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When I take a retrospective view of the innumerable obligations which I owe you, not only as the revered Parents of my husband but as the kindest and best of friends, my heart expands with filial gratitude yet I know not how to attempt an expression of my feelings. After a residence of five years under your roof which has been endeared to me by some of the most interesting events of my life,...
How was I delighted in Seing your handwriting on the Addres—I could not guess—it was a Letter—I did not expect one—although I was confident, that, if the State of your health had been worse, Cornelia Amelia would have deemed it her duty to Send me a line—You can guess—how I was delighted—when opening it—I Saw it was a Letter from my revered frend—I glanced over it, without looking at the...
Your Mama, and I, consent that you shall ask Doctor Nicholes’s permission to come home for the Holidays, on Tuesday; upon Condition that you will return to School after the Holidays, as cheerfully, as you now come from it. Your affectionate Father. MHi : Adams Papers.
It is related of Augustus Caesar, that being upon his death-bed, he turned just before he expired to the friends who were standing around, and asked them what they thought of the part which he had acted on the scene of human life—They express’d their admiration as their feelings or their prudence inspired—Then said he “Plaudite”. In the article of Death, Augustus was what he had been...
Hence forward I Shall adress you all three at once. Yesterday was one of the happiest days of my Life. It brought me News of your Father and Mother at Paris and your Uncle Aunt and Cousin at New York all in good health. My Boys! I want to Say Something to you on the Subject of Languages. I have no great Opinion of those who boast of possessing a great number of them. If you know Greek and...
I have received Letters from you all, and you know not how gratifying they have been to my heart. With pleasure I See the great Advantage you have already derived from the Advice of your Father. I have recd. four Letters from George N. 1. 2. 4 and 5. Number Three only is missing. George writes like the elder Brother he is. John writes with that Vivacity and Spirit which always delighted Us;...
I have now gone through Terence, and noted a few Lines for you to consider. Many perhaps have escaped my Notice that deserved it MHi : Adams Papers.
I received this day a Letter from your father dated 21 Sep’br. it was a Letter different from any which I have before received from him.—it communicated to me, and to you the sorrowfull intelligence of the Death of your dear and only Sister. She was taken Sick in August, and died the 15th of Seb’br with a nervous fever which brought on convulsions your parents are in great affliction as you...
It is better to go to the House of mourning than to the House of Feasting, or dancing, for the living lay it to heart. you my dear Children are now calld to the House of mourning and Sorrow, by the death of your dear Aunt Smith and the only daughter of your Grandparents, the only Sister of your Father. your Aunt died last night, to the deep affliction of the whole Family—her pure Spirit I...
I know not where your Father is, or I should write directly to him. As Soon as you See him, pray to procure for himself and for you “Il Consulato del Mare” with all the Tanslations of it, into Dutch, German, Italian, French, English Spanish, and as many as there be. I have it only with a translation into Low Dutch. About 8 or 9 hundred Years ago, (I have neither time nor patience to look up...
I write to you both together, to assure you that although far distant from you, I always bear you both in my thoughts with tender affection—I hope that when you receive this letter, you will both be able to read, and understand it, and that you, George, will also be able to write me an answer to it—The greatest pleasure that you can give to you Parents, is to pursue your Studies with...
I adress myself to both of you as equally dear to me and because the difficulty with which I write, will not allow me to write seperately to each. Our anxiety for you and for your Father Mother, Brother, Uncle Aunt and little first and Second Cousin: have been greater than you can conceive. Some relief however We have received from Vessels you met at Sea, one of which brought a Letter from Mr...
I know not where your Father is, or I Should write directly to him. As Soon as you See him, pray him to procure for himself and for you “Il Consulato del Mare” with all the Tanslations of it, into Dutch, German, Italien, French, English Spanish, and as many as there be. I have it only with a translation into Low Dutch. About 8 or 9 hundred Years ago, (I have neither time nor patience to look...
I have not had the pleasure of hearing from you since I wrote you last; but having an opportunity, which now seldom happens, of sending letters to America, I will not let it pass, without writing you to inform you that your Mamma, and brother Charles, with myself are in as good health as the excessive cold weather of this Country and Season will admit—But I shall not have time at present to...
I have for many Months made it a rule, to enclose to you a Newspaper, every week, and I have intended that it never should be without at least one Letter, from myself or some one of the family, to you or my Mother—I believe this intention has never entirely failed; but it has not always been possible for me to write, myself—The reasons of this are so well known to you, that I hope they will...
I am favoured with yours of the 7th. inst. After telling me that the employment of your thoughts upon your public essays precludes your attention, for the present, to my letters, I should be bereft of apology for filling again a whole sheet, if you had not also said that you are in no apprehension of being inundated. Amidst the heaviest outpouring which may be supposed to be congregating in...
I regret, that So often I must wearÿ you with mÿ complaints about myself, and yet I must do it, in apologÿ to myself, when I write a dull Letter. I have again be tortured with head-ache, and enjoÿ now only a little relief, which I am apprehensive Shall not last long—but I must take hold of this interval, to give me the pleasure, of answering your last favour of the 2d inst. I believe, I Shall...
I have given the above extract exactly as I find it in a book of my venerated parent that I have just been reading, and which is full of interesting anecdote. I avow it in part as my motive, that I may ask you what toast you would give now if I had the happiness of being in your company at Quincy. That we shall have to fight longer is, as I intimated to you a few days ago, highly probable. The...
“Arma, Cestusque”, parmamque “repono,” upon the offensive subject of one of my late letters to you.— I sincerely rejoice in the successful issue of the operation upon Mrs Smith’s breast. I would reciprocate your expressions of pleasure upon the appearances of a recussitation of the Spirit of 177 4 at Washington did I believe they would terminate in any thing but in upon Speeches, Embassies...
In further answer to your favor of the 20th of last month, I beg leave to say, that I have just returned from the visit I talked of making to Philadelphia. I find it to be as decidedly the opinion of my mother and brothers, as I confess it was my own, that my fathers letters should not be given up for the press. If, therefore, you should write to Doctor Mease, may we venture to ask it of your...
An offective son, & one of the children of the church presumes to address you an epistle. I long admired your measures in preparing to expend this nation in time of peace, & thus prevent war from spreding ruin over the land. Now all the nation is convinced of the propriety of your measures respecting the navy & impropriety of the measures of your successors. Our navy has done wonders. God...
More trouble hangs over the Camp The President last night, indulged The Secretary of War, by consenting to the arrest of Major General Wilkinson—The Court martial is detailed, and dispatches with an official arrest were this morning, sent off from the War office, to the Army of the North—somebody must be sacrificed to cover the blunders of the War— Yours respectfully, MHi : Adams Papers.
He published—his opinions on Jus Eccles. Protest . in the Ses—which were—under his presidium—defended publicly by his most eminent Students. This could not be performed without awakening the intolerant zeal of the clergy—Their rage—increased when manÿ of their Brethren Strengthened him with their open Support—then the Church became in danger. Spies—under pious pretexts were Send to him for...
Your favour of the 27th. ult. arrived when I was at Worcester attending a session of the Supreme Court to get some redress for a most gross and injurious Fraud. Immediately on my return, I set out for Boston, from whence I returned last evening. These jaunts have occasioned this delay in the acknowledgment of your Letter. “Poor Democrats, Republicans, and still poorer Americans, are,” you say,...
So much time has elapsed since the date of my letter in February, that I have dismissed all expectations of an answer. Of the destruction of Babylon, and the birth of Cyrus, considering how much the evidence of a system of Religion is depending on that event and on that character, I may have spoken more at random than a due regard to prevailing sentiments will allow. The whoredoms of Babylon...
I can now answer the questions in your favor of the 30th. July last, viz. Who shall write the history of the American Revolution &c.? Major General James Wilkinson has written it. He commences with the battle of Bunker’s or Breed’s hill at Boston and concludes with the battle near New-Orleans on the Missisippi, a period of forty years. It will be published in three volumes large octavo, each...
I recieved your letter my dear Child only a few days since and am charmed to find that George and you are such good boys I am sure you are much obliged to Cousin Abby for your letters. and I you will soon learn to write them yourself I hope as they will afford me double pleasure George is now near ten years old and is I am sure too much of a man to play truant any more and I am sure you never...
Your letter, dear Sir, of May 6. had already well explained the Uses of grief, that of Sep. 3. with equal truth adduces instances of it’s abuse; and when we put into the same scale these abuses, with the afflictions of soul which even the Uses of grief cost us, we may consider it’s value in the economy of the human being, as equivocal at least. those afflictions cloud too great a portion of...
During some time past my time has been devoted to writing the History of Mr. Jefferson’s administration with an historical sketch of the affairs of the Union from the period of the adoption of the Federal Constitution: as the sale of the work in Massachusetts will be considerably enhanced by the Sanction of your name—I have intruded upon your politeness to ask permission to place it at the...
I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your respected, and highly interesting letter of the 6th. & 9th. of the present month with their enclosures, the latter of which I now return.— While obliged by their communication I feel reluctant at trespassing so largely upon your time & retrospections, and beg leave again to reiterate the request, that you would not call them into exercise for...
Owing to an unusual press of matter for the two last papers we have been compelled to postpone the publication of the Correspondence. In the mean time we have unfortunately mislaid part of a page of manuscript. We have enclosed the last paragraph of that published, together with the first Succeeding sheet & desire you to take the pains to supply the deficiency. This frank avowal of our...
It is with great pleasure that I have observed, of late, the continued evidences of thy health so prolonged, and habitual activity and attention. Long may it be continued. I have lately been favored with a Letter from thy Son, at London, whom so many are anxious to see return to the United States. The American Academy of Arts and Sciences, has conferred on me the honor of a Fellowship, with...
Since I had the pleasure of writing you yesterday, I have learnt that a Swedish vessel will sail from here on Sunday or Monday next direct for Gottenburg, and that Capt Wm Story, a Brother of Judge Story, is to take passage in her—Perhaps a better opportunity to write your Son our Minister in Russia will not occur this summer— Capt Story is an intimate acquaintance of mine, and I am persuaded...
I take the liberty of sending you a republication in the pamphlet form, of a series of papers essays that were published in one of the papers in this town during the Session of the legislature. They were prompted by a sincere conviction that the tranquillity and Union of the Country were really in danger and that every good citizen was bound to make such efforts as lay in his power, however...
I received some five weeks ago, an order from the President of the United States, an order to repair immediately to Gothenburg, in Sweden, upon an errand, the object of which being public, is well–known to you—It reached me just at a time when the Passage between Russia and Sweden was impracticable, or becoming so before it was possible for me to carry it into Execution. To avoid as much as...
When I wrote to you on the 9th. inst. I did not expect that I should again trouble you; nor did I look for an answer, except to the postscript, nor to that unless you chose to continue the communications you have made me embargoed in my bosom. To this hour, I can very truly assure you, that the contents of your Letters are unknown to any human being but myself, excepting those to whom they...
I find upon my table this morning your favour of the 7. March; and I know not whether I have ever answered it. I approve of your “eating and Sleeping and living together; of your playing Football, Crickett; running, climbinge, leaping Swimming, Skateing; and have no great Objection to your play at Marbles. These are good for your Health: but what do you do for your Mind? The Mind is of more...
Tu m’aduli, ma tu mi piace says anÿ where Chesterfield—but so you do in a most egregious manner—but you make your Physic so highly palatable, that it is swallowed, before reason can with sufficient coolness examine, if the encomium—so kindly bestowed is really deserved. You want not to be informed—that I am highlÿ pleased, when I am favoured with your encouraging approbation—and whÿ should I...
I have now before me your favour of July the 15th, with which, as usual, I was highlÿ gratified. I could have wished, to have delay’d its answer longer, till the assaults of that relentless Demon of head-ache had been abated, who possesses me again Since three weeks, but I know not, to what charm he will listen—So that I must Submit with resignation, till he is tired of the contest. Indeed...
I have the very great pleasure to acknowledge your favour of the 15th. Inst. Be assured, Sir, that I appreciate the honour of your correspondence; and that it will be a precious reward to cultivate and deserve your esteem and confidence. “The uncertainty of politics” is, indeed, as obvious, as it is lamentable. I cannot, however, unite with you, in applying to it the epithet “glorious.” It is...
I had the honor to receive your Favour of the 15th of December, for which I beg leave to express my grateful acknowledgements. I never read any thing from your pen, without deriving information and pleasure. You have Sir, I believe drawn a correct map of Bonaparte’s power. I had some similar ideas, but you have measured things by a large scale, and marked the limits of nature. Napoleon, like...
You had done me the honour of answering my letters to you, so fully, that I had supposed I should never again, perhaps, trespass on your time and attention. I am induced, however, once more, to trouble you. I this day received an anonymous letter, under no date, and bearing the Boston Post office mark. It is very well written, and appears disinterested. It is respectful, liberal, and evinces a...
If I have not addressed you before it was not that gratitude did not prompt an expression of the feelings your early patronage & continued kindness had excited— You are pleased to enquire the name and age of our Child—We have given him his Grandfathers name of William—he is 2½ Years and rather (if a Mother may be credited) promissing than otherwise— I am proud my dear Sir to find that the...
The last mail brought me your favour of the 8th of July, with a postscript of the 13th. inst. Whether you had received my letter of the 9th. inst. does not appear by you favour. You request the return of the Letter to yourself uncopied—you will find it enclosed, but if you have no particular reasons to the contrary, you would oblige me by entrusting it to my possession. It contains many things...
Will thy good-nature excuse the freedom of a friendly enquiry after thy health? assured that a real solicitude exists for its long continuance, with every other blessing? And of our Minister, thy Son—hast thou heard of late from him? I am anxious to learn how my humble offering was received, as well by him, as by the Autocrat of all Russia. And I am also very anxious to learn that the labors...
I enclose you four numbers of Duane’s paper. They contain a good deal of matter relative to the dispute between our Country & great Britain. I have not read a column of it, but it excites general attention in our city, and of course is probably worth the notice of a Man who has not, like myself, outlived his patriotism. My wife, Uncle Mr Boudinot and his daughter it is said, have lately paid a...
I do myself the honor to address you on a point of the treaty of Peace of 1783, become important in a case of ejectment pending in this State, for property which I purchased in the Island of Barbados in the year 1807, not doubting immediate possession on a title perfectly clear. The 6th. Act provides that “no more confiscations shall be made” The estate in controversy, was then, in 1783, the...
An absence of 5. or 6. weeks, on a journey I take three or four times a year, must apologize for my late acknolegement of your favor of Oct. 12. after getting thro the mass of business which generally accumulates during my absence, my first attention has been bestowed on the subject of your letter. I turned to the passages you refer to the subject of your letter. I turned to the passages you...
R. Rush presents his affectionate respects to Mr Adams, with the hope that Mrs Adams and himself are both well. He begs the favor of Mr Adams to present to Mrs A. the enclosed letter. On his return to this shabby village the day before yesterday after a month’s absence on a visit to beautiful Philadelphia, R. R. had the pleasure to find Mr Adams’s favor of the 26th of April, sealed with a...
Enclosed in a communication for the Palladium. I shall delay forwarding it to the Printers for a few days, that if it contains anything unwarranted by your Letters to and Conversations with me, you may point out wherein. I have been cruelly and unjustly treated by you. I have, nevertheless, in all that I have done, been Sparing—Review your Letter to me of the 16th. of Jan. 1810, in connection...