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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John Quincy" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
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I must abide by the rule I have establishd, which is not to let any opportunity of writing to you, pass unimproved.—altho I have no later letters from you, to acknowledge than, that, from Paris of the 19th March. Since the receit of which, I believe I have written you half a dozen. I have little more to say now, than that we are all well, anxiously longing for Letters from you, and for...
I had left off writing entirely from the idea that you would have left England Ghent befor a Letter of mine could reach but from all the accounts which we here recieve I find that it is possible you may remain at Ghent half the Winter therefore I have resolved to write again and trust to chance for the return of my Letters in case you should be on your way— I have moved into Town and made...
I was very happy to recieve your Letter of the 12 August, which I have been waiting for with much impatience. I am sorry my writing was not good, but I hope in time I shall learn to write, with as much ease and elegance as Brother George; I will take more pains for the future. You ask me what I mean by a colour? it is a small piece of red paint used in painting Pictures. The rose-bud which you...
“Oh that I too, could make a visit to my Father,” was your exclamation in your last Letter. more than a visit You may make, my dear Son, If the Newspapers may be credited, for they announce from South to North, that you are to be recall’d and to fill the department of State. this is repeated over and again, & appears to give universal satisfaction. this I learn from all quarters—I rejoice in...
Your kind letter arrived just in time to cheer us. Charles and I were both quite sick, but are now thank God much better, though Dr. Galloway has order’d me to keep him at home for some days, the weather being uncommonly cold, and the Bridge not likely to be put up for some days. We have nothing new. there is some talk of the Emperor’s return, some say immediately, others not untill August....
Altho I sent Letters yesterday to go by our Ministers from N York, yet a new opportunity offering I readily embrace it. mr Tuckerman has kindly sent us word that he is permitted to go in a vessel from Norfolk to Gottenburgh, and will take any Letters we may have, as his Brother the Rev’d mr Tuckerman came in his behalf, and will wait untill I write you a few lines my Letter must be short. I...
I had the honor to write you, on the 18th: Nov. 1811, since which I have been deprived of the pleasure of any of your always highly esteemed favors. I heard with the most sincere sorrow, it had been the Divine Dispensation, to afflict you & your dear Lady with the loss of your little Daughter, I wish it was in my power to offer any Consolation on an occasion so trying & distressing; but alass...
No 39 arrived in due time and I have for some time been perpetually satisfied with the Post Office I hope however that we shall not long stand in need of their civilities as I am rather impatient to have you home the rappid approach of winter encreases my impatience and as the event of this negociation appears to be still unfavorable I cannot help feeling fretful and half angry at the delay...
I was much disappointed at the receipt of your last letter having flatter’d myself that you would have had some letters from our friends both in Boston and Washington The Conservateur of to day announces that you have at last recieved the answer to your last Note and that it is of so favorable a nature that peace will be the consequence of the truth of this I can form no opinion but the report...
This Letter will derive some merit from its being the latest date, and I hope will reach you soon. it comes to inform you that mr Tarbel has Letters for you—your Father has given you his opinion respecting the publication of the extract of his Letter to dr price by mr Morgan. I send you the copy from the original and am ready to ask mr Morgan, in the words of the play. “who was the dupe? with...
I am charmed to find by your last letter that you pass your time so agreeably at Ghent: it would be almost a pity that the Congress should break up, as by all account you have derived so much benefit from your residence, and this Climate is so injurious, that the idea of your returning to sink again into the state of into inanity into which you had fallen, is so painful I could almost wish for...
The last time I wrote you I was so excessively fatigued and it was so late that I scarcely know what my letter contained since which I have been expecting a letter from you and am much disappointed at not receiving one though I shall cease to regret it if your silence is caused by the arrival of the English Commissioners we have news to the 22d from England from which we learn that Mr...
This Letter my dear son, is to introduce to you, and mrs Adams, the Lady of Major Manners, whose mother has written to me to request it. as the daughter of our much Loved, and highly respected Friend, the late Dr Rush, You will receive her with kindness. Ever since the death, of that friend of your Fathers, and of the family, I have had an occasional correspondence with mrs Rush—and your...
Your charming letter only reached me last night the roads being very bad but it came time enough to put me in high spirits and I went immediately after to a little Ball at Miss Focks were I amased myself very much and did not return untill 3 o’clock this Morning Thank God for all the good news you gave me may he still grant us his protection and as you say turn the hearts of our enemies all my...
I recieved your kind Letter, of the 22 July, and was very glad you were so much pleased with my Letter. I still keep my Journal, and Copy my Letters in my Letter Book. Mama had some Cucumbers planted in her Garden, first there came green leaves, afterwards yellow Blossoms, and when the flowers dropped off, I found a number of little Cucumbers. We had also a great many Strawberries and...
I am sure you must have thought me mad from the date of my last letter I was so teazed with Muziks of every discription that I found it utterly impossible to write any thing like sense I however thought it better to send my letter bad as it was than suffer the Post to leave Petersburg without a few lines which would at any rate prove that we were well and preparing to join you as soon as...
We had concluded from appearances here that you would be detained some days at Revel, but I did not imagine that your stay would have been so much prolong’d. I last night had the pleasure of recieving your number 3, and at the same time the mortification of discovering that number 2 was missing this of course causes me some uneasiness as I believe few of your correspondents would be willing to...
I received your kind letter of the 30 of September in due time and although it confirmed the bad news which had flown to us here from every quarter it contributed much to console me and the revived hopes which have been created by this very calamity have nearly restored me to health though not to spirits our good friend L. is all of a sudden become so sanguine as to the affairs of America that...
The east wind of this day, will prevent the Sailing of the Galen, and it gives me the opportunity of acknowledging the receipt of your Letter of May 13th No 87; and the papers containing the Royal Marriage which came to hand last Evening: by the arrival of a vessel at N york; this interesting , and important intelligence, had been partially communicated to the publick a week before—Some...
In consequence of a Letter from my Agent at L”pool I declined going to that place for a passage to South Carolina—I will Sail from the port of London, in the course of a few days, but will wait upon your Excellency personally to take leave, & to be the Carrier of any Dispatches your Excellency may confide to my care prior to my Sailing—Lord Viscount Lowther Arrived at his House 25 Pall Mall...
Still no Letter from you mon Ami! I can scarcely account for this, as Mr Hall wrote me, that you had had very fine winds, for six days after your departure, from Gottenburg. I wait impatiently for tomorrow, in the hope that the Post of to day, may have brought me a few lines, at least to announce your safe arrival. the irrisistable desire I feel to offer you my sincere congratulations on your...
Before I closed my Letter to you, I received this morning your Letter sent by mr Harris, of october 25th. I rejoiced to See your hand writing altho I read with trembling. I have participated in your greif, and shared your Sorrows. let not gloom and melancholy take root in your mind the wounded heart must have time to recover from the Stroke which has pierced it. there are Duties which you are...
The confusion around me and the perpetual interruptions render it almost impossible for me to write a word I shall therefore only say that and Charles I are well and that I cannot see the day on which I shall leave St Petersburg as every thing appears to go wrong— As you are in France I have thought it best to sell every thing that I can sell as the frig ate to America from will cost almost as...
With what pleasure I read your last kind Letter you are capable of judging who are so well acquainted with the warmth of my feelings on most of the subjects which interest me, my hopes are so strongly raised even the news which our old friend Corbeau gave me yesterday could not destroy the flattering Visions which my sanguine imagination had created and I shall still hope that heaven will...
Yours of the eighth is come not to fill me with doubts because that was already effected but to make those doubts almost certainties and those of a very disagreeable nature if it must be so there is no remedy but I hope you have been misinformed about our commander and that he may prove better than you expect— What do you think of the English Speech? it is most affectedly peacable, and...
Your two last numbers 21 and 22 came together as usual on Saturday last. I could not help smiling at your idea of the Rose bud which though very pretty I have no sort of claim to Master Charles painted it and without my knowledge slipped it into the Letter to shew you what he could do Martha was his instructress and I had nothing to do with it at all. I always doubted the fact of the Crown...
I address you once more from this place and I cannot yet say when I shall be able to leave it as I find it almost impossible to dispose of the things to any sort of advantage no body has ready money and I am offer’d payment in a variety none of which however I am apprehensive would please you Hemillian has just left he came with a view to purchase the Carriage and offer’d to pay me in Peals or...
I went to School last Wednesday, as I could not cross sooner on account of the Ice. At Dinner, I heard that mr: Severin’s House in the Country, was burnt to the ground; the fire spread so fast, that it was impossible to put it out. Mrs: Severin lost all the Clothes, Table-linen &c. of all the family, which had been sent out the night before. Mrs: S. had left town herself, and was met on the...
I know how good a recent date is from a far country. accordingly my heart leaped with joy at receiving a packet the other morning dated in June, without recollecting that it was now only july, and that I could not get a Letter in so short a space of time, and 1812 Soon convinced me of my mistake. it came as usual with a patch upon the Seal, altho not endorsed, and if you turn to the date, you...
Although Mr. H.—has informed me that the Congress is dissolved, still I persevere in writing, as it is easy to have my letters returned in case you should have left Ghent.What is pretended to be the terms on which great Britain will treat, was yesterday published in the Conservateur, if there is any truth in this, it needs no Comment The Emperor will not return here untill the end of December...
I have already written to you by the Galen, my Letter was anteriour to the calamity which the inclosed papers will full soon, inform you of.—what can we Say? but Lord thou destroyest the hopes of man. I know not how to describe the Gloom which has overspread the public mind—To departed worth, the tear of Friendship flow’s. Party Spirit is Silent, and drops her veil, and bows acknowledging...
After a very troublesome and tedious journey we have happily arrived at Berlin where I expected to have found Letters from you but I am cruelly disappointed and am impatiently waiting for the next Post which will not arrive untill tomorrow evening Yesterday I visited some of our old friends here who received me in the Kindest manner possible Countess Bhrul is very much alter’d but Miss Bisho p...
Not having heard from you by the last Mail on which I calculated we are all very much disappointed at it and very impatient to hear of your safe arrival at Stockolm— I am in the midst of confusion on account of Chareles who is order’d out immediately by Dr. Galloway and to be put on a milk and Vegetable Diet I fear this will displease you on account of the expense but as the Dr. thought it...
Monday Morning. Mr Webster accepts with pleasure Mr & Mrs Adam’s Invitation to dine on Thursday— Sir, Wednesday 3 ‘clock I am, today, affected with So severe a cold it has been quite impossible for me to call at the Department, as I proposed to do, last Evening. I hope to be well enough to do it on friday. Yrs, with very true / regard Wednesday P.M Mr Webster very much regrets that the...
You will no doubt be much surprized at hearing from me, so soon after your departure; but a delemma has already occurred, and I write to know your intentions, respecting the letters that may arrive here. I supposed you had left your directions with Mr Smith, but he informs me that you only mentioned the public Papers, and intimated that you would speak to me about the private letters. I...
Mama presented me your kind Letter of the 20th. of June, No 2, which I read with great pleasure, particularly that part of it which tells of the dress, of the Boys and Girls; in Holland. I laughed very much at the large breeches, and Umbrella petticoats, and wished very much I could be with you, to see all these droll things. I have come home for a Vacation of three weeks, but Mr Fishwick has...
According to your desire I begin again to number my letters but I hope at least that our correspondence will not be prolong’d much longer and that you will soon return to cheer us again by your presence which I assure you, is much wanted Your last appear’d to me to be written under a considerable depression of spirits and I was almost apprehensive that you were sick some disagreeable...
I have just closed one Letter to you which is to go to Lisbon from thence to the care of mr Beasley. this is to go to France. upon the 30 of August I wrote you a melancholy Letter nor will this be less So. it is allotted to me to be the maven who is to convey to you all the Calamities which afflict our family and they have rooled in wave after wave, the Death of your Dear and only Sister who...
My troubles will never end till you return and I really if it does not soon happen I shall be tempted to decamp from here whether you like it or no you will tell me that I am again in a fit of low spirits it is very true I am suffering bitterly at the baseness of the World who take every possible advantage of my unprotected situation I have just paid Mr Krehmer for the two Months rent and he...
I have to acknowledge your favours of 23 April No. 86 of the 15 May No 87, and yesterday by mr Bond your Letter of May 20th No 88, and the Review and news paper The Reviews you will charge, as your Father requests, with the other Books which you Send him I inclose to you a Strip of a newspaper which contains some account of our National Jubilee, an event of more consequence to America, than...
The last letter that you wrote to me was dated of the 16 of December I was very glad to get it as I am always when I receive Letters from you. I wish you would tell Mrs: Smith to write to me she has promised to write to me but I do not receive any Letters from her. I went to a Ball at Mrs: Krehmers and Danced eight Country Dances. I would have Danced ten Dances but I Missed out two of them. I...
The inclosed Letter I received a few days Since to forward by the first opportunity. my last Letter was addrest to Mrs Adams, and went by a vessel direct for St Petersburgh belonging to Loring & Curtis, which Saild in April. This will inform you that your sons are both well. your Father and myself as well as old Age can expect to be. neither of us Deaf dumb or blind as yet, trembling and...
As you desired I left off writing although I had prepared a letter. As Mama has just recieved your Letter of the 23 September permitting us to write again I send you an extract from my Journal because I have so much to do for my Masters I cannot get a letter ready for the next Post. You will be surprised to learn that I have acted a part in a french play which was performed at Mrs: Krehmers on...
I was never more at a loss what to say to you than at the present moment, to accuse you of neglect I cannot, I will not, for I do not believe it possible—yet so unfortunate have I been, that not a line has reachd me from you of a later date than the first of last May, two packets have since been received containing Letters for your Father your Brothers & your children, but not a solatary line...
I am this instant setting off and have only time to say that nothing can equal my impatience to see you some of my business is necessarily left undone but I hope that you will forgive all that is not exactly correspondant to your wishes and recieve me with as much affection as fills my heart at this moment for you. I could not celebrate my birthday in a manner more delightful than in making...
I recieved your very kind letter of the 31st: of May, which Mama gave me the day before yesterday. I came to Mama’s Country house last Saturday. There is a very small Garden, in which I play; Mama is going to give me some seeds to sew, and I hope to become quite a Gardener. I have already got a Spade, a Rake, and a Wheel-barrow. You ask me what part of the Bible I am in? the lesson I read...
I would not come to Town to day because I knew I should only add to yours, and my own agony, my Heart is with you, my prayers and blessing attend you, the dear Children you have left, will be dearer to me for the absence of their parents, and my care whilst, Providence continues to me my faculties, and my Life. If your Father and I Should be removed, they cannot fail of finding Friends and...
I have already written to you twice by this opportunity. I had not intended to have taken my pen the third time, but having received intelligence from Washington which I wish’d might be communicated to mrs Adams, and her Sister with that prudence and tenderness which so distressing an event calls for I thought it best to communicate to you the Sudden death of Mrs Hellen, who was at Church on...
Your No 14 is just put into my hands and the hope it gives me of your return has come most opportunely to restore me to something like happiness my spirits were so much depressed at the parting with my Sister and her Dear Babe and the house is so dull and gloomy without them that I roam about like a spirit without knowing what to do with myself or on what to fix my attention Charles is almost...
Previous to my return to this City, I recd. a letter from Mrs. Adams, your highly respectable Mother, communicating your anxiety to leave a situation rendered insupportable by the ruinous expences found to be inseparable from it; & taking for granted that you had written or would write to the Secy. of State to the same effect. The answer to her was, that as it was not the intention of the...