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I find by a letter from Mr. Dallas that he was to leave Washington on Tuesday last for Philadelphia. He kindly intends, however, to give official attention to the routine of business until apprised of his release. The date for this I wish to be governed by your conveniency. I have informed Mr. Lowndes of the approaching vacancy in the Department of War, and asked his permission to appoint him...
You will receive herewith the Commission which conveys your appointment as Secretary for the Department of war. It will afford me great pleasure if it should be consistent with your present views to accept it. The delay in communicating with you on the subject has proceeded from the calculation that you would have left Europe before a dispatch could reach it. I leave this one in the hands of...
I return the letter from Mr. Hall inclosed in yours of the 19th. The fullest confidence is due to the truth of his statement, and to the purity of his views. But it seems impossible to yield the sanction he suggests, to the wishes of his neighbours respectable as they may be. The difference between a forbearance to enforce a law, on considerations forbidding the attempt, and a notice that...
I have just recd. from Mr. Monroe a very extraordinary communication confidentially made to him by Col: Jessup. A copy of it is inclosed. An invasion by a Spanish force at the present period might be pronounced a mere chimaera, if a less degree of folly reigned at Madrid; unless indeed the Councils of Spain shd. be supported by a power whose councils may reasonably be more confided in. It is...
The letter & papers returned Feby 4 with the following note. The arrangement communicated by the Presidt. of the U.S. Bank is so important an advance towards a universal return of specie circulation, that the Treasury sanction to it under existing circumstances evidently proper. Serious difficulties will notwithstanding remain to be encountered, if the principal Banks in every State do not...
I return, with my approbation, the additional regulations for Mr. Lee, enclosed in yours of the 20th. inst. If you have been correctly informed of the evidence on the claim of Mr. Carroll, it is truly extraordinary. Whether a House was a military deposit or not must depend on its being or not being occupied as such under the defined authority, and on the exhibition or the want of adequate...
Mr. Crawford will be so good as to put convenient dates into the Blanks. If there be any thing in the Proclamation which can be made better, he will retain it, till an interview be had. See the *Proclamation in the Mississippi Territory now sent & Govr. Williams’ complaint of neglect in removing Squatters within S. C--orders to thro’ the Military Commanders of Divisions, will be necessary to...
I have to thank you for your letter of June 16. it presents those special views of the state of things in Europe , for which we look in vain into newspapers. they tell us only of the downfall of Bonaparte , but nothing of the temper, the views, and secret workings of the high agents in these transactions. altho’ we neither expected, nor wished any act of friendship from Bonaparte , and always...
This will be handed you by my friend D r Barton , one of the Vice-presidents of the American Philosophical society , a professor in the University of Philadelphia and distinguished by his writings in the Physical sciences. he proposes for the benefit of his health to take a voyage across the Atlantic and to try the air of Europe for a while—if not personally known to you, I am sure he is...
I am about to sin against all discretion, and knowingly, by adding to the drudgery of your letter-reading, this acknolegement of the reciept of your favor of May 31. with the papers it covered. I cannot however deny my self the gratification of expressing the satisfaction I have recieved, not only from the general statement of affairs at Paris , in your’s of Dec. 12. 14. (as a matter of...
I return the letter of Genl: Gaines with the papers connected with it. It is to be hoped & much to be wished that a resort to the extreme measures contemplated may not be necessary; and it may be better that they shd. result from military discretion guided by imperious emergencies, than be prescribed by the Executive, without the sanction of the authority more competent to such decisions. In...
The proposed order for the 1st. of Augst. is approved. It being desireable that the testimony called for by Gen. Gaines, be procured in all the extent practicable, It may be proper to apprize Gen: Smith of the destination of Genl: Ripley, and to order his attendance with that of Capt: Ship if the service in that quarter will permit. PHi : Daniel Parker Papers.
On my return after a long absence I learned that you had been so kind as to send the Collector’s commission to mr Minor , and that he had declined it. it seems he had in the mean time engaged in a business from which he could not withdraw, a circumstance unknown to me when I troubled you on the subject. my thankfulness to you however is not the less. I mentioned at the same time mr Southall ’s...
You will percieve that the inclosed papers of Jacob Koontz , are from a very ignorant man, who supposes I am still at Washington , and the proper person to be addressed. under this supposition he has even forwarded his original papers on which his all depends. in rigor I ought to return them to him, but on so distant a transmission by mail they would run risks, and I would rather at once place...
I have recd. yours of the 20th. inst. The claim of W. Knaggs involves an important question; what is the effect produced on the Salaries of persons made prisoners by an Enemy, by and during their captivity? Civil officers are of two classes. 1st. Those holding during good behaviour 2dly. Those holding during pleasure. Whilst the offices of the 1st. class continue and the officers are not...
I return the draught of instructions to the Commissioners for treating with the Chicasaw Indians. Not being aided by a map, I am not sure that I understand distinctly all your demarkations. I take for granted they are correct, unless it be otherwise in the reference to the portion of the Chicasaw lands lying within the State of Tennessee. You will be able to decide on re-examining that part of...
The limited prosecution of the plan of Lt. Gadsden, which you suggest may be proper. A general system of works on which the permanent security of N.O. is to depend, and which will probably call for a million of dollars, ought not to be hastily adopted at a moment as little threatening as the present. The observations of the young Engineer indicate good sense; but it may well be supposed that...
I rebut as steadily as is in my power applications to join in sollicitations for appointment. but circumstances sometimes render it impossible. a mr Armistead of this state who married a neice of our governor, has a family, and is reduced to extreme want by unsuccesful commerce wishes to be appointed a clerk in some of the offices at Washington . he is represented as a very worthy man, and...
I recieve here, where I pass much of my time, your favor of Oct. 28. and thank you for it’s kindness. the object of my adding this to the mass of your labors in letter-reading, is lest I should have been misunderstood in my application on behalf of mr Minor I proposed him as successor to Tho s J. Randolph , our collector who has resigned, or will immediately, and not as successor to mr...
I take the liberty of quoting to you the passage of a letter I have recieved from a mr John Bradbury of New York , as follows. ‘I notice in the reports of the proceedings of Congress that a road is in contemplation from S t Louis to the Northern boundary of Louisiana ; for the laying out of which Comm rs are to be appointed. I am well acquainted with a considerable portion of the country from...
The high standing of Genl. Gaines strengthens his title to all the testimony he calls for, as far as it be attainable. Measures may be taken by the War Dept. for the attendance of the Witnesses named, subject to the conditions of practicability in point of time & distance, and to the demands of the public service in the judgment of military commanders. The probable duration of the Court...