theirs, to you, we had an informal meeting on the subject yesterday, in...
Permit me to introduce to your acquaintance Genl. James Findlay a particular friend of mine. The Genl. Commanded one of the Regiments from this state who were unfortunately Compeled to surrender prisoners of War at Detroit on the 16t. August. The Genl. has been induced to take Niagara and Genl. Dearborns head Quarter in his way to the City of Washington. I refer you to Genl. F for any...
I had the pleasure of seeing Govr. Howard lately and was much pleased in hearing from his own lips an account of his efforts in protecting the frontier of his Territory. Would it not be well to confer the rank of Brigadier Genl on Gov Howard. He is a Military Man & it appears to me that all the Troops in his Territory ought to be under his command. He would accept of it & receive either the...
My affairs in Loudoun requiring in an urgent manner my presence, I shall go up to day & return on monday or tuesday next. A passport from the British Commander to take dispatches to Ghent being as I presume necessary, I have arrang’d in the dept. a letter to him for the purpose. I know of nothing that will suffer in my short absence. Respectfully your friend RC ( DLC : Rives Collection,...
I am informed that application will be made to you in favor of a Mr. Sloo for an appointment as Indian Agent. He informs me that he was in the revolutionary army from nearly the beginning to the close in the quarter Master department, & that his father was an officer during I think the whole War. I have known Mr. Sloo for a number of years slightly but not well enough to speak of my own...
I have taken the liberty of recommending to the Hon. Secry of War among other persons to be appointed officers from Kentucky. Hubbard Taylor Jr son of my brother for the appointment of Captain and Nathl. Pendleton Taylor for the same appointment should there be vacancies, I believe you saw Hubbard on his return from Litchfield, He has for several years devoted himself to the Study of the Law...
I had an interview with Mr Bagot yesterday on the subject of the fisheries. He proposes, to allot for our use, a certain tract on the Labrador shore, lying between Mt. Joli & the strait of Belle Isle, the Esquimaux bay, a distance of more than 150 miles, being between 2. and 3. degrees. Ships which descend the St. Lawrence pass, generally, I believe, thro this strait by Mt. Joli. His idea is,...
As the fiercest Tyrant and the mildest philosopher possess equally the power of self-examination, so the whole human race may be allowed to search after the source of Life & of Morals. Such search, conducted by Reason, and proceeding downwards from the branching-ends of both those Trees, will assuredly find only the single common tap-root to be Self-Love. As no President of these United States...
I must once more take the Liberty of requesting your Attention to a Solicitation on Behalf of others. My Son in Law, Mr Robert G. Scott, Son of Genl Scott of Georgia, is anxious to be appointed Collector of the Revenue for the District in which Williamsburg, & the adjacent Counties may fall, according to Mr Gallatins proposed Division of the States; provided such a Measure shall be adopted by...
We came here on sunday & shall proceed to Richmond the day after to morrow. We left washington on saturday. We concurr’d in the opinion suggested in your letter that it would be proper to execute the law for reducing the army, and to permit the squadron to sail for the mediteranean, with instructions to keep a look out as to events, & the mov’ment of the fleets of other powers. These measures...
I James N. Edmonston wishes to be appointed as a chain carer to run the Divideing line between the american contenent & that of cannada as I am informed that the presedent of the united States is invested with power to anomenate and appoint such as he may deem it his Pleasure feeling myself quite Resolved to Explore the country and from the pratice I have had feel myself quite competent of...
11 July 1811, New York. Expresses his disappointment at receiving JM’s letter of 5 July . Explains his circumstances and background for the benefit of the secretary of the navy, who “may probably be ignorant of my history.” Gives an account of his life, beginning with the collection he made in Great Britain for Columbia College before the Revolution and his decision to support the cause in...
The Revd. John H. Rice called on me today, with a view that I might present him to you. He is on his way to New York, to attend a general meeting of the bible societies of the UStates, and the object of his call was, to solicit such countenance to them, as yourself & the others, in the principal offices of the govt., might be disposed to give, not as members of the govt., but individuals...
I have not yet heard from Mr Crowninshield, and I begin to fear that Mr Bagot’s power relative to the arming on the lakes is of a very limited nature. Finding many admonitions that my constitution does not accord with this climate, I must move to a higher surface. I shall therefore go to Loudoun, transacting by letter thence, all that can be managed in that way, as indeed most of the business...
I returnd last night and receivd your letters of the 7th. & 8th. The letter of the Dey of Algiers, is sent to Mr Crowninshield at Salem, for an experiment, to obtain a translation of it, there, & at Boston, to be made under his auspices. It could not be translated at New York, or Phila., and I fear, that we shall have no better success, to the East. I have recd. no answer to the enquiry...
Finding by your letter recd yesterday that you would set out on that or this day, & probably be here to morrow, I resolved to await your arrival, & make a visit in the mean time to Loudoun, rather than take Loudoun in my route to Albemarle. I shall be back to morrow. 6. 24 pounders, 10. 18s. 10. 12s. 6. 6s. & 4. 8 Inch Howitzrs. are orderd to fort Pitt. They are necessary to batter & take...
It is with much diffidence I offer you a small token of regard for your great public worth and usefulness to our beloved country, and of my respect for you as a private Citizen. I have long had it in contemplation to present you with a saddle, and it being a thing of little value and I being no Foreigner, I earnestly hope you will have no objection in accepting it. I also hope you will not...
The Bank Subscription is filled. The deficit of the general returns, 3,000,000. Dollars, was taken by Mr. Girard, in a single line, to the great disappointment of the Brokers and Speculators. I congratulate you upon this event. There is little doubt of the organization of the Bank being republican, and friendly to the Government. The Cumberland road presents new embarrassments; and I Shall...
I arrived here late yesterday eving. having taken Richmond in my route. I had the great satisfaction to find Mrs. Monroe & our youngest daughter in better health than I had anticipated, as I had to find Mr Hay & our eldest. The early hour at which the post rider has called renders it impossible for me to say any thing on publick affrs. by this opportunity. I shall immediately turn my attention...
The incapacity for business produc’d by so long an application to it at Washington, has been increasd since my return home by a fall from my horse, being taken off by a limb of a tree under which he passed. My head, & left shoulder were bruis’d, & my leg cut a little by the stirrup, but I have almost recover’d from these injuries. I have walk’d about to day, & expect to be able to ride...
Immediately on hearing of the unpleasant inteligence that the City of Washington was in the possession of the enemy, a number of gentlemen on this & the Cincinnati side of the ohio, assembled & agreed, that in the events of the service of any Troops from this quarter being acceptable to you, exertions would be made to raise several Regts of mounted men and repair to the sceine of action...
§ From James Monroe. 21 February 1815, War Department. “I have the honor respectfully to propose for your approbation the enclosed appointments in the Army of the United States.” RC and enclosure ( DNA : RG 46, Executive Proceedings, Nominations, 13B–A3); letterbook copy and letterbook copy of enclosure ( DNA : RG 107, LSP ). RC 1 p.; in a clerk’s hand, signed by Monroe. Letterbook copy dated...
The Secretary of State, to whom has been referred the resolution of the Senate of the 28th of last month, requesting the President to cause to be laid before the Senate such information as he may possess touching the execution of so much of the first article of the late treaty of peace and amity between His Britannic Majesty and the United States of America as relates to the restitution of...
Your instructions relative to Fort Harrison, and the reservation of the land in its neighborhood, have been carried into effect. I hope now to be able to put the business of the Cumberland road, as well as the business of the Survey of the coasts, into a course of execution, without troubling you again. The consultation on the Resolution of Congress, respecting the currency, will be attended...
The inclosed application from Mr. Hughes, appears to be within the rules, exempting the effects of Public Ministers, upon their return to the United States, from the payment of duties. If you approve, the proper instructions will be given to the Collector. My solicitude, respecting the conduct of the State Banks, the organization of the National Bank, and the disorder of the currency,...
I have received yours of the 23. and shall proceed with the alteration of the Chimneys, as it will enable us to go on regularly with our work. Mrs Madison informs Me that She has not got the key of the upper front room, and thinks it was Carried to washington, if So you will Please to send it by next Mail. The key of the Closet leading to the garrett will not be neccessary as the Door will...
18 September 1811, Madeira. Encloses an invoice and bill of lading for the six pipes of wine JM ordered on 28 May—five pipes for JM and one for Mrs. Lucy Washington. Pipes no. 1 and 2 are from the vault of John de Carvalhal, the remainder from the private stock of Henry Correa. Assures JM of the purity of the wine, mentioning that “the vintages of the four last years have been remarkably bad &...
A nomination communicated yesterday to the Senate of Mr Jenkins made me sensible of a negligence of which I had been guilty to a very particular Friend of mine and the consequences of which I am anxious to repair. The gentleman to whom I allude is Colo Valentine Johnson who is anxious to procure the appointment to which Mr Jennings is nominated and who had requested me to make kno⟨w⟩n his...