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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Gallatin, Albert" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
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15 October 1812, Nantucket. Requests that his salary be raised to place him “on A footing with other keepers of light housses” and that a dwelling be built for him near the lighthouse. RC ( DNA : RG 217, Manning File). 1 p. On the verso is a note of the same date from four selectmen of Nantucket attesting to the correctness of Coffin’s letter. On the cover sheet Gallatin redirected Coffin’s...
29 October 1812. In accordance with an act of 3 Mar. 1809, directs “the sum of Five hundred thousand Dollars, of the fund appropriated for the pay of the Army, be applied to that of the Clothing Department.” RC (owned by Albert C. Wilkerson, Richmond, Va., 1961). 1 p.; in a clerk’s hand, signed by JM. See U.S. Statutes at Large The Public Statutes at Large of the United States of America … (17...
31 October 1812. In accordance with a 3 Mar. 1809 act of Congress, directs “that the sum of fifty thousand dollars be applied out of the appropriation of Sulphur & Salt Petre to Provisions & twenty five thousand dollars out of the same appropriation to Contingent expenses.” Letterbook copy ( DNA : RG 45, Letters to Federal Executive Agents, 1798–1824). 1 p. See U.S. Statutes at Large The...
A mr James Dinsmore of my neighborhood, a very honest & worthy man himself, is anxious that I should write to you on behalf of a brother of his who lives in the Missipi territory , and who wishes for the place of Reciever of the public monies in that territory now vacant. of the brother I know nothing personally. the one here gives me the strongest assurances of his worth, & if he is like...
Mr. Parrishes Reply to the proposition to A purchas in the Loan was only yesterday Reced and I am Sorry to Say that tho he Says he Should Leik to be engagd yet he must Decline b[e]cause he See no provability of a Speedy arrangement for Peace and he is of opinion that not more than 2 or 3 Millions could be raisd in Philadelphia and that at not Less than 7 pct. In consequence of his Declining...
For perusal & to be returned. Why not prohibit altogether fine Cottons & Woolens, which we do not want—& which in fact are not imported from any Country other than G.B. unless bought there from G.B. Such a total prohibition of these & some other Articles perhaps, wd. render a partial repeal of the Non Impn. Act, more operative, than the act at present is, or will be, under the new arts for...
What are the provisions , & for what purpose ? Is it strictly regular for the Govt. to have any positive relation to a trade, in its own Vessels contrary to the Law of N? Govts. are not bound to prevent . Still a passport to protect agst. American cruisers, seems to be the minimum of interposition. The Scy. of State will decide the case; in consequence of an interview with Mr. Dashkoff. The...
It is determined finally to associate Mr. Bayard in the Mission Extraordinary to St. Petersburg. The Secretary of State informs him of it by this mail. It cannot fail to be useful, if you can see him on your way thro’ Wilmington, ascertain his sentiments on the occasion, and hasten his preparations if he should be willing to undertake the service. We hope the vessel will sail in 14 days at...
I do myself the Honour to enclose a few Letters from my Family here to that part of Us who are at St. Petersburg; and ask the favour of Your Care of them. It will be great Joy to your Colleague in that City to receive the Society of Gentlemen he has So long known, and whose great Experience in public Affairs will furnish him with every necessary Information. I can do no more than pray for your...
I have recd. yours of the 22d. from Baltimore. I find that the dispatches of Mr. Dashkoff will not leave Washington till Tuesday. Mr. Monroe avails himself of this to prepare his the more leisurely. Payne will be the Bearer of them. He could have set off tomorrow morning, if necessary: but will be the better for the delay; his boil not being healed, though relieved by the salutary maturation &...
I inclose a draft for $800 dollars to be a fund in your hands for J. P. Todd. He has in his own $200 more; which our estimate called for. Should the whole be judged, on a better calculation, to be deficient, be so good as to convert a draft on me into a supply of the deficiency. He sets out tomorrow morning and will be in Philada. the day after this reaches you. A blank Commission has been...
I have a Grand Son the oldest Child of J Q Adams whom we are desirous of sending to Petersburg to his father according to his fathers repeated request to us. He is 12 years old and an ingenuous youth. We are anxious to know whether you Gentlemen will condescend to take him under your protection; and whether it will be possible to send him to you before your ship will sail. His father will pay...
You will learn from the Secy of State the painful manner in which the Senate have mutilated the Mission to St Petersburg: But the course and circumstances of the proceeding may require more of explanation than may fall within his scope and more indeed than can well be conveyed on Paper. Previous to sending in the nomination of the Envoys there was no indication, that if the popularity of the...
This letter will be presented to you by mr George Ticknor , a young gentleman of Boston . he favored me with a visit here and brought high recommendations from mr Adams and others , and during a stay of several days with us, I found he merited every thing which had been said of him. he has been excellently educated, is learned, industrious eager after knolege, and as far as his stay with us...
An American going to Paris considers you of course as his natural patron there; but still it is well you should know when worth presents itself, and is added to the claim of a fellow citizen on your good offices. the bearer mr William B. Buchanan is the son of James A. Buchanan esquire of Baltimore of great worth and respectab il ity. he embarks for Europe with Doct r Eustis , and will...
This letter will be handed you by mrs Patterson , daughter of mr Patterson of Baltimore , with whose high standing worth and patriotism you are well acquainted, and probably with his person. mrs Patterson , as a citizen of the United States, would naturally recieve your patronage and attentions, while at Paris ; which with your knolege of her family would render unnecessary any recommendations...
M r Girardin , who will have the honor of presenting you this letter, revisits his native country after a residence of 20. years in this his country by adoption. he will consider this relation as placing him under your protection, of which he is entirely worthy. a residence of some years in my neighborhood enables me to assure you that he is a gentleman of science, of worth, and perfect...
I have just recd. your favor of the 4th. I congratulate yourself and Mrs. Gallatin on your safe arrival, and under circumstances which must console her so much for your prolonged absence. I was not unprepared for a heavy demand for expenses of J. P. Todd. I thank you for your kindness in lending your responsibility; and being unable in my present situation to do better for repaying the...
In my hurry yesterday to be ready for a waiting mail, I overlooked your question when I should return to Washington? I have not fixed on the precise time, but it will probably be not sooner nor more than a few days later than the 1st. of October. If you have a trip there in view why not extend it, bringing Mrs Gallatin with you, to Virginia? Cordial regards RC ( NHi : Gallatin Papers).
A long absence from home must apologize for my so late acknolegement of your welcome favor of Sep. 6. our storm of the 4 th of that month gave me great uneasiness for you; for I was certain you must be on the coast, and your actual arrival was unknown to me. it was such a wind as I have not witnessed since the year 1769 . it did however little damage with us, only prostrating our corn, and...
M r Dabney Terril , a relation of mine (the grandson of my sister) wishing to finish his education in Europe , I have advised him to go to Geneva preferably to any other place. his foundation is a moderate progress in Latin French and Mathematics. he is 17. years of age, perfectly correct in his morals and deportment, amiable in his dispositions, and thirsty after knolege. his circumstances...
Your last favor is recieved just as I am setting out for a possession 90. miles Southwardly, from whence I shall not return until the first week of the ensuing month. I hasten therefore to drop you a line of Adieu. I sincerely rejoice that you are going to France . I do not think with you that nothing can be done there. Louis XVIII is a fool, & a bigot, but bating a little duplicity he is...
Mr. Dallas has signified to me that it being his intention not to pass another Winter in Washington, he has thought it his duty to give me an opportunity of selecting a Successor during the present session of Congress; intimating a willingness, however, to remain, if desired, in order to put the national Bank in motion. Will it be most agreeable to you, to proceed on your mission to France; or...
I have not yet made the remittance to Mr. Baring, and cannot do it at the present moment without an increased sacrifice. I would prefer making it however notwithstanding the hope of a Change for the better ere long, to giving Mr. B any ground for complaint. Be so good as to say whether you consider the delay as in the least dissatisfactory or disadvantageous to him, and I will take my measures...
I have just recieved a request from M. de la Fayette to send him two copies of the Review of Montesquieu , published in Philadelphia about 4. or 5. years ago, and have written to Dufief to forward them under cover to you, wherever you may be, which he will know better than I can. I pray you to be the bearer of them, with the letter for him now inclosed; and, if you have never read the work,...
I have written you several letters all of which, except one committed to your attention, letters for others. The one excepted requested an answer, and as it has not yet come to hand, and I learn that a late mail was wrecked on its passage, I am apprehensive my letter may have been in it. On the eve of my Departure therefore I repeat its contents. It remarked that I had not yet made the...
The jealousy of the European governments rendering it unsafe to pass letters thro’ their post-offices, I am obliged to borrow the protection of your cover to procure a safe passage for the inclosed letter to M de de Staël , and to ask the favor of you to have it delivered at the hotel of M. De Lessert without passing thro’ the post office. In your answer of June 7. to mine of May 18 . you...
Will you have the goodness my dear Sir to send the enclosed to Mrs. C King, as I do not know her address. I take the liberty of making this request having witnessed your readiness to serve the Ladies, and feeling and how happy they are to receive an obligation at your hands— Present my respectful Compliments to Mrs. Gallatin and believe me, Sir, with the highest sentiment of esteem and...
I write you a few lines to apologise for the liberty I took in requesting you would affix you Seal to what I supposed would have been a small paper parcell containing some very trifling articles for which Mr. Adams had permitted me to send, and which I thought too trifling to request an order for as it is always obtained with difficulty—I flatter myself you will pardon the error and believe me...