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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Madison, Dolley Payne Todd" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
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The enclosed letters particularly the one for Mr. Dublois are upon business the most urgent please forward them as soon as convenient. I have recd. one short letter from you since we parted, not one from Lucy. Never was a poor sinner so much exhausted with an election campaign as I am; what with riding & talking I am quite sick; the second monday in March I was at M⟨or⟩gantown from thence to...
20 March 1809, Philadelphia. Encloses samples of “two kinds of lace” for use in the chariot ordered by JM. The coach will be finished by 15 May, “the Chariot about a fortnight later.” Has examined a “very handsome” English chariot made in London last July which has influenced his thinking. Mrs. Latrobe [a friend of Dolley Madison’s since childhood] is suffering from an eye inflammation, but...
Farewell my dear Sister & say good bye for me to my beloved friend Madison. He carries with him into the Presidency the most affectionate good wishes of my heart: produced by an intimate acquaintance with his public & private virtues for nine years past; & I can say with great truth that not one single act of his life during the period I speak of has excited a momentary doubt as to its...
24 June 1813. Writes “in sincere anxiety for the health of the President,” and asks for “at least a line to say whether the reports of his illness are not exaggerated.” Adds at the request of her father [Anthony Morris] that he has decided “to leave us all here except Brother that he may be at more liberty to avail himself of the first opportunity which shall present itself from any port.” RC...
Your Letter of October 12th was an unexpected pleasure, and I cannot regret the occasion which gave rise to it, altho there appears now to have been some mistake respecting it. I have heard my Friend frequently mention the circumstance, communicated to him by mr Stodart, tho not untill it was out of his power to comply with it, and with Sincere Regret that it was so. for beside the high...
I am again at Clarksburg after an absence of two months, worse than mispent in the western Country. I have not even the consolation to believe that any benefit has resulted to the community from my expedition, & therefore there is no offset for ⟨m⟩y in⟨di⟩vidual sacrifices of time & money. I left General Harrison at Franklinton about the 1st. instant & the Virginia troops at Delaware four or...
I am here & expected to have been tomorrow in Washington. It is however necessary, I find that I should see Mr Finlay, who is making the Chairs & Sofas for your Drawing room in his Shop, & therefore I shall stay tomorrow & arrive in the city on Tuesday. Your Chariot is in great forwardness, & will be one of the handsomest things Philadelphia has produced. The Coachee has its last Coat of paint...
My Grandson William Stuben Smith, having returnd from abroad, declines the honour which I have been informd, was intended him by the President, as secretary of Legation, to the Mission to England. His Brother, John Adams Smith, has written to me; to request of the President, the appointment, if he Should deem it proper to grant it to him. As Congress do not allow a private Secretary to their...
5 October 1812. Sends this letter by his cousin Edward Carrington, son of Judge Paul Carrington. “You will find Mr. Carrington an amiable and intelligent young gentleman; full of indignation at the wrongs and insults under which his Country suffers, and animated with an ardent zeal to avenge them by his personal efforts in the field; he attempted to raise a Volunteer Company, but having failed...
Your very obliging & kind letter was received by Mrs. Latrobe yesterday, & I had also your commands on business which I beg leave to answer concisely today & to write more at large tomorrow. Your directions as to the liveries shall be obeyed. The patterns of colors on Glass met with an accident. They were broken & shall be sent on, repainted , tomorrow. The sketch of the Chariot in my letter...