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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
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When I saw Genl. Moses Green last he requested me to write you and inform you that if there was a vacancy of a regimental command in the Army it would give him great pleasure to fill it if he could be thought worthy of it. He would sooner have made known his wishes had he known that there certainly would have been war, but holding the office of adjutant-general in the State, which yeilds some...
The Subscribers Citizens of the United States residing in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts beg leave Most respectfully to represent That during the present War they have been captured on the high seas by the forces of the enemy while your petitioners were employed on services useful to their country either on board Merchantmen or private armed vessels of war and after being carried into...
On observing to several friends in Congress (who are in favour of a renewal of the Charter to the Bank U S & on the terms They have offerd to Congress as they are expressed in the report through a committee Published this day in the National intelligencer) That a much better plan could be carried into effect with or without the junction with the Old Bank , I was called on for a Sketch of a...
The last papers announce the nomination of Alexander Wolcott Esqre. as an associate Jud⟨ge o⟩f the Supreme Court of the United States, & that the nomination ⟨has⟩ been submitted by the Senate to a Committee for inquiry & consid⟨eratio⟩n. It is conceived, as this commitment was not of course, that ⟨it is?⟩ indicative of opposition & delay, if not of obloquy to be heaped on ⟨the?⟩ Candidate, &...
Be pleased to accept my cordial thanks for the inquiries you have made as to an engineer for this state. I am obliged to Mr. Latrobe for the information he has given it is very satisfactory and will be useful. Before I wrote to you I took the liberty to enclose to the Secretary of State a letter to Mr. Adams, and to request the Secretary to have inquiries made through our ministers, as to the...
While You are Honorably Engaged in patriotic Concerns for which my feelings Have not Ceased, during Six and thirty Years, to be truly American, I don’t Like to intrude on Your time With observations Relative to My private affairs. Yet the Correspondance is Now So Uncertain that I will not miss a Good opportunity to trouble you with a few Selfish Lines. I am much pleased to preface them with...
Whilst the revolution which has recently occurred in Europe astonishes and confounds by its unexpectedness and importance, its possible consequences to us are calculated to produce, a painful solicitude among all descriptions of our citizens, with those to whom a share of the public confidence is dispensed, that solicitude is necessarily increased. This will account for the trouble I give you...
I have just received your favor of the 15t. instant, and, conforming to it, I shall cease to act in the Treasury, after the dispatch of tomorrow’s mail. The kind expressions of your letter, make a deep and lasting impression. I shall resort to the testimonials of your approbation and confidence, for consolation, whenever the past reminds me of any Sacrafice to be lamented; or the future shall...
Tho late, I congratulate you on the revocation of the French decrees, & Congress still more; for without something new from the belligerents, I know not what ground they could have taken for their next move. Britain will revoke her orders of council, but continue their effect by new paper blockades, doing in detail what the orders did in the lump. The exclusive right to the sea by conquest is...
I have this moment received your’s of 3d. instt., an answer to which has been anticipated by my two last letters. I am urging the Captain of the Peacock, and still hope that he will be ready to sail the day after to morrow. I almost envy you the happy time which you will spend this summer in Orange, and which will not, I hope, be disturbed by any untoward change in our affairs. I think that,...